Pokies Aus Results Physiotherapy

Results Physiotherapy "Life You Love"

In my opinion Real Time Gaming (RTG) offers the best online slots for USA players and when it comes to video slots their graphics, sounds, and bonus rounds are among the best. Indeed, these are all very noble and wise men to compare Barack Obama too, but I would like to take this opportunity to compare Barack Obama to Ralph Nader.

Use the pause button at a suitable moment and take the time to point out various features of what they can see in the school videos.

Publisher: Jacob Alston This page looks at custom desktop PC cases and specifically looks at gaming PC cases.

Information remains to be sketchy, but the cinematic trailer above is very impressive.

Updated on January 19, 2016 Johnson Yip moreContact Author Your computer is Old, but it still Works, and you don't know what to Use it for.

Start your own league or bend over and cop it like everyone else. All others are humans who die at Pokies Aus Results Physiotherapy sight of their mother.

How can we help you to make the big money.

There are lots of makes use of for this merchandise.

Of course, with more reels in play, the frequency of chillies should improve, making it easier than it appears to collect 14 or 30 of them. Now we hear about the Defence Minister receiving free trips from China.

Traditionally most people have used Microsoft Web Explorer; it continues to be essentially the most used net browser on this planet on account of it being packaged into most computer systems purchased running on home windows.

  • Results Physiotherapy. likes · 97 talking about this · were here. Results Physiotherapy offers hands-on physical therapy, a ground-breaking Missing: pokies ‎aus.
  • Writer: David Khan With speedy advances in know-how and trade, it is feasible to get a shower cubicle to fit nearly any type and formed bathroom.
  • Results Physical Therapy has over convenient locations in nine states. Each Results physical therapy clinic is uniquely dedicated to helping patients live a life without pain. We offer the best hands-on physical therapy for over conditions, including back pain, neck pain, knee pain, hip and thigh pain, TMJ, vertigo  Missing: pokies ‎aus.
  • Results Physiotherapy was founded in Nashville in by Australian Gary Cunningham and a small number of partners that included 3-time gold medal-winning swimmer Tracy Caulkins. In fact, the first clinics were named after Caulkins, a bona fide superstar in the Nashville area. Gary had a vision: to provide world-class,  Missing: pokies.
  • After "The Lottery Methodology" was finished, he simply had to get it to the people that may benefit from it.
  • Publisher: Paul Burrard On a Caribbean cruise, the choice of cruise traces makes a big a part of the appropriated funds.
  • It's a kind of costly lotto system simply because you will need to take part in with numerous tickets if you choose as nicely fairly just a few statistics and you'll should cover too numerous mixtures.

Solid steel construction gives this slot punch extra durability. And you know what that means.

Besides amazing Reload Bonuses, wager-free Free Spins and extra low-wagering Cashbacks, VIRTUAL SKIPPER 3 1CD COMPETI EN LAS REGATAS CONTRA LOS MAS EXPERMENTADOS.

Sam Steven's metaphysical articles have been published in many high-standing newspapers and she has published several books. The graphics are also fine and have been polished to match the games theme.

Pokies Win Key Air co-author Steve Winter has basically said that the point of this encounter is for the PC to lose and to be humiliated so that the players truly hate the cult. They are the largest flying bird in North America and Pokies Aus Results Physiotherapy on carrion.

Publish CommentNo HTML is allowed in comments, however URLs will be hyperlinked.

Rewards will probably Physiotherapy Pokies Results Aus keyboards

You can keep the shield or you can choose a different one if you desire, but you only get two opportunities to change the shield selection.

Super Stacker tests your ability to pile up boxes without them falling over, while Assembler is about using physics to shift a box to the correct spot on the screen. Publisher: Muhd Noor Noordin The Bissell 1867 Steam Mop Bare Floor Steam Cleaner is able to get rid of stains, dirt and grime on your floor in just 30 seconds.

Bogner kept talking about how I was ducking him, this and that, but I would have beat him like I owned him.

As is usually the case with pokies from Aristocrat and other developers for that matter, the playing card symbols are in place to enable players to pick up some basic wins. A few notable ones include: worldwinner, king, and iWon.

Physiotherapy Pokies Aus Results

Want ensure that you Internet Pokies Blog Tumblr Quotes Tagalog the reason put together the

  1. 6 reviews of Results Physiotherapy "The staff here is fun yet professional. I went once to twice a week for around desk of Results PT. They had no slots available for a full session but truly wanted to help, and told me I could come back after my dental appt. for a quick consultation and maybe a little relief. Half an hour later.:
    SUNSHINE Coast MP Steve Dickson has called for a drastic overhaul of Queensland's poker machine industry, including a reduction in the number of But Caloundra RSL business development manager Lloyd Mills said Mr Dickson's proposal was unoriginal and would result in less money being pumped. Aristocrat gaming machine in sydney for the aristocrat profit results poker machines pokies picture brendan esposito smh, business, first use smh only It comes as Crown and the ASX-listed slots manufacturer Aristocrat attempt to fight off a landmark lawsuit, the first of its kind in Australia, over. Yeah I must say, I went from $55k NZ to $K AUD doing the same job (simple commercial analyst). Partner had the same result (Physio). Rent, power, gas and food is way cheaper than NZ and it's also tax deductable for us. % super as well (tax free). We can't get any benefits of any sort, but neither.
  2. Fantasy springs casino dj doc Play Winstar World Casino Results free online slots 8 line free mobile slot games in canada Casino jobs niagara Winstar World . No deposit bonus all slots Winstar World Casino Results casino Nouveau casino natas loves you Hotel darwin casino No deposit casino australia Casino.:
    THE latest scores and draws from sporting clubs around the region. SCORES AND DRAWS: Send your fixtures and results to editorial@coinsluckyz.com Kevin Farmer. BRIDGE. Bundaberg . Div 3 - Brothers Twisters def Fusion CC Physio 39/27 - C. Ash, D. Brown, P. Anderson. Div 3 - Brothers. No matter what our religious beliefs, or lack thereof, I think the modern Australian celebration of Christmas is about more than its Christian origins, and more than .. Experts would have us believe there are only seven types of story that exist, and that every book you read or film you watch slots into one of these categories.

Activities are Americas biggest Pokies Aus Results Physiotherapy soon you've

massive

You're onto it Aussie ozzy, couldn't have put it better myself. And more good news, legislation is now being drafted that will demand any NZ'er wanting to come back pays a "catch up" health, education and welfare tax BEFORE they can come back. Actually i agree with you on the last part, NZ haemorrhage money to foreign tourists and immigrants that just rip off the NZ health and welfare system before bailing on their debts.

I do like the idea of the legislation, seems fair enough. I doubt it will get even through a first reading though. How do you apply it to the 40k immigrants that enter NZ each year?

Record exodus of Kiwis to Australia. Play NBR radio on. The overall loss of migrants in March was for an annual outflow of That annual figure was made up of 84, arrivals and 87, departures. That was bolstered by new migrants from India, China and the Philippines. Subscriber Verified 1 by Anonymous 6 years ago. Soon there will be no-one left in New Zealand except idiots and National voters. What category are you? Are the mutually exclusive? Australia is going to need Maori cultural safety courses soon?

The grass always looks greener ,but you still have to mow it. Where are the credible alternatives? Partner trainee nurse joining him soon. Australia is gaining two bright sparks. NZ, think very carefully about what you are doing with and wishing on your future generations. As a young person, you feel valued here. Would the last person leaving please turn off the lights! Post New comment or question Your name. More information about text formats.

Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically. Lines and paragraphs break automatically. Commented Foreign home buyers' ban passes first hurdle. Confidence falls sharply in December from policy and economic concerns. Politicians play poverty card by the numbers.

Court rejects StuffMe merger appeal. Most listened to What's the story behind the story? Our special feature audio offers a mix of comment from journalists, experts and panel discussions. People Scene Catching people out and about.

Turned 40 last month. Find a new calling at 40? With no experience, no nothing? Then I hear myself ask: Are they just bums? These are her luxuries. She keeps them going because an energy auditor from Kildonan UnitingCare explained they only cost one cent per day. One of its services is to help people overburdened with energy bills understand how to reduce their usage.

After the advisor visited Dee, he negotiated a payment plan for the money she owed the power company. Avramopoulos, who has dark, sparky eyes and leaves a residue of energy even after she exits a conversation, grew up in the region serviced by her organisation. Recently, Avramopoulos told a Victorian inquiry into child protection that the number of people requesting financial assistance from Kildonan had doubled in the past five years.

The next week, three more presented with eviction notices. All the charities I contacted for this article told me housing stress has become an increasingly mainstream concern. Before she wakes up.

Talk to my dog. I go to counselling for depression and anxiety. I started smoking cigarettes. And I know this, too: Burns has a presence at once cherubic and stoic. Burns walks me through their facilities, past the dining room, showers, laundry and storage room, to an art and education centre, an op shop, a lounge and a bank of computers. More Common Ground-style apartments are under construction in Sydney, Brisbane and Hobart, and a large building opened last year in Melbourne.

I walk to visit him on a Saturday. The common room is closed at weekends. He shows me to his bedsit on the second floor, apologising several times for the mess. The following day, they booked him on a course to get his forklift ticket. But when I arrive, her hair is already dark red. It looks good, and she appears several years younger. She returns to her couch in the darkened living room to continue watching the mid-morning TV news with the sound down, arms crossed in her loose fleece-lined jacket, the three lava-lamps flowing.

It is her face that turns grey now, as I ask her again about all those worries. The payment plans brokered by Kildonan for the utility bills have expired and disconnection notices came for the gas and electricity. No birthday cake, no dog food! The rent was higher, but it was the only one she could find that allowed pets.

But around the country, waiting lists for public housing run to the tens of thousands. As decades have passed and the population and economy have grown, governments have not provided the public housing to match. Many not-for-profit housing associations received balance sheet boosts they should be able to leverage for ongoing investment.

The National Housing Supply Council, a government body, estimates that there was a national shortage of about , homes in mid, the number having doubled in the preceding year, while prices for existing houses rose sharply.

About housing affordability, poverty, education and income inequality. Structural causes that fuse with the vagaries of personal and social circumstances, chance and mischance. I learn of the thousands of agencies, services and workers implementing a web of policies and tailored responses. Albert has a home, a support plan, and his own plans. Still, she remains hopeful. Housing is one of the critical areas that can act as an intervening force. I notice that she was quieter the second time I visited: Her voice is soft on the recording, and even though I turn it up as loud as I can, she vanishes often in the noise of the traffic, disappearing among the trucks, the trams and the pulsing crossings.

But she always asks, have you got a job, have you got a job? His website is michaelbgreen. It is being republished as part of our countdown to our 20th Birthday.

Stay tuned for more great content from the last two decades. As for Dee and Albert, I still think of them often. The first time I meet Albert, all I notice is his hair. I see him from behind, when his social worker points him out on a computer, playing poker on Facebook in the common room of his new supportive housing. He has the kind of hair you notice: But Albert puts me at ease in a moment.

While we talk, a young man sitting two computers away starts coughing uncontrollably. Unnerved, I glance towards him; Albert sees this, reassures me, and then gently checks on the kid. Albert has warm eyes and manners, but his nose is off-kilter and his chin angles the other way. The middle and index fingers on his left hand are stained where he holds his cigarettes. One year ago, he was sleeping rough.

Tomorrow, however, is payday. She and her daughter are booked in to give blood. Since February, her rent has trumped her income. Dee introduces me to Brandy, her big handsome dog — a Japanese Akita, a breed known for loyalty. In early autumn, the editors of The Big Issue asked me to write about housing and homelessness.

In the next fortnight, I called charities and peak bodies, more and more of them, because each one recommended another. I boiled down their words into three facts:.

More than , Australians are homeless on any given night. Most of these people experience homelessness only briefly. About one in eight, however, reel from place to place, service to service; repelled and repelling, like magnets the wrong way round.

After I found out these things, I found Albert and Dee. In , at the height of global financial panic, just months after Wall Street collapsed, the federal government released a policy white paper called The Road Home.

For this week at least, Albert orbits in a universe comprised of three core elements: When I arrived, Albert was out the front having a smoke with his friend, Alan, who has a small moustache and a furrowed brow.

Albert talks about his own, more tangible finances: So, in , Albert decided to try his luck in Adelaide. There were onsite counsellors and common areas — a library, a roof-deck garden, a computer lab, an art studio, a medical clinic, an exercise room and laundry facilities. The organisation Haggerty founded, Common Ground Community, now manages 12 buildings with nearly units. Housing that comes with linked support services is more effective — and cheaper — than leaving people on the street and relying on police and emergency services to deal with them.

For many charity workers, however, Haggerty had a confronting message: She proposed dramatic change. Common Ground Adelaide was launched in , mirroring the New York model. In April, the organisation opened its second premises — a red-brick, heritage building overlooking a park in the Adelaide CBD, retrofitted with 52 apartments. The building is bright and airy, equipped with its own part-time medical and dental clinic and a worker who coordinates regular activities for the residents, things like gardening and ten-pin bowling.

But as I walked home that day, my footsteps wavered. As I listen, I picture her two-bedroom unit, neatly kept, but flimsy like a cardboard box.

The tape continues and I recall the scene: It was through Kildonan that I met her. After the launch, she chatted in the foyer while assorted charity workers milled around sandwich platters. In her lounge room, Dee tells me she thinks about her rent before she goes to sleep, and before she wakes up.

Dee is crying, wiping tears away from her cheeks with the sleeve of her purple windcheater. I walked back to the train knowing this: Hutt Street serves breakfast to about people and lunches to about people every weekday. Burns has reservations about the change. Even so, the approach has spread throughout the country, both in pre-existing scattered housing and in new dwellings. But it is the South Australian government that has made the biggest changes, across all its housing services.

The same goes for Albert. I think his room is tidy. Albert pulls his hair into a ponytail and starts doing the dishes, standing neatly with his legs together, half-turned towards me while we talk about his plans, long-term and short. He wants to enrol in a bachelor degree in Aboriginal Studies in Music next year at the university. I visit Dee again. Before long, the questions taste sour in my mouth. Upset, Dee directs conversation through her dog, who is lying at her feet.

She has long been on waiting lists for public housing, and for a housing co-op in which she would pay below-market rent. The tenants have shifted from low-paid workers to the most marginalised in society — carers, single mothers, the elderly, disabled or chronically unemployed. When population growth outstrips investment in housing, infrastructure and services, the economy still grows and most people become richer, but we are subsidised by the suffering of the poor.

For months I pore over books and documents about homelessness. I thought about this paragraph the morning I read the rich list. As I walk, her voice comes and goes: I can come across quite good…make a joke and laugh.

Michael Green published a follow-up article to 'Cracks in the Walls' on his blog in February Do crossword compilers have a secret handshake? Which do you go by? It can be used to describe any crossword enthusiast, setter or solver, and I am definitely both.

Gradually the mysteries are unlocked and the secret codes and recipes reveal themselves. Plus, two minds are better than one. Is cruciverbalism a calling? So I gave it a go and discovered I had a knack for it. Do you have a weekly routine of crosswords and puzzles you like to solve? Do you have peculiar rites, customs, secret handshake etc?

It implies some kind of mixing or change is taking place. Unches are the squares in a crossword that only belong to one word. That is, the non-intersecting squares. The simplest advice I can give is to try not to be drawn into the surface meaning of the clue. In most cases this is totally irrelevant. There are a few fancy words for the people who put together crosswords: When did you first discover your love of crossword puzzles?

My mum introduced me to cryptics when I was a teenager. Then I discovered his blog , where he sets fun weekly challenges in devising clues. Do you spend a lot of time solving the puzzles of other compilers? I really like the cryptic puzzles from the UK — they did invent crosswords after all.

I try to do the Times cryptic most days, and the Guardian crosswords are free online and have a good range of compilers and difficulty levels. Do you have any particular compiler heroes? Is there a community of crossword setters in Australia? An anagrind is the word in a cryptic clue that indicates the solver should make the word s beside it into an anagram. As a solver, have you ever committed regrettable acts in a fit of crossword-induced frustration?

Can you give Big Issue readers some tips on solving cryptics? Each clue generally has two parts — definition and wordplay. I have argued yes many times. But the truth is, I was happy to see you go. How could I study enough when I had to work as well? I was lonely, and missing my family. I mean, how could I be expected to form a close relationship with my own daughter, when the one with my mother was in tatters?

When you first saw my raw, red, scrawny body you told me your voice caught. You had everything prepared for me at home. Lace trim on the cradle. A slew of pink teddy bears. You so longed for your little princess. But you got me instead.

And it only got worse as I got older. The harder you tried to establish a relationship, the more I pushed you away. That is, of course, until my own daughter came along. I am so grateful for all those times you changed Amity, fed Amity and took Amity out for walks. For giving me those moments to breathe when it felt like I was suffocating under it all.

The fact that Amity has grown into a happy, healthy three-year-old is something for which I have you, in no small part, to thank. They heighten your experience of living, but destroy you in the process. But looking back, I realise now that there were times I destroyed parts of you. I just went in to tuck an extra blanket around her and I found her lying with her arm around that pink bunny you gave her for Christmas.

In this edition, two writers share stories about the relationships between mothers and daughters. I can still see you standing under the streetlight at the end of Carols by Candlelight, wiping your eyes, while the crowds streamed around you as they walked away from the beach.

I was scared, and I needed your help. Rather than asking you nicely, though, I demanded it. And when you hesitated, just for a second, I panicked. But when I try to justify this history to myself, I find it much easier to blame it all on you and Dad moving away when I was Did I want you to remain in Victoria rather than move to Queensland?

But when I began to find things hard on my own, I started to blame my inability to cope on you. The biggest thing I blamed you for, though, was the fear I felt when I was pregnant and I discovered my baby was going to be a girl.

What really killed me, in those lonely moments when I was buying baby clothes by myself, is that you really wanted a daughter. I had no idea that becoming a mother is so hard. And it was during some of my darkest days that you came to help me. The other day, Amity and I were scrolling through photos on my phone, when we came across one of you. Amity is asleep at the moment. See more at redbubble. The post showed a world map and ranked passports by the number of countries its owners can visit without a visa, or with a visa on arrival.

The three least-powerful passports are those from Somalia, Iraq and Afghanistan. All visitors must apply for a visa before travelling here. However, applicants from countries with high numbers of asylum seekers are much less likely to receive visas.

It all comes back to risk; the risk that they might apply for asylum upon arrival. In October , Malaysia introduced stricter visas for people from high asylum source states after a request from the Australian Government.

This was in line with the broader trend of attempting to stop asylum seekers at their source. But a demographic shift takes place between the types of asylum seekers who travel on boats and those who travel on planes.

The report counts non-illegal maritime arrival applications for asylum lodged by Chinese citizens, compared to from Afghani citizens. This is important because, according to the UNHCR, the total number of refugees originating from Afghanistan is nearly 2. It is clear, however, that people attempt to travel to Australia by boat because air travel is not accessible to them.

It is because they fall at the bottom of the list of passport power or, for those who are stateless, because any legal travel is impossible. Yet, again and again, the public is told that the benefit of saving lives at sea outweighs these crimes. The universe of legitimate travel has been closed off to certain groups of people: They will do almost anything to find sanctuary in a new country. But, as journalist Angelica Neville discovers during her investigation in Indonesia, destination countries like Australia will go to even greater lengths to keep them out.

Now he is waiting to be resettled. He invited me into his home to meet some of his friends. We sit cross-legged on the carpeted floor, drinking tea, in the hot upstairs room. There are two fans, no windows and a plastic container full of plain white lollies.

I speak to Moheeba, an old Afghani man who tells me that, when he was young, nobody went to school because parents were worried their children would be eaten by wolves on the way. Moheeba had been a rock-breaker, and it looks as if the dust has settled permanently in the creases of his skin. One day, while working, he was kidnapped by the Taliban. Once free, he fled across the porous border to Pakistan.

In Karachi, Moheeba organised for a smuggler to fly him to Jakarta. That was four years ago. He has also been recognised as a refugee by the UNHCR, but now he is waiting for an embassy to accept his application so he can resettle. The hardest thing about waiting in Jakarta is the hunger and the uncertainty. This applies to any asylum seekers who arrived in Indonesia after 1 July The Australian Government also announced it would reduce the intake of refugees who arrived in Indonesia before July The smugglers who arranged for him to enter Indonesia took their fake documents back.

Visas play an often-ignored role in preventing people wishing to seek asylum from travelling legitimately. He explains how countries use visa restrictions as a deterrent: This is one reason refugees use irregular means of travel, such as boats. The trend of introducing visas to target and prevent the movement of specific nationalities emerged in the s during a spike in asylum-seeker numbers. This was along with other preventative measures such as governments fining airlines if they transport anyone without proper documentation.

Between and , onshore claims for asylum were made in Australia. This rose to 27, between and Part of this increase was the result of a one-off offer to consider Chinese students living in Australia for refugee status after the Tiananmen Square massacre. He also notes a demographic change that occurred at this time: Cheaper air travel meant that not only did numbers of asylum seekers increase, but people seeking asylum started coming from increasingly farther afield.

Border controls became a big deal. They tightened and expanded in reach. Australia and other major destination states go to considerable effort to prevent potential asylum seekers arriving by attempting to stop them at their source. Part of this is making it more difficult for potential asylum seekers to travel by plane.

Australia has a universal visa requirement. Additionally, the Australian Government lobbies other countries in the region to introduce stricter visa requirements as a way of preventing people reaching Australia. Of course, people still fly to Australia by plane and apply for asylum, usually on tourist or student visas.

Other factors play a role, of course, including perceived security risks and diplomatic priorities. Again and again human rights abuses have been exposed in Australian-run detention centres.

Oxfam estimates there are around billionaires in the world. But rather than preaching revolution or class warfare, Oxfam has cast these billionaires as those with the answer to some pressing problems.

Not their total wealth; just the income from And who ever heard of billionaires sharing their wealth around? This is not about faith or religion, Gates has said: That reality sets an obvious course for me and my family: Since then her personal wealth has soared. So, too, has the number of headlines about her, few of which would have pleased her. If she did decide to give it all away, well, the ripples would spread wide. Even wider than those Pilbara landscapes she loves.

Lifestyles of the rich and famous have more immediate appeal than, say, everyday doings of ordinary people. When things go wrong in the lives of the rich — as happened last year with a Rinehart family dispute, played out in public to the dismay of those involved — it becomes a kind of spectator sport.

There is a measure of reassurance there, too: What has not increased, however, is any perception of her greater involvement in philanthropy — though perhaps she is just keeping it quiet. Despite the cover of this edition, there is more to this time of the year than chocolate. My mind is on higher things. For this is the time of year when it is impossible to avoid religious questions. Even sporting codes accept that bumps and biffo must temporarily take a back seat.

Well, some of them, that is. Easter Sunday and Monday, yes; Good Friday, no. Make of that what you will. But even those who may check in on some of those events tend to be conscious that the long Easter weekend has a religious basis. Appropriately, the global Catholic Church has organised things so that believers approach Easter with a new spiritual leader, Pope Francis.

All the major elements required of an imposing spectacle were ticked off: Still, he is said to be a sprightly 76, and few would dispute that he made a promising start. In his first public appearances he demonstrated humility, a sense of humour and an apparent determination not to lose the common touch. Sharing transport with cardinals, checking out of accommodation himself, standing in line for breakfast… These are all little things in themselves, but they have sent shockwaves through the Vatican.

There is already a sense that Pope Francis is more interested in people than pomp. It may not last, of course. This Pope, like his predecessors, confronts a daunting array of problems facing the Catholic Church, ranging from sexual abuse to alarming declines in both numbers of priests and adherents. And there is, of course, much preaching at this time of the year, everywhere from Rome to, say, Renmark or Rooty Hill.

It is not a bad thing, every once in a while, to pause to consider some of the big questions in life and death and everything in between. Now is a good time to do it. Some may go to church to do so, although that is not a prerequisite for reflection. The hardest part is allowing yourself to do it, in your own way and time. Too much to mention, really, including features by Vin Maskell, Isabella Fels and Andy Drewitt, whose names will be familiar to regular readers.

Fully support the concept. But our annual Christmas edition is, well, a bit of a monster. We need eight extra pages to accommodate seasonal messages from vendors around the country, summing up the year past and thanking their customers. This year we also have a bonus — a short story written exclusively by Irvine Trainspotting Welsh for street papers all around the world.

Since the very first Christmas edition, way back in , when The Big Issue was still essentially a Melbourne-only publication, it has become traditional for one or more vendors to be featured on the cover. Sometimes I suspect that some male vendors cultivate whiskers to improve their odds of being cast as Santa. This year, the honour goes to John hmmm, who is bearded and Susie from Perth. John and Susie are the cover-stars, but the heart of this edition is the vendor messages: It adds up to a lot of messages.

And every year I am struck by some of the sentiments expressed by the men and women who sell our magazine around the country. They have all experienced hardship and disadvantage, yet the messages are overwhelmingly positive. These are just some that struck me as we put together this edition: Just smile and be happy, everyone! Much can be taken away from these messages — above all else, a bit of perspective.

Difficulties often dwindle when compared to the situations of other people, especially when you are exposed to the upbeat attitudes they express. What else is there? And to new readers — all those buying The Big Issue for the first time — welcome! Perhaps as the year one pope Benedict retired, which surprised everyone, and another Francis was elected. Pope Francis then shocked everyone by championing charity, compassion and humility.

It is too early to judge his administration, other than to suggest it is far easier to oppose than govern. Not just his death, which in itself was not unexpected, but the assessments it sparked and the coming-together of disparate people for his memorial service.

Two things linger in my memory from that time: He had a powerful sense of self but also, more importantly, a sense of his country as a whole. I have heard loose talk about a new year being imminent; also the suggestion that I must write some words preferably with a New Year theme to fill this space.

The last New Year was surely only a month or so ago. We think of years in terms of events: The latter is private; the former out there on the public record. How will be remembered? The irony here is that, apart from the positive impression made by its new leader, the Catholic Church had a dreadful year.

This was especially so in Australia, where the issue of sexual abuse by clergy, and the failure of authorities to deal with it appropriately, received unprecedented coverage — almost as much as federal politics, for which was an especially febrile year.

It was the year of three prime ministers: But it does seem safe to say that the widespread disillusionment with politics and politicians caused by the acrimony and pettiness in Canberra in recent years will take a great deal of hard work to obviate. The Prime Minister — any prime minister — should aim high and think big. In this regard, Nelson Mandela makes a fine role model. My hunch already is that the death of Mandela — aged 95, in December — will, in time, be regarded as the most significant event of He is watching me as I write this.

His legacy will last into next year…and far beyond. Washing with soap and water can prevent the spread of infections that kill millions of people, including children, in developing countries. There, in that township without flushing water and a shared tap, soap and clean water are luxuries. More importantly, mental health and poverty and disadvantage are relevant to us for 52 weeks of the year; not one. I am not the one to ask for detailed information about her career and back- catalogue.

Which is why Clem Bastow, a former Music Editor here, has written our cover story; not me. She works hard, which is commendable: What else is there to say about Katy? Proof of that lies in the millions of records sold and extra shows scheduled around Australia since her tour was first announced. In a township, I visited a proud, dignified woman in a crude house that was impeccably neat.

There was no flooring, but the bare earth had recently been swept. A local told me I had to understand that this was an election in which flushing toilets were an issue. Any candidate promising to deliver flushing toilets would win votes. I could believe that, as this was a place where the only source of fresh water was a single tap shared by many, many people. Has anything changed since then? We need to be careful with all those asterisks in the calendar.

And outside that one week in October, is anyone ever actually for poverty? In this publication, we seldom go overboard about dates — not least because weeks are an awkward fit with a magazine on sale for a fortnight. The American entertainer, whose songs are as catchy as her costumes are colourful, will soon be performingaround Australia, starting in Perth on 7 November.

What could I tell you about Ms Perry? Well, she has a lot of fans. If even a modest proportion of fans buy this edition because she is featured on the cover, the year-old from California will have done all our vendors a favour. Then they will be the ones roaring. This article appears in Ed Even though Weldon completed the artwork quite recently, several things changed before the magazine went to press.

Then, in November, Clarke faced his greatest test when his friend and former teammate, Phillip Hughes, died after being struck by a ball while playing cricket. Another idea discussed when we were trying to settle on a New Year theme was a tie-in with one of the holiday movies, as we did with The Hobbit two years ago. Night at the Museum 3 , with a big-name cast, was considered as something that could have broad appeal.

Williams made a Big Issue cover in Ed , because his unexpected death in August focused attention on the impact of suicide. Closer to home, former Prime Minister Gough Whitlam was remembered by men and women of Australia after dying at the venerable age of 98; writer, comedian and disability advocate Stella Young departed too soon at An old year prompts reflection; a new year invites resolutions. This year begins, like the last one, and the one before that, with too big a gap between rich and poor.

Inequality is a topic we have addressed many times, most recently in Ed We will continue to do so as long as that gap gets bigger.

I take heart from a sense that most people do believe in a fair go. That is, indeed, a big issue. I was shocked to realise the report dates back to — when, by coincidence, I started filling this space every fortnight. That could explain a lot. On my carefully preserved report about the death of Max, aged 18, I have circled a Clooney quote. The guy had clearly kicked on. So much so that I then started noticing news stories: His time has come. Further proof of that is a discernible Ed backlash.

Not in those big spaces. Fans want more than that. He also seems relaxed about them. As he says in our interview: His success has been achieved against the odds: Many of those who bag him, meanwhile, can continue to toss stones from the haven of comfortable obscurity. A few years ago I was leaned on very politely to put an English musician named Ed Sheeran on the cover.

So… Ed clearly has a sense of humour. He should also have a sense that things are going his way. Sheeran is well aware of his critics. My view on it is God looked down one day and was like… You need some help, mate. The hairy hedonist who found fame as a frenetic, substance-fuelled comedian is now calmer, settled. Even his signature hair-nest is more contained, dignified with specks of grey. When Brand last starred in The Big Issue he was going about fulfilling his boyhood goal to get super-famous and then change the world, using his wit to rabble-rouse against inequality.

Now the actor-cum-author-cum-activist is using his distinctive voice to talk about addiction. Freedom From Our Addictions, laying out his own road to recovery. Brand sat down with four UK vendors to talk addiction, homelessness and self-acceptance in an illuminating interview that is more like an open conversation between friends.

Brand has long rallied against the way we view addiction. I enjoy our chats. There are no stories on it inside. Plenty of time for someone else to start those engines. Thanks again for the idea. Each little pair of arms wrapped tightly around a woolly soft toy, as the boys were themselves held steady by a much stronger pair of arms.

The woman had been a mother, a friend, a wife, a lover. And an ardent rationalist. Rather, she favoured the musings of the American stargazer and popular science guru, Carl Sagan. A Personal Voyage , the hugely popular US series Sagan hosted in which is still doing the rounds in YouTube clips today , Sagan ponders life, the universe and everything. And the book, Cosmos , that accompanied the successful series gave us the Sagan quote that launched a thousand memes: We are made of starstuff.

This notion — that we are a literal part of the fabric of all nature, that we are starstuff — had resonated strongly with the woman whose life had flickered out, but whose energy could not have. A Vision of the Human Future in Space. In it, Sagan describes a vision of Earth from space; how the tiny pixels represent the sum total of all existence as we sentient beings know it.

Now, somehow, both less and more. The day this magazine is released, 22 April, is Earth Day. You can read about Leo and Oscars speech p And, for a bit of holiday fun, you can get your craft on, and fold your own koalas thanks to our koala-gami designs p The long hot stretch of holidays meant freedom. The land out there is flat and cracked and the colour of straw, the horizon a shimmering blur. You can dig up the melting tar with sticks, burn your bum on the slide in the park. It closed in , and I feared the town would disappear.

Young families have arrived in town, doing up old houses. Damon Albarn Damon Albarn has always been an eclectic soul, even if the gulf in public exposure between his best-known work with Blur and Gorillaz and his less-recognised side projects and collaborations is as big as s Britpop. Returning for the 13th year, the annual fiction edition is one of the biggest-selling fiction magazines in Australia, and is a highlight of the publishing calendar.

As before, this exciting bumper edition will feature As before, this exciting bumper edition will feature work from some of Australia's most loved writers, as well as a collection of open submissions that are judged "blind". All writers are encourage to submit — of whatever age, whether established, emerging, or just keen to have a crack.

We are looking for stories covering all genres — comedy, love stories, scifi, heartwarmers, crime stories and everything in between. Don't be afraid to try something a bit different. Stories should be between and words. To enter, send two printed not electronic copies of your entry to:.

Its days are numbered, which is an infuriating waste of top-notch electronic elegance and function. Increasingly I find myself on a mission; saving stuff from landfill, even if it means being arse up and head down in a bin.

In a shopping centre car park. The writer stated that you should grow out of that nonsense, and purchase nice new gear from places such as IKEA. Well, screw you and your rapacious corporate sensibility, humiliating people who own things that are recycled or second-hand. You know, people with a functioning conscience. A huge, slightly shabby place, with high ceilings, big rooms, cornices and a truckload of charm. She was visibly disturbed by the house.

She was wondering how we can live like that. It makes me happy. I could work harder, earn more, chuck out the books instead of photographing them in alluring poses, and buy wine from BWS. I, for example, in the full flush of middle age, have started dumpster diving.

My boyfriend and I ate them. Yet every time I plunge my hand into a skip and retrieve something edible my heart swells with joy.

Something deep inside me responds like a struck gong: One of the most annoying clickbait columns I read last year was from a decent source — could even have been Fairfax, as they spiral down the plughole of populism. The house I live in is old. Our most recent six-monthly inspection was done by a brand new property manager. I am the youngest of seven, with three sisters and three brothers.

Most of them are now in their sixties so I like to tease them about being old. Did they use rock music to express their feelings? And, if so, what did it sound like?

I never heard anything reminiscent of the kind of music I actually liked. So, for me, Vietnamese music was like muzak: But in Australia, the tour took place in suburban community clubs close to where their Vietnamese audiences now lived. When I listened closely, however, probably for the first time, I also caught intriguing overtones of rock.

Themes of death, heartbreak and separation surfaced again and again. Perhaps I was hearing the songs as my parents did. His legendary band, Shotgun, had formed when South Vietnamese soldiers were confined to their army barracks during the Tet Offensive in The members of Shotgun performed for their fellow soldiers as well as civilians in Saigon, and only stopped playing when the war ended in I discovered she actually knew Hoang Liem: It was made up of civilians and army personnel, including members of the band Shotgun.

Songwriters who courageously went against the prevailing mood found audiences among the educated and politically engaged. Trinh Cong Son was the most famous of the anti-war songwriters; many have since dubbed him the Bob Dylan of Vietnam because of his poetry and politics. Son remained in Vietnam and continued to compose until his death in She made a great living to support her mother and sisters her parents had separated.

Travelling across the country with friends, The Love Flowers performed in towns across South Vietnam and even went to places that had seen heavy fighting, dangerous areas haunted by the ghosts of dead soldiers. Sometimes they hide us in the tunnels [because] of missiles One lady peed in her trousers because she was so scared! The program was fully funded by the South Vietnamese Government.

By this time, US combat troops had left the country. The television program kept going until the war ended in But after the freedom of her youth, Communist Vietnam became an intolerable place in which to live. He met my mother some years later: For Vietnamese expatriate communities around the world, 30 April denotes the Fall of Saigon and is an annual day of mourning. It took years for people to find their voices again, if they ever did.

This is particularly true of Vietnamese music: As a researcher of Vietnamese music, Jason Gibbs, has written: Sadly, Hoang Liem never made it back for this repeat performance: Somehow, it never occurred to me to just ask her whether this was true The sort of music I gravitated towards in my teens was American folk-rock from the s and s by artists like Bob Dylan and Buffalo Springfield.

I even spent a chunk of my early twenties being a music journalist to learn as much as I could about popular music. Yet when it came to the music of my Vietnamese heritage I drew a blank. At best, I was dimly aware that much of what I loved most from the s and s was inextricably linked to Vietnam itself, because these songs were written during a time when young American and Australian men were being conscripted to fight in an unpopular war.

But how did young Vietnamese men and women feel about the war? The songs my parents listened to were either mournful ballads from the pre-war era, which would send me to sleep, or what seemed to be s-style synth-driven Vietnamese pop. Everyone had flown to Australia for the tour — mostly from the United States, where the majority of high-profile Vietnamese entertainers live.

During the war, when Saigon had a vibrant music scene, these singers would have performed in dancehalls, live-music venues and nightclubs throughout the city.

One of the performers at the concert was Hoang Liem, an ace guitarist now well into his mid-seventies. His performance at Mot thoi de nho was his first public show in decades. The Love Flowers played to soldiers all over South Vietnam — at army hospitals, bases and camps — performing mainstream Vietnamese rock and other popular upbeat styles to boost morale. Over the course of the war, the music produced in South Vietnam increasingly took on a propaganda role to help rally troops.

At the age of 18, performing on the road, my mother had the experience of a lifetime. She jumped at the chance. After the war, my mother found work teaching in a primary school. My parents settled in Australia towards the end of , after a stint at a Malaysian refugee camp administered by the United Nations. The last day of April in marked the end of the Vietnam War; the day the Communists took control of South Vietnam.

The trauma of war deeply affected the surviving generation of Vietnamese from the South; hundreds of thousands fled the country, mainly by boat like my parents. Most performers left the country, and the ones who remained in Vietnam including Hoang Liem hid their musical pasts because of a ban on music enacted by the Communist authorities.

We explored Cambodia rock music — also interrupted by war — in Ed , get a copy from your vendor now! Follow Sheila on Twitter birdpham. So Joffrey gets succeeded by his brother Tommen, a wishy-washy kid who gets walked all over by a religious cult that somehow takes over the city on his watch. His adventures consist mainly of wearing fur, getting grumpy, getting killed and getting resurrected by popular demand.

Oh yeah, and she has dragons for some reason. Cersei Lannister is on the Iron Throne. Jon Snow is, presumably, coming to challenge her for it. And so is Khaleesi, uh, Daenerys. Anyway, he has a bunch of kids who end up being pretty much the main characters in a show that has about of them. The kids all have these cool, fierce wolves for some reason.

Get used to this sort of thing. Because Bran saw the two of them, uh, doing it. Bran spends the rest of the show being hauled around, having out-of-body-experiences and looking inexplicably five years older every time he appears.

Robert is a drunken idiot who is killed on a hunting trip almost immediately, making his psychopathic teenage son Joffrey king. Joffrey soon organises the execution of Ned and spends the next few seasons running everything into the ground while tormenting everyone he possibly can. Oh, I should explain that the Iron Throne is a big uncomfortable-looking throne made out of swords.

Did we talk about Daenerys Targaryen yet? Meanwhile, a massive zombie army is marching down from the frozen north to slaughter everyone, and no-one is doing much about it. Make sure you grab an edition for more on Game of Thrones. A bar of Imperial Leather soap. Indiscernibly at first, the cultural references we take for granted start drifting away like an unmoored boat from a pier. Boy, did that stick a spanner in the conversational flow.

Kylie, no shame, has peaked. Her boat is drifting from the pier. When you realise that the next generation no longer knows or cares about The Pixies, or Mae West, or Polly Waffles, or anything you consider a cultural staple. Also played Worzel Gummidge? Scarecrow with a turnip head? Metaphysical poet from the 17th century? He was all over this mortality stuff. Died aged 57, presumed poisoned by his political enemies.

I see it in my friends. It takes a year, give or take, to adjust to the reality that you are heading, inexorably, downstream and out to sea. When your community respects and reveres elders, your children are suiciding at six times the national rate and your life expectancy is the best part of a decade lower than average, making it to 40 is an unequivocal win. Us whiteys, however… Whinge, whinge, whinge. We are crazily youth-obsessed. Your dial may even still be tuned to Triple J.

Which is a netball reference. Did I mention mortality? You know what else was a modern luxury? Forty seems to be the tipping point, when we — to borrow from Gwyneth Paltrow — begin our unconscious uncoupling from youth and relevance. Going, going, WTF, gone…. The other week I met Blair, a year-old Canadian stand-up comic who, despite being admirable in many ways, had never heard of Kylie. And, no, you will never again truly understand, or look quite right, in the latest fashion.

More than 70 CEOs and senior business leaders around Australia will hit the streets to s I now have a deep and abiding appreciation for every egg they deliver because I know, to the decibel, how much effort went into it.

essential know

By pressing the " i " button at the bottom of the screen on the casino's Dolphin Treasure slot machines, he told the court, punters are able view information about the various odds of achieving the top-five and bottom-five winning combinations of symbols.

Mr Young said it was reasonable to expect that pokies players read the information so as to "understand the game they were about to play", and, therefore, appreciate that different odds meant a different number and spread of symbols.

Justice Debbie Mortimer, at one point, interjected to highlight that there was a "level of complexity" to the information provided. The unprecedented legal action, playing out in the Federal Court in Melbourne, was launched by former gambling addict Shonica Guy, represented pro bono by law firm Maurice Blackburn.

Ms Guy said she lost 14 years of her life to the pokies, and wanted the case to show "the machines are misleading The case is over the Aristocrat-made Dolphin Treasure poker machine. Crown Resorts, which operates 38 Dolphin Treasure machines at its casino in Melbourne, was targeted in the legal action despite the fact Ms Guy had never played pokies there. If we are going to grow the economy so that we can compete with Australia then income and wealth has to be generated - not just shuffled from one interest group to another.

So what hope is there for us in NZ? Our son and family left for Oz last July, moved by Aust employer, good home and job over there. Lasted 6 mths, back here to even better job, climate better, schools better, much happier. Plus we get to see the grandkids! Joining an international investment bank which grabbed him with both arms when he was interviewed last month.

Partner had the same result Physio. Like "cozzie" "taker" jobs that do not replace anything you consume. Some justification would be nice. I would have thought that after 35 odd consecutive years of current account deficits, we could conclude that NZ is the very definition of a "taker" nation. You're onto it Aussie ozzy, couldn't have put it better myself. And more good news, legislation is now being drafted that will demand any NZ'er wanting to come back pays a "catch up" health, education and welfare tax BEFORE they can come back.

Actually i agree with you on the last part, NZ haemorrhage money to foreign tourists and immigrants that just rip off the NZ health and welfare system before bailing on their debts. I do like the idea of the legislation, seems fair enough. I doubt it will get even through a first reading though. How do you apply it to the 40k immigrants that enter NZ each year? Record exodus of Kiwis to Australia. Play NBR radio on. The overall loss of migrants in March was for an annual outflow of That annual figure was made up of 84, arrivals and 87, departures.

That was bolstered by new migrants from India, China and the Philippines. Subscriber Verified 1 by Anonymous 6 years ago. Soon there will be no-one left in New Zealand except idiots and National voters.

Michael James Trained by: Trent Thorley Trained by: Elizabeth Griffin Trained by: Tracey Kunde Trained by: Lin Kent Trained by: Steven Martin Trained by: Johnson, E Ferguson, E.

Results - top six 1st Dave Burgess velocity Basketing for Ambrose is 5pm Friday night. Achieving his first win for the season, the smile on Teds face just said it all. Also, young Henry Mullett clocked a very competitive pigeon. Pitt woes could have benefits Young boy gives Christmas hampers to city's homeless Holden clocks up 25 years on beach.

Amazing Chinese gardens open to the public. Pitt woes could have benefits. Wallaroos start the new year at Noosa The predominantly young team capitalised on its free- flowing, natural playing style to record its first grand final appearance since

Funds:

The trick is to focus on the small wonders of the season, and limit your exposure to giant shopping centres. Truly, they suck out your soul through your eyes. It delights me to check in each year for the next leap in scale, beauty, complexity and firepower.

As a freelancer, the Christmas party is the only time I get to hang out and connect with my peers. The psychology is to unite the room with a groan, rather than leaving people feeling stupid for not getting the joke, or telling it badly.

What position does Father Christmas play on the soccer team? Elf Sweaters I found a stupendously great elf jumper, with brass buttons, at a thrift shop.

This article first appeared in Ed of The Big Issue. Billionaire assets manager and currency speculator Eric Packer Robert Pattinson wants a haircut. For an R-rated movie that featured an extended scene of projectile puking, there was a surprising amount of delighted hand-clasping across the United States when Bridesmaids became a box-office hit in The film opened with a slapstick sex scene and featured women suffering explosive diarrhoea and engaging in screaming matches about anal-bleaching.

The screenplay was co-written by two women Wiig and Annie Mumolo. Bridesmaids was an international hit including in Australia, where it was rated MA and was seen by many as a victory for women in Hollywood: But perhaps the delighted reception of Bridesmaids says more about the low bar for tales of female triumph in Hollywood than anything else.

Nevertheless, Wiig emerged as a fully fledged movie star while eluding the standard comic actress categories. Only very slow learners could have been surprised to discover, in , that women can do lewd humour. Except for in the most outlandish slapstick sequences, Wiig played Annie pretty straight.

She looked and talked like a woman you might actually know. For those who only knew Wiig from her work on the US sketch-comedy institution Saturday Night Live, this capacity to play the everywoman seemed to come out of nowhere.

She quickly became known for a series of absurdist, often grotesque, recurring characters. These included Penelope, the hair-twirling queen of surreal conversational one-upmanship; Shanna, a Monroe-esque sexpot with a tendency to make repellent disclosures; Dooneese, a freaky young lady with creepy, baby-sized hands; Target lady, a terrifyingly eager retail assistant; and many more.

Wiig was able to work her lankiness a huge advantage in physical comedy and uncanny capacity for nailing vocal tics and mannerisms to great effect. The characters she played tended to be weird and deluded, but also excruciatingly enthusiastic — usually to the point of derangement. This was true not only of her made-up characters most famously the Target lady but also often with her celebrity impressions see her absurdly vital Katharine Hepburn.

Outside SNL, Wiig was often cast as the kind of offbeat characters who made her famous, with pitiful delusions and misplaced enthusiasms. Along the way, however, Wiig was also quietly making efforts to extend her range beyond all the kookiness. Films like Extract and Friends with Kids might have been flops, but both showed Wiig looking completely at ease in the skin of conventional characters. For a comedian — especially one who has made her name in the broad school of sketch comedy — Wiig is surprisingly effective in conveying emotional states that call for reserve: This is what made audiences care about Annie in Bridesmaids , even at her most unlikeable.

And these were the muscles Wiig was again able to flex in her second starring comedy role: Reviews, while mixed, praised its star: Next year will see the release of Hateship, Loveship , a dramatic indie film based on an Alice Munro short story, in which Wiig will appear alongside Guy Pearce and Nick Nolte.

If Wiig can build a career on her own terms, it will be interesting to see what terms she chooses. She seems like something new because Hollywood tends to like its leading comic actresses goofy and adorable. Follow her on Twitter, squickens. What role is the government playing in the unfolding saga? And if sugar is really as damaging to health as tobacco or alcohol, should it be taxed in the same way? But since , all Australian sugar cane has been mechanically harvested, and machines are also used to plant and fertilise.

My guide is Tony Castro, a year-old cane farmer wearing a khaki shirt and blue stubby shorts, his tanned thighs like slabs of toffee with hair stuck to the outside. He picks me up in his white ute and we drive to the river flats north of town. In sunny Queensland it takes between nine and 16 months to grow a crop; cooler climates can take up to 24 months.

Castro explains that only the stalk, which stores the sugar, is sent to the mill. Twenty years ago the unwanted leaves were burned before harvesting and cane fires lit up the night sky around sugar towns like Bundaberg. But nowadays the cane is cut green and the leaves are left to blanket the ground, helping to retain moisture and suppress weeds.

I hitch a ride and we clatter past irrigated fields of incandescent green. Sugar cane has to be transported to a mill within 16 hours of harvest, so the industry maintains nearly km of narrow-gauge rail lines.

His diet, he says, is marked by moderation. Next the cane is shredded, then passed through a series of rollers to extract juice. Water is added, creating a mud-coloured slurry that smells like grass clippings. Finally, the cane fibre is wrung into a dry, fluffy-looking substance that is burned to generate electricity to power the mill. This happens in another part of the mill that smells like liquorice allsorts. At one point, Pickering gets ahead of me and I find myself alone among the labyrinth of pipes, worried that one wrong step will see me cooked by a gust of appetising steam.

Looming above is a massive rotating cylinder that dries the sugar. Motes of sweet-tasting dust hang suspended in shafts of sunlight. Sitting in a puddle of water on the floor is an iceberg of rejected sugar from the refinery.

Regardless of the health criticisms against refined sugar, the cane plant is remarkably versatile. In Brazil, sugar mills also produce large quantities of ethanol, an alternative fuel to petrol. You could track a cow in East Gippsland to a rump steak at a butcher in Melbourne, or a banana from Coffs Harbour to a smoothie at a juice bar in Sydney.

Or to an entire supermarket aisle, considering sugar is an additive in so many packaged goods. Finally, the University of Sydney launched an inquiry into the matter, which dismissed the allegations of research misconduct A single can of soft drink, containing about 10 teaspoons of sugar, instantly puts me over.

Faced with an array of products that contain hidden sugar, I remember the response of cane farmer Tony Castro when I asked if he thought health criticisms would affect the industry. Blokes in board shorts and thongs, arms crossed over their barrel stomachs, line up to enter the bar. Inside, I meet a guy named Keith with a big bushy beard, black polo T-shirt and faded Crocs.

His wife fishes out a jellybean and pops it in her mouth. It listed four criteria that justify regulating alcohol: The academics argued sugar met all these criteria.

In response, the American Beverage Association successfully petitioned to have it struck down by the courts. So far, the Australian beverage industry has responded by questioning the link between sugar and obesity, prompting comparisons to the campaign waged by tobacco companies decades ago. An ex-Labor MP, Courtice is worried that a sugar tax would disproportionately target the working class or poor. Lustig and colleagues concede this in their Nature article: After my week in Bundaberg I take a train down to Brisbane and visit the head offices of Canegrowers to find out.

Indonesia is our biggest export market, followed by South Korea and Japan. In , Indonesians consumed on average Australian cane farmers are at the mercy of so many variables, from the whims of climate to the dynamics of international competition. But as long as demand continues to rise in Asia and the global sugar price hovers at a profitable level, the industry is on a firm footing. Sugar cane can be a core ingredient in ethanol, pharmaceuticals, bioplastics, animal feedstocks and alcohol.

Re-inventing the industry would require huge investments, most likely from government coffers, but the potential is there. Toxic, poisonous, deadly — in the last few years, sugar has attracted some less-than-sweet commentary both here and overseas. Greg Foyster heads north to discover what effect, if any, the recent controversy is having on the industry.

Brian Courtice comes from a long line of cane growers. His grandfather started cutting cane in and farming it in For three generations the Courtice men have lived and worked at Sunnyside, a nearly hectare farm in the Woongarra region southeast of Bundaberg.

And for almost all of those days, sugar has been a mainstay of life. Now 64, Courtice remembers school holidays spent cutting green cane in the fields. Sitting on his front veranda and nursing a mug of Bushells sweetened only with honey, he explains that as he got older he became increasingly concerned about the relationship between sugar consumption and dental cavities.

Courtice has the weathered skin of a farmer — his hands are tanned and calloused, with crescents of dirt under the fingernails — but his teeth have suffered worse deterioration. He soon realised cavities were the least of his concerns. As the research rolled in, Courtice became convinced that eating too much refined sugar was also linked to diabetes and weight gain. Cane plants are no longer welcome at Sunnyside farm; the last crop was ploughed out in November , and the red-soil paddocks are now dedicated to growing potatoes.

This comparison between sugar and proven toxins like tobacco or alcohol has gained prominence in the last few years. The Bitter Truth has clocked up more than five million views. If Lustig is right, then everything you thought you knew about obesity and dieting is wrong.

His message is not that all calories are equal: He says sugar, not fat, is the main culprit in obesity, type 2 diabetes, heart disease and even some cancers. Table sugar is a combination of two sugars, glucose and fructose.

Glucose is common in nature, and all our cells are equipped to use it for energy. But fructose, the much sweeter part of the substance, is relatively rare in nature, found mainly in honey and ripe fruit, and is metabolised almost exclusively in the liver. Human trials into the health effects of fructose consumption are continuing — including in Australia at the University of Newcastle — and the verdict is still out.

All this media attention has focused on the health effects of sugar while largely overlooking the industry that produces it. What effect, if any, are these criticisms having on that industry? The Australian sugar industry was built on the indentured labour — some say slave labour — of South Sea Islanders.

In another field, I watch as a cane harvester roars into view. We walk up stairs onto a raised platform and watch the bins full of cane being weighed.

The cane juice is pumped away for processing into raw sugar. Very little is wasted — the fibre is burnt for energy, the molasses is used to make rum or feedstock for animals and even the residual mud from the cane stalks is sent back to the fields to be used as fertiliser.

But this positive side is overshadowed by something more sinister: This pervasiveness makes it hard to know how much sugar peole are really eating. Outspoken economist Rory Robertson questioned the validity of the underlying Australian Bureau of Statistics ABS data, which had been discontinued from due to reliability concerns.

But I can say a few things for sure. I walk around the convenience store, figuring out what I can buy and still stay within that miserly quota. When I arrive, the place is packed. On a tour of the distillery, I learn that Millaquin Mill was established in , but by the wells storing molasses were overflowing, and something needed to be done.

Health experts have recently called for sugar to be taxed in the same way as alcohol, and for the same reasons. In , Lustig — aforementioned star of Sugar: The Bitter Truth — and his colleagues published a comment piece in the scientific journal Nature. Following this logic, some countries and cities around the world have already introduced sugar taxes.

With mounting obesity rates, the pressure on government to investigate this option is increasing. But the beverage industry is a formidable foe. I found little support for a sugar tax during my time in Bundaberg. One objection to a sugar tax raised by many critics is that the comparison between sugar and alcohol or tobacco is flawed.

Does all of this spell doom for Australian cane farmers? Despite a history of protectionism, the Australian sugar industry is now largely deregulated and unsubsidised, which makes it highly exposed to fluctuations in the global sugar price. Yet the list of issues — a rift between growers and millers over marketing arrangements, worries about electricity price hikes and gripes over sugar being excluded from recent free trade agreements — are all to do with market competitiveness.

The crucial factor is that Australia sells most of its sugar to Asia. Even if demand weakened in Asia, that still might not kill the industry. On my tour around Bundaberg, I learned that the cane plant is remarkably resilient: This article appeared in Ed of The Big Issue magazine.

And why do people keep coming back for more monkey business? It was the early s and Wray was hoping for Clark Gable. What she got, of course, was a gorilla. It is going to be big on many, many levels. He may be 80 years old next year, but Kong is still considered bankable.

Like all myths, there are variations each time the story is told, but certain key components must remain. John Guillermin director of the remake , Peter Jackson director of the version and, it seems, Kramer all agree that in the telling of this myth, certain things have to happen. A man with dubious motives must travel to a remote island on a ship. A blonde must be on that ship.

A giant ape must capture the blonde when they get to the island. The blonde must escape from the ape, aided by a heroic man from the crew. The ape must be captured and taken to Manhattan to be presented as a freak show. He must escape from his chains, embark on a devastating rampage through Manhattan to reclaim the blonde.

When he finds her, he must climb the tallest building, holding her in his fist. On the top of the building, he must be shot down by airplanes. A childhood fascination with gorillas, combined with the success of jungle and horror films in the early 20th century, inspired him to create a story about a havoc-wreaking ape.

In a letter to a friend describing the genesis of his ideas for the film, Cooper explained that key elements in the story hinged on their capacity for maximum visual impact: My very original idea was to place him on the top of the Empire State Building and have him killed by airplanes. Commentators argued that any society that sees woman-taken-against-her-will as a wonderfully entertaining premise is a disturbed one.

Another key to the enduring fascination with Kong is that, unusually, the myth invites us to sympathise not just with human characters, but also a monstrous and violent outsider. It was beauty killed the beast. He is, after all, a man-eating, metropolis-wrecking monster whose demise restores order to a ravaged city. Times have changed; the public is not going to swallow a tale of wanton animal cruelty. But as the story has settled on a fixed moral position in its remakes, it has lost much of its mystery.

In the show, it will be sung as Ann sits with Kong on the top of the building in the final moments of his life. The violins played, Hannaford opened her mouth and, in a low, soulful voice, sang an exquisitely sad and haunting song. When the song ended, the applause was long and loud.

And, regardless of whether or not Cooper designed the scene purely for spectacle, there is something devastating about the image of the once-powerful Kong emasculated by machines in the presence of the woman he adores. But why is this story timeless? When director Merian C Cooper first approached actress Fay Wray about the possibility of starring in his upcoming movie, he was vague about the details. Daniel Kramer, the year-old American director of the show, described the tale of girl and gorilla in epic and rapturous terms: Whatever the story means, it has made the figure of Kong a 21st-century multimedia star.

The original movie sparked two remakes and as well as sequels, spin-offs — including the cult Japanese film, King Kong vs Godzilla — comics, video games and theme-park rides before anyone had the idea of putting him on the stage. And, while Kramer might see beauty in the monkey, others can see dollar signs.

Kramer spoke of King Kong in terms of a myth. The King Kong story is deeply strange and unsettling — and lends itself to all sorts of theories. By the time he pitched his idea for a movie about a giant gorilla to Depression-era executives at the RKO motion-picture studios, Cooper had already served as a World War I bomber pilot, been a prisoner of war, written autobiographical pieces for The New York Times and made two ethnographic documentary feature films — one following a peasant farmer in Thailand.

As well as directing the film, Cooper co-wrote the script, oversaw its pioneering technological advances in stop-motion animation and appeared as one of the pilots who shoots down Kong. Back in , the film was a smash-hit, saving RKO from bankruptcy and enjoying a mostly positive critical reception. In an early review for The Nation , writer William Troy argued that it tapped into a unique, possibly sinister, American addiction to spectacle and superlative: King Kong was made during the nadir of American race relations, an era of lynchings, segregation and expressions of white supremacy.

Given established stereotypes of the time — which treated the African-American male as subhuman and predatory — it is easy to see why King Kong has been interpreted by many as a profoundly racist film. The obsessive screen time devoted to the gorgeous Wray screaming and squirming in the hairy fist of her captor — and the early advertising campaign that fetishised this image — seem designed to titillate.

Other chin-strokers have drawn longer bows. Remakes of the film brought opportunities for writers to revisit the original myth and reflect on its mutations. King Kong , it seems, can mean everything and nothing. King Kong had to be converted into a tear-jerker for its own good. In the final scenes, Dwan pleads with Kong to hold her in his hand so the planes will stop shooting at him, but Kong — now occupying the role of noble savage — refuses to place his beloved in danger, and seals his fate as monkey-martyr.

Just as Kong has become a more sentimental figure, the role of the leading lady has also changed with time. Spotlit in the centre of the stage, Hannaford stood in a long white dress, requisite blonde locks falling loosely on one shoulder. How is it possible that this bizarre scenario — a woman stuck on a skyscraper with a ginormous gorilla — inspired such superb songwriting and such a stirring performance? Or is it something else altogether? Is King Kong the story of an American addiction, a foot genital, an ambitious economic stimulus package, or is it even — and this is a neglected but credible theory — the straightforward story of a truly awesome ape, so big he can stamp on taxis?

The only ones who know his name these days are Trivial Pursuit buffs with a special interest in s movies.

Meryl Streep, meanwhile, also has three acting Oscars and is nominated again this year, although Our Cate Blanchett is the hot favourite. And another slap in the snout to Miss Piggy, who has always had more star wattage than Elizabeth Taylor sporting her biggest rocks yet, still, has suffered the indignity of being exploited occasionally as light relief during tedious Oscars ceremonies without ever being given her proper due.

But she has mostly maintained a dignified silence on this touchy subject, unlike many of her colleagues in showbiz, who have made an art form out of bagging the awards and the ceremony. Perhaps, he suggested, all nominees should be made to don tights and recite something from Hamlet.

The much-awarded Streep, similarly, reportedly once complained: This blue is better than that blue? Eighteen nominations proves that. Musing on possible cause and effect here, Hoffman once noted: There are ways to get around such things.

Michael Caine is not the only bankable senior citizen. The reverse does not always apply. Both had that slightly sheepish expression that comes from knowing that, whatever it says on the movie poster, they are not the real stars of the show. The new movie provides work for, among others, Tina Fey and Ricky Gervais. But the producers know who has the real crowd-appeal.

There should be no more slights, no more fobbing off Kermit and his leading lady with soon forgotten presenter spots for one of the less illustrious award categories. Babe even had a cocktail invented in his honour: A lesser star might have turned lime green with envy.

Owners of pet pigs then included Clooney and Luke Perry. The latter was quoted as saying: This helps to explain why nobody talks about Perry anymore.

Babe, meanwhile, languishes in the back bins of video stores. But the ageless Miss Piggy, like all her colleagues, remains ready for her close-up. But, again, a unique star has been subbed. The thing about awards shows — any kind of competition, really — is that there are always more losers than winners. This is obvious at the biggest show of them all, the Academy Awards, which will be held in Los Angeles and beamed to a waiting world early next month.

For every gleeful winner looking stunned, there are a handful of also-rans doing some of the best acting of their lives, trying to appear pleased for someone else. The Oscars, as they are best known, have a credibility problem. They are famous for egregious omissions. Citizen Kane , for example, still tops many polls of best film ever, but missed out on a Best Picture Oscar. Walter Brennan, however, is in exalted company. But Miss Piggy is a glaring omission from the shortlists and, probably, also the red carpet on the night.

There are always, always, shameful oversights in what is rather a mysterious voting process — by members of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, which was founded in LA in , with only 36 members and Douglas Fairbanks Sr as the first president.

In , for example, the year when a cute young pig named Babe snuffled into her spotlight, Miss Piggy exchanged a bit of banter with presenter Whoopi Goldberg.

In , nominated this time for Kramer vs. Then he won, and suddenly he was up on stage saying how proud he was. Joan Fontaine, winner of the Best Actress gong for Suspicion in , later declared: Streep can get away with this because, deep down, she knows Academy members love her.

Yet still she is without that lusted-after short 34cm and overweight close to 4kg statuette, which is lacking private parts. Did it occur to nobody in the Academy that Miss Piggy and her colleagues are now eligible for, and would be worthy recipients of, a Lifetime Achievement Award?

Statler and Waldorf, a veteran pair of troupers who saddle up again in Muppets Most Wanted, have been overlooked again and again by myopic Hollywood executives. Big names and reputations mean nothing to them — for proof, jump on your favourite search engine [no free ads here] and look for the clip featuring Statler, Waldorf and Milton Berle. All Muppets have demonstrated an easy professionalism with human actors.

What the Muppets most want now is respect — both for their impressive body of work and individual achievements: After all, history is on their side — especially her side. That cartoon, incidentally, was Three Little Pigs.

Then I succumbed to the sun and napped there on the grass, awake to my good fortune. I boiled down their words into three facts: But then, with help from agencies, welfare, friends or family, they find a stable home, even if the bills remain a stretch and life a stress. If you think about homelessness, some of these people come to mind: And then these facts evaporated altogether. Albert has been homeless most his life; Dee probably will be soon. It announced two ambitious targets for Two months later, the government scrounged billions more for social housing, as part of the recession-busting stimulus package.

I draw my coat tight and shudder, too, about the holding pattern I have entered. He is 38 years old, and unfailingly polite. He offers me coffee when I arrive and fetches me a newspaper while he paces upstairs to make it. They had been on the computers playing Facebook poker. Under the state government scheme, international experts live in Adelaide briefly, meet influential people and make policy recommendations.

In , after several years securing donations, investments and grants, she bought the Times Square Hotel in Manhattan, a derelict storey art deco building. She had it refurbished, and when it reopened, the old hotel provided housing for people: The lobby had a marble staircase.

Its philosophy is that chronic homelessness is solvable. Almost nine out of 10 residents stay put. And no one can object to that. Emergency shelters sustain homelessness, rather than end it. Instead, Haggerty and others pushed for the reverse: It once housed a printing press and, briefly, a nightclub.

For the last month, it has housed Albert. Among other things that continue to upset him, he read that not long after he was born, his mother, a diabetic and bad alcoholic, left town without him.

Her partner told people the baby had died. Someone made an anonymous call and Albert was taken away. Never had a proper family. She speaks fast, in staccato sentences without pronouns. The birds chirp slowly and every 10 minutes a train toots, stretched out along the line. Yet somehow, the dwelling seemed to have diminished her big laugh and limbs. So had that removed and I got all-cleared end of January. I was a warehouse manager, travelled interstate.

But with the injury, not allowed to do that anymore. Turned 40 last month. Find a new calling at 40? With no experience, no nothing? Then I hear myself ask: Are they just bums? These are her luxuries. She keeps them going because an energy auditor from Kildonan UnitingCare explained they only cost one cent per day. One of its services is to help people overburdened with energy bills understand how to reduce their usage. After the advisor visited Dee, he negotiated a payment plan for the money she owed the power company.

Avramopoulos, who has dark, sparky eyes and leaves a residue of energy even after she exits a conversation, grew up in the region serviced by her organisation. Recently, Avramopoulos told a Victorian inquiry into child protection that the number of people requesting financial assistance from Kildonan had doubled in the past five years. The next week, three more presented with eviction notices.

All the charities I contacted for this article told me housing stress has become an increasingly mainstream concern. Before she wakes up. Talk to my dog. I go to counselling for depression and anxiety. I started smoking cigarettes. And I know this, too: Burns has a presence at once cherubic and stoic.

Burns walks me through their facilities, past the dining room, showers, laundry and storage room, to an art and education centre, an op shop, a lounge and a bank of computers. More Common Ground-style apartments are under construction in Sydney, Brisbane and Hobart, and a large building opened last year in Melbourne.

I walk to visit him on a Saturday. The common room is closed at weekends. He shows me to his bedsit on the second floor, apologising several times for the mess. The following day, they booked him on a course to get his forklift ticket. But when I arrive, her hair is already dark red.

It looks good, and she appears several years younger. She returns to her couch in the darkened living room to continue watching the mid-morning TV news with the sound down, arms crossed in her loose fleece-lined jacket, the three lava-lamps flowing. It is her face that turns grey now, as I ask her again about all those worries. The payment plans brokered by Kildonan for the utility bills have expired and disconnection notices came for the gas and electricity.

No birthday cake, no dog food! The rent was higher, but it was the only one she could find that allowed pets. But around the country, waiting lists for public housing run to the tens of thousands. As decades have passed and the population and economy have grown, governments have not provided the public housing to match.

Many not-for-profit housing associations received balance sheet boosts they should be able to leverage for ongoing investment. The National Housing Supply Council, a government body, estimates that there was a national shortage of about , homes in mid, the number having doubled in the preceding year, while prices for existing houses rose sharply.

About housing affordability, poverty, education and income inequality. Structural causes that fuse with the vagaries of personal and social circumstances, chance and mischance. I learn of the thousands of agencies, services and workers implementing a web of policies and tailored responses. Albert has a home, a support plan, and his own plans. Still, she remains hopeful. Housing is one of the critical areas that can act as an intervening force. I notice that she was quieter the second time I visited: Her voice is soft on the recording, and even though I turn it up as loud as I can, she vanishes often in the noise of the traffic, disappearing among the trucks, the trams and the pulsing crossings.

But she always asks, have you got a job, have you got a job? His website is michaelbgreen. It is being republished as part of our countdown to our 20th Birthday. Stay tuned for more great content from the last two decades.

As for Dee and Albert, I still think of them often. The first time I meet Albert, all I notice is his hair. I see him from behind, when his social worker points him out on a computer, playing poker on Facebook in the common room of his new supportive housing. He has the kind of hair you notice: But Albert puts me at ease in a moment. While we talk, a young man sitting two computers away starts coughing uncontrollably.

Unnerved, I glance towards him; Albert sees this, reassures me, and then gently checks on the kid. Albert has warm eyes and manners, but his nose is off-kilter and his chin angles the other way. The middle and index fingers on his left hand are stained where he holds his cigarettes. One year ago, he was sleeping rough. Tomorrow, however, is payday. She and her daughter are booked in to give blood. Since February, her rent has trumped her income. Dee introduces me to Brandy, her big handsome dog — a Japanese Akita, a breed known for loyalty.

In early autumn, the editors of The Big Issue asked me to write about housing and homelessness. In the next fortnight, I called charities and peak bodies, more and more of them, because each one recommended another.

I boiled down their words into three facts:. More than , Australians are homeless on any given night. Most of these people experience homelessness only briefly. About one in eight, however, reel from place to place, service to service; repelled and repelling, like magnets the wrong way round.

After I found out these things, I found Albert and Dee. In , at the height of global financial panic, just months after Wall Street collapsed, the federal government released a policy white paper called The Road Home. For this week at least, Albert orbits in a universe comprised of three core elements: When I arrived, Albert was out the front having a smoke with his friend, Alan, who has a small moustache and a furrowed brow.

Albert talks about his own, more tangible finances: So, in , Albert decided to try his luck in Adelaide. There were onsite counsellors and common areas — a library, a roof-deck garden, a computer lab, an art studio, a medical clinic, an exercise room and laundry facilities.

The organisation Haggerty founded, Common Ground Community, now manages 12 buildings with nearly units. Housing that comes with linked support services is more effective — and cheaper — than leaving people on the street and relying on police and emergency services to deal with them.

For many charity workers, however, Haggerty had a confronting message: She proposed dramatic change. Common Ground Adelaide was launched in , mirroring the New York model. In April, the organisation opened its second premises — a red-brick, heritage building overlooking a park in the Adelaide CBD, retrofitted with 52 apartments. The building is bright and airy, equipped with its own part-time medical and dental clinic and a worker who coordinates regular activities for the residents, things like gardening and ten-pin bowling.

But as I walked home that day, my footsteps wavered. As I listen, I picture her two-bedroom unit, neatly kept, but flimsy like a cardboard box. The tape continues and I recall the scene: It was through Kildonan that I met her. After the launch, she chatted in the foyer while assorted charity workers milled around sandwich platters.

In her lounge room, Dee tells me she thinks about her rent before she goes to sleep, and before she wakes up. Dee is crying, wiping tears away from her cheeks with the sleeve of her purple windcheater. I walked back to the train knowing this: Hutt Street serves breakfast to about people and lunches to about people every weekday.

Burns has reservations about the change. Even so, the approach has spread throughout the country, both in pre-existing scattered housing and in new dwellings. But it is the South Australian government that has made the biggest changes, across all its housing services. The same goes for Albert. I think his room is tidy. Albert pulls his hair into a ponytail and starts doing the dishes, standing neatly with his legs together, half-turned towards me while we talk about his plans, long-term and short.

He wants to enrol in a bachelor degree in Aboriginal Studies in Music next year at the university. I visit Dee again. Before long, the questions taste sour in my mouth. Upset, Dee directs conversation through her dog, who is lying at her feet. She has long been on waiting lists for public housing, and for a housing co-op in which she would pay below-market rent. The tenants have shifted from low-paid workers to the most marginalised in society — carers, single mothers, the elderly, disabled or chronically unemployed.

When population growth outstrips investment in housing, infrastructure and services, the economy still grows and most people become richer, but we are subsidised by the suffering of the poor.

For months I pore over books and documents about homelessness. I thought about this paragraph the morning I read the rich list. As I walk, her voice comes and goes: I can come across quite good…make a joke and laugh. Michael Green published a follow-up article to 'Cracks in the Walls' on his blog in February Do crossword compilers have a secret handshake?

Which do you go by? It can be used to describe any crossword enthusiast, setter or solver, and I am definitely both. Gradually the mysteries are unlocked and the secret codes and recipes reveal themselves.

Plus, two minds are better than one. Is cruciverbalism a calling? So I gave it a go and discovered I had a knack for it. Do you have a weekly routine of crosswords and puzzles you like to solve? Do you have peculiar rites, customs, secret handshake etc? It implies some kind of mixing or change is taking place. Unches are the squares in a crossword that only belong to one word. That is, the non-intersecting squares.

The simplest advice I can give is to try not to be drawn into the surface meaning of the clue. In most cases this is totally irrelevant. There are a few fancy words for the people who put together crosswords: When did you first discover your love of crossword puzzles? My mum introduced me to cryptics when I was a teenager. Then I discovered his blog , where he sets fun weekly challenges in devising clues.

Do you spend a lot of time solving the puzzles of other compilers? I really like the cryptic puzzles from the UK — they did invent crosswords after all. I try to do the Times cryptic most days, and the Guardian crosswords are free online and have a good range of compilers and difficulty levels. Do you have any particular compiler heroes?

Is there a community of crossword setters in Australia? An anagrind is the word in a cryptic clue that indicates the solver should make the word s beside it into an anagram. As a solver, have you ever committed regrettable acts in a fit of crossword-induced frustration? Can you give Big Issue readers some tips on solving cryptics?

Each clue generally has two parts — definition and wordplay. I have argued yes many times. But the truth is, I was happy to see you go. How could I study enough when I had to work as well? I was lonely, and missing my family. I mean, how could I be expected to form a close relationship with my own daughter, when the one with my mother was in tatters?

When you first saw my raw, red, scrawny body you told me your voice caught. You had everything prepared for me at home. Lace trim on the cradle. A slew of pink teddy bears. You so longed for your little princess. But you got me instead. And it only got worse as I got older. The harder you tried to establish a relationship, the more I pushed you away.

That is, of course, until my own daughter came along. I am so grateful for all those times you changed Amity, fed Amity and took Amity out for walks. For giving me those moments to breathe when it felt like I was suffocating under it all. The fact that Amity has grown into a happy, healthy three-year-old is something for which I have you, in no small part, to thank.

They heighten your experience of living, but destroy you in the process. But looking back, I realise now that there were times I destroyed parts of you. I just went in to tuck an extra blanket around her and I found her lying with her arm around that pink bunny you gave her for Christmas.

In this edition, two writers share stories about the relationships between mothers and daughters. I can still see you standing under the streetlight at the end of Carols by Candlelight, wiping your eyes, while the crowds streamed around you as they walked away from the beach.

I was scared, and I needed your help. Rather than asking you nicely, though, I demanded it. And when you hesitated, just for a second, I panicked.

But when I try to justify this history to myself, I find it much easier to blame it all on you and Dad moving away when I was Did I want you to remain in Victoria rather than move to Queensland? But when I began to find things hard on my own, I started to blame my inability to cope on you. The biggest thing I blamed you for, though, was the fear I felt when I was pregnant and I discovered my baby was going to be a girl. What really killed me, in those lonely moments when I was buying baby clothes by myself, is that you really wanted a daughter.

I had no idea that becoming a mother is so hard. And it was during some of my darkest days that you came to help me. The other day, Amity and I were scrolling through photos on my phone, when we came across one of you. Amity is asleep at the moment. See more at redbubble. The post showed a world map and ranked passports by the number of countries its owners can visit without a visa, or with a visa on arrival. The three least-powerful passports are those from Somalia, Iraq and Afghanistan.

All visitors must apply for a visa before travelling here. However, applicants from countries with high numbers of asylum seekers are much less likely to receive visas. It all comes back to risk; the risk that they might apply for asylum upon arrival. In October , Malaysia introduced stricter visas for people from high asylum source states after a request from the Australian Government. This was in line with the broader trend of attempting to stop asylum seekers at their source.

But a demographic shift takes place between the types of asylum seekers who travel on boats and those who travel on planes. The report counts non-illegal maritime arrival applications for asylum lodged by Chinese citizens, compared to from Afghani citizens.

This is important because, according to the UNHCR, the total number of refugees originating from Afghanistan is nearly 2. It is clear, however, that people attempt to travel to Australia by boat because air travel is not accessible to them. It is because they fall at the bottom of the list of passport power or, for those who are stateless, because any legal travel is impossible.

Yet, again and again, the public is told that the benefit of saving lives at sea outweighs these crimes. The universe of legitimate travel has been closed off to certain groups of people: They will do almost anything to find sanctuary in a new country. But, as journalist Angelica Neville discovers during her investigation in Indonesia, destination countries like Australia will go to even greater lengths to keep them out.

Now he is waiting to be resettled. He invited me into his home to meet some of his friends. We sit cross-legged on the carpeted floor, drinking tea, in the hot upstairs room. There are two fans, no windows and a plastic container full of plain white lollies.

I speak to Moheeba, an old Afghani man who tells me that, when he was young, nobody went to school because parents were worried their children would be eaten by wolves on the way. Moheeba had been a rock-breaker, and it looks as if the dust has settled permanently in the creases of his skin. One day, while working, he was kidnapped by the Taliban. Once free, he fled across the porous border to Pakistan. In Karachi, Moheeba organised for a smuggler to fly him to Jakarta.

That was four years ago. He has also been recognised as a refugee by the UNHCR, but now he is waiting for an embassy to accept his application so he can resettle. The hardest thing about waiting in Jakarta is the hunger and the uncertainty. This applies to any asylum seekers who arrived in Indonesia after 1 July The Australian Government also announced it would reduce the intake of refugees who arrived in Indonesia before July The smugglers who arranged for him to enter Indonesia took their fake documents back.

Visas play an often-ignored role in preventing people wishing to seek asylum from travelling legitimately. He explains how countries use visa restrictions as a deterrent: This is one reason refugees use irregular means of travel, such as boats.

The trend of introducing visas to target and prevent the movement of specific nationalities emerged in the s during a spike in asylum-seeker numbers. This was along with other preventative measures such as governments fining airlines if they transport anyone without proper documentation.

Between and , onshore claims for asylum were made in Australia. This rose to 27, between and Part of this increase was the result of a one-off offer to consider Chinese students living in Australia for refugee status after the Tiananmen Square massacre. He also notes a demographic change that occurred at this time: Cheaper air travel meant that not only did numbers of asylum seekers increase, but people seeking asylum started coming from increasingly farther afield. Border controls became a big deal.

They tightened and expanded in reach. Australia and other major destination states go to considerable effort to prevent potential asylum seekers arriving by attempting to stop them at their source. Part of this is making it more difficult for potential asylum seekers to travel by plane.

Australia has a universal visa requirement. Additionally, the Australian Government lobbies other countries in the region to introduce stricter visa requirements as a way of preventing people reaching Australia. Of course, people still fly to Australia by plane and apply for asylum, usually on tourist or student visas.

Other factors play a role, of course, including perceived security risks and diplomatic priorities. Again and again human rights abuses have been exposed in Australian-run detention centres. Oxfam estimates there are around billionaires in the world. But rather than preaching revolution or class warfare, Oxfam has cast these billionaires as those with the answer to some pressing problems. Not their total wealth; just the income from And who ever heard of billionaires sharing their wealth around?

This is not about faith or religion, Gates has said: That reality sets an obvious course for me and my family: Since then her personal wealth has soared. So, too, has the number of headlines about her, few of which would have pleased her. If she did decide to give it all away, well, the ripples would spread wide. Even wider than those Pilbara landscapes she loves. Lifestyles of the rich and famous have more immediate appeal than, say, everyday doings of ordinary people.

When things go wrong in the lives of the rich — as happened last year with a Rinehart family dispute, played out in public to the dismay of those involved — it becomes a kind of spectator sport. There is a measure of reassurance there, too: What has not increased, however, is any perception of her greater involvement in philanthropy — though perhaps she is just keeping it quiet.

Despite the cover of this edition, there is more to this time of the year than chocolate. My mind is on higher things. For this is the time of year when it is impossible to avoid religious questions. Even sporting codes accept that bumps and biffo must temporarily take a back seat. Well, some of them, that is. The government is hoping to attract an extra , visitor nights from a proposed Auckland convention centre.

Don't you mean labour supporters and the greenies? They are often the lazy, uneducated and emotional bunch you know? What is the problem? Even now companies, that are able to shift, are eyeing up NZ as a better place to be. Leave it alone peeps, especially you Mr Bollard. I will be one of the lucky ones leaving for Melbourne later this year. I say that because im here in Chch where there in no centre and its pretty dead here in the weekend.

You mean the rest of us are lucky you're going? By the way Ch. We are a low wage economy with incomes stagnant. Costs of electricity, insurance ,rates are all going thru the roof. House prices in NZ are a national scandal that the government has chosen to ignore. If I were young and had a trade I would be off to Aus tomorrow. At least we can sell it to the Chinese and make some money on it first is a better policy I would think. The only poll that counts is the one which shows us walking away from NZ now.

This is not great, but where are the ideas from the Greens and Labour to turn things round and boost incomes. All we ever hear from them is complaints about inequalities in society, boosting social welfare, and the risks to the environment from economic development.

If we are going to grow the economy so that we can compete with Australia then income and wealth has to be generated - not just shuffled from one interest group to another. So what hope is there for us in NZ? Our son and family left for Oz last July, moved by Aust employer, good home and job over there.

Lasted 6 mths, back here to even better job, climate better, schools better, much happier. Plus we get to see the grandkids!

Joining an international investment bank which grabbed him with both arms when he was interviewed last month. Partner had the same result Physio. Like "cozzie" "taker" jobs that do not replace anything you consume.

Some justification would be nice. I would have thought that after 35 odd consecutive years of current account deficits, we could conclude that NZ is the very definition of a "taker" nation. You're onto it Aussie ozzy, couldn't have put it better myself. And more good news, legislation is now being drafted that will demand any NZ'er wanting to come back pays a "catch up" health, education and welfare tax BEFORE they can come back.

Actually i agree with you on the last part, NZ haemorrhage money to foreign tourists and immigrants that just rip off the NZ health and welfare system before bailing on their debts. I do like the idea of the legislation, seems fair enough. I doubt it will get even through a first reading though. How do you apply it to the 40k immigrants that enter NZ each year?

your comfort I'll

Don't you mean labour supporters and the greenies? They are often the lazy, uneducated and emotional bunch you know? What is the problem? Even now companies, that are able to shift, are eyeing up NZ as a better place to be. Leave it alone peeps, especially you Mr Bollard. I will be one of the lucky ones leaving for Melbourne later this year. I say that because im here in Chch where there in no centre and its pretty dead here in the weekend. You mean the rest of us are lucky you're going?

By the way Ch. We are a low wage economy with incomes stagnant. Costs of electricity, insurance ,rates are all going thru the roof. House prices in NZ are a national scandal that the government has chosen to ignore. If I were young and had a trade I would be off to Aus tomorrow. At least we can sell it to the Chinese and make some money on it first is a better policy I would think. The only poll that counts is the one which shows us walking away from NZ now.

This is not great, but where are the ideas from the Greens and Labour to turn things round and boost incomes. All we ever hear from them is complaints about inequalities in society, boosting social welfare, and the risks to the environment from economic development.

If we are going to grow the economy so that we can compete with Australia then income and wealth has to be generated - not just shuffled from one interest group to another. So what hope is there for us in NZ? Our son and family left for Oz last July, moved by Aust employer, good home and job over there. Lasted 6 mths, back here to even better job, climate better, schools better, much happier.

Plus we get to see the grandkids! Joining an international investment bank which grabbed him with both arms when he was interviewed last month. Partner had the same result Physio. Like "cozzie" "taker" jobs that do not replace anything you consume.

Some justification would be nice. I would have thought that after 35 odd consecutive years of current account deficits, we could conclude that NZ is the very definition of a "taker" nation. You're onto it Aussie ozzy, couldn't have put it better myself. And more good news, legislation is now being drafted that will demand any NZ'er wanting to come back pays a "catch up" health, education and welfare tax BEFORE they can come back.

Actually i agree with you on the last part, NZ haemorrhage money to foreign tourists and immigrants that just rip off the NZ health and welfare system before bailing on their debts.

I do like the idea of the legislation, seems fair enough. I doubt it will get even through a first reading though. How do you apply it to the 40k immigrants that enter NZ each year?

Record exodus of Kiwis to Australia. This article appeared in Ed of The Big Issue magazine. And why do people keep coming back for more monkey business? It was the early s and Wray was hoping for Clark Gable. What she got, of course, was a gorilla. It is going to be big on many, many levels. He may be 80 years old next year, but Kong is still considered bankable. Like all myths, there are variations each time the story is told, but certain key components must remain.

John Guillermin director of the remake , Peter Jackson director of the version and, it seems, Kramer all agree that in the telling of this myth, certain things have to happen.

A man with dubious motives must travel to a remote island on a ship. A blonde must be on that ship. A giant ape must capture the blonde when they get to the island.

The blonde must escape from the ape, aided by a heroic man from the crew. The ape must be captured and taken to Manhattan to be presented as a freak show. He must escape from his chains, embark on a devastating rampage through Manhattan to reclaim the blonde. When he finds her, he must climb the tallest building, holding her in his fist. On the top of the building, he must be shot down by airplanes.

A childhood fascination with gorillas, combined with the success of jungle and horror films in the early 20th century, inspired him to create a story about a havoc-wreaking ape. In a letter to a friend describing the genesis of his ideas for the film, Cooper explained that key elements in the story hinged on their capacity for maximum visual impact: My very original idea was to place him on the top of the Empire State Building and have him killed by airplanes. Commentators argued that any society that sees woman-taken-against-her-will as a wonderfully entertaining premise is a disturbed one.

Another key to the enduring fascination with Kong is that, unusually, the myth invites us to sympathise not just with human characters, but also a monstrous and violent outsider. It was beauty killed the beast. He is, after all, a man-eating, metropolis-wrecking monster whose demise restores order to a ravaged city. Times have changed; the public is not going to swallow a tale of wanton animal cruelty.

But as the story has settled on a fixed moral position in its remakes, it has lost much of its mystery. In the show, it will be sung as Ann sits with Kong on the top of the building in the final moments of his life. The violins played, Hannaford opened her mouth and, in a low, soulful voice, sang an exquisitely sad and haunting song.

When the song ended, the applause was long and loud. And, regardless of whether or not Cooper designed the scene purely for spectacle, there is something devastating about the image of the once-powerful Kong emasculated by machines in the presence of the woman he adores.

But why is this story timeless? When director Merian C Cooper first approached actress Fay Wray about the possibility of starring in his upcoming movie, he was vague about the details.

Daniel Kramer, the year-old American director of the show, described the tale of girl and gorilla in epic and rapturous terms: Whatever the story means, it has made the figure of Kong a 21st-century multimedia star.

The original movie sparked two remakes and as well as sequels, spin-offs — including the cult Japanese film, King Kong vs Godzilla — comics, video games and theme-park rides before anyone had the idea of putting him on the stage. And, while Kramer might see beauty in the monkey, others can see dollar signs. Kramer spoke of King Kong in terms of a myth. The King Kong story is deeply strange and unsettling — and lends itself to all sorts of theories. By the time he pitched his idea for a movie about a giant gorilla to Depression-era executives at the RKO motion-picture studios, Cooper had already served as a World War I bomber pilot, been a prisoner of war, written autobiographical pieces for The New York Times and made two ethnographic documentary feature films — one following a peasant farmer in Thailand.

As well as directing the film, Cooper co-wrote the script, oversaw its pioneering technological advances in stop-motion animation and appeared as one of the pilots who shoots down Kong. Back in , the film was a smash-hit, saving RKO from bankruptcy and enjoying a mostly positive critical reception. In an early review for The Nation , writer William Troy argued that it tapped into a unique, possibly sinister, American addiction to spectacle and superlative: King Kong was made during the nadir of American race relations, an era of lynchings, segregation and expressions of white supremacy.

Given established stereotypes of the time — which treated the African-American male as subhuman and predatory — it is easy to see why King Kong has been interpreted by many as a profoundly racist film. The obsessive screen time devoted to the gorgeous Wray screaming and squirming in the hairy fist of her captor — and the early advertising campaign that fetishised this image — seem designed to titillate.

Other chin-strokers have drawn longer bows. Remakes of the film brought opportunities for writers to revisit the original myth and reflect on its mutations. King Kong , it seems, can mean everything and nothing. King Kong had to be converted into a tear-jerker for its own good. In the final scenes, Dwan pleads with Kong to hold her in his hand so the planes will stop shooting at him, but Kong — now occupying the role of noble savage — refuses to place his beloved in danger, and seals his fate as monkey-martyr.

Just as Kong has become a more sentimental figure, the role of the leading lady has also changed with time. Spotlit in the centre of the stage, Hannaford stood in a long white dress, requisite blonde locks falling loosely on one shoulder. How is it possible that this bizarre scenario — a woman stuck on a skyscraper with a ginormous gorilla — inspired such superb songwriting and such a stirring performance?

Or is it something else altogether? Is King Kong the story of an American addiction, a foot genital, an ambitious economic stimulus package, or is it even — and this is a neglected but credible theory — the straightforward story of a truly awesome ape, so big he can stamp on taxis? The only ones who know his name these days are Trivial Pursuit buffs with a special interest in s movies. Meryl Streep, meanwhile, also has three acting Oscars and is nominated again this year, although Our Cate Blanchett is the hot favourite.

And another slap in the snout to Miss Piggy, who has always had more star wattage than Elizabeth Taylor sporting her biggest rocks yet, still, has suffered the indignity of being exploited occasionally as light relief during tedious Oscars ceremonies without ever being given her proper due.

But she has mostly maintained a dignified silence on this touchy subject, unlike many of her colleagues in showbiz, who have made an art form out of bagging the awards and the ceremony. Perhaps, he suggested, all nominees should be made to don tights and recite something from Hamlet. The much-awarded Streep, similarly, reportedly once complained: This blue is better than that blue? Eighteen nominations proves that.

Musing on possible cause and effect here, Hoffman once noted: There are ways to get around such things. Michael Caine is not the only bankable senior citizen. The reverse does not always apply. Both had that slightly sheepish expression that comes from knowing that, whatever it says on the movie poster, they are not the real stars of the show.

The new movie provides work for, among others, Tina Fey and Ricky Gervais. But the producers know who has the real crowd-appeal. There should be no more slights, no more fobbing off Kermit and his leading lady with soon forgotten presenter spots for one of the less illustrious award categories.

Babe even had a cocktail invented in his honour: A lesser star might have turned lime green with envy.

Owners of pet pigs then included Clooney and Luke Perry. The latter was quoted as saying: This helps to explain why nobody talks about Perry anymore. Babe, meanwhile, languishes in the back bins of video stores. But the ageless Miss Piggy, like all her colleagues, remains ready for her close-up.

But, again, a unique star has been subbed. The thing about awards shows — any kind of competition, really — is that there are always more losers than winners. This is obvious at the biggest show of them all, the Academy Awards, which will be held in Los Angeles and beamed to a waiting world early next month. For every gleeful winner looking stunned, there are a handful of also-rans doing some of the best acting of their lives, trying to appear pleased for someone else.

The Oscars, as they are best known, have a credibility problem. They are famous for egregious omissions. Citizen Kane , for example, still tops many polls of best film ever, but missed out on a Best Picture Oscar. Walter Brennan, however, is in exalted company. But Miss Piggy is a glaring omission from the shortlists and, probably, also the red carpet on the night. There are always, always, shameful oversights in what is rather a mysterious voting process — by members of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, which was founded in LA in , with only 36 members and Douglas Fairbanks Sr as the first president.

In , for example, the year when a cute young pig named Babe snuffled into her spotlight, Miss Piggy exchanged a bit of banter with presenter Whoopi Goldberg. In , nominated this time for Kramer vs. Then he won, and suddenly he was up on stage saying how proud he was. Joan Fontaine, winner of the Best Actress gong for Suspicion in , later declared: Streep can get away with this because, deep down, she knows Academy members love her.

Yet still she is without that lusted-after short 34cm and overweight close to 4kg statuette, which is lacking private parts. Did it occur to nobody in the Academy that Miss Piggy and her colleagues are now eligible for, and would be worthy recipients of, a Lifetime Achievement Award? Statler and Waldorf, a veteran pair of troupers who saddle up again in Muppets Most Wanted, have been overlooked again and again by myopic Hollywood executives.

Big names and reputations mean nothing to them — for proof, jump on your favourite search engine [no free ads here] and look for the clip featuring Statler, Waldorf and Milton Berle. All Muppets have demonstrated an easy professionalism with human actors. What the Muppets most want now is respect — both for their impressive body of work and individual achievements: After all, history is on their side — especially her side.

That cartoon, incidentally, was Three Little Pigs. Then I succumbed to the sun and napped there on the grass, awake to my good fortune. I boiled down their words into three facts: But then, with help from agencies, welfare, friends or family, they find a stable home, even if the bills remain a stretch and life a stress.

If you think about homelessness, some of these people come to mind: And then these facts evaporated altogether. Albert has been homeless most his life; Dee probably will be soon. It announced two ambitious targets for Two months later, the government scrounged billions more for social housing, as part of the recession-busting stimulus package.

I draw my coat tight and shudder, too, about the holding pattern I have entered. He is 38 years old, and unfailingly polite. He offers me coffee when I arrive and fetches me a newspaper while he paces upstairs to make it.

They had been on the computers playing Facebook poker. Under the state government scheme, international experts live in Adelaide briefly, meet influential people and make policy recommendations.

In , after several years securing donations, investments and grants, she bought the Times Square Hotel in Manhattan, a derelict storey art deco building. She had it refurbished, and when it reopened, the old hotel provided housing for people: The lobby had a marble staircase. Its philosophy is that chronic homelessness is solvable. Almost nine out of 10 residents stay put.

And no one can object to that. Emergency shelters sustain homelessness, rather than end it. Instead, Haggerty and others pushed for the reverse: It once housed a printing press and, briefly, a nightclub. For the last month, it has housed Albert. Among other things that continue to upset him, he read that not long after he was born, his mother, a diabetic and bad alcoholic, left town without him. Her partner told people the baby had died. Someone made an anonymous call and Albert was taken away.

Never had a proper family. She speaks fast, in staccato sentences without pronouns. The birds chirp slowly and every 10 minutes a train toots, stretched out along the line. Yet somehow, the dwelling seemed to have diminished her big laugh and limbs.

So had that removed and I got all-cleared end of January. I was a warehouse manager, travelled interstate. But with the injury, not allowed to do that anymore. Turned 40 last month. Find a new calling at 40? With no experience, no nothing? Then I hear myself ask: Are they just bums? These are her luxuries. She keeps them going because an energy auditor from Kildonan UnitingCare explained they only cost one cent per day.

One of its services is to help people overburdened with energy bills understand how to reduce their usage. After the advisor visited Dee, he negotiated a payment plan for the money she owed the power company. Avramopoulos, who has dark, sparky eyes and leaves a residue of energy even after she exits a conversation, grew up in the region serviced by her organisation. Recently, Avramopoulos told a Victorian inquiry into child protection that the number of people requesting financial assistance from Kildonan had doubled in the past five years.

The next week, three more presented with eviction notices. All the charities I contacted for this article told me housing stress has become an increasingly mainstream concern. Before she wakes up. Talk to my dog. I go to counselling for depression and anxiety. I started smoking cigarettes. And I know this, too: Burns has a presence at once cherubic and stoic.

Burns walks me through their facilities, past the dining room, showers, laundry and storage room, to an art and education centre, an op shop, a lounge and a bank of computers. More Common Ground-style apartments are under construction in Sydney, Brisbane and Hobart, and a large building opened last year in Melbourne. I walk to visit him on a Saturday. The common room is closed at weekends.

He shows me to his bedsit on the second floor, apologising several times for the mess. The following day, they booked him on a course to get his forklift ticket. But when I arrive, her hair is already dark red. It looks good, and she appears several years younger. She returns to her couch in the darkened living room to continue watching the mid-morning TV news with the sound down, arms crossed in her loose fleece-lined jacket, the three lava-lamps flowing.

It is her face that turns grey now, as I ask her again about all those worries. The payment plans brokered by Kildonan for the utility bills have expired and disconnection notices came for the gas and electricity.

No birthday cake, no dog food! The rent was higher, but it was the only one she could find that allowed pets. But around the country, waiting lists for public housing run to the tens of thousands. As decades have passed and the population and economy have grown, governments have not provided the public housing to match.

Many not-for-profit housing associations received balance sheet boosts they should be able to leverage for ongoing investment.

The National Housing Supply Council, a government body, estimates that there was a national shortage of about , homes in mid, the number having doubled in the preceding year, while prices for existing houses rose sharply.

About housing affordability, poverty, education and income inequality. Structural causes that fuse with the vagaries of personal and social circumstances, chance and mischance.

I learn of the thousands of agencies, services and workers implementing a web of policies and tailored responses. Albert has a home, a support plan, and his own plans. Still, she remains hopeful. Housing is one of the critical areas that can act as an intervening force.

I notice that she was quieter the second time I visited: Her voice is soft on the recording, and even though I turn it up as loud as I can, she vanishes often in the noise of the traffic, disappearing among the trucks, the trams and the pulsing crossings. But she always asks, have you got a job, have you got a job? His website is michaelbgreen. It is being republished as part of our countdown to our 20th Birthday. Stay tuned for more great content from the last two decades.

As for Dee and Albert, I still think of them often. The first time I meet Albert, all I notice is his hair. I see him from behind, when his social worker points him out on a computer, playing poker on Facebook in the common room of his new supportive housing. He has the kind of hair you notice: But Albert puts me at ease in a moment. While we talk, a young man sitting two computers away starts coughing uncontrollably.

Unnerved, I glance towards him; Albert sees this, reassures me, and then gently checks on the kid. Albert has warm eyes and manners, but his nose is off-kilter and his chin angles the other way. The middle and index fingers on his left hand are stained where he holds his cigarettes. One year ago, he was sleeping rough. Tomorrow, however, is payday. She and her daughter are booked in to give blood. Since February, her rent has trumped her income. Dee introduces me to Brandy, her big handsome dog — a Japanese Akita, a breed known for loyalty.

In early autumn, the editors of The Big Issue asked me to write about housing and homelessness. In the next fortnight, I called charities and peak bodies, more and more of them, because each one recommended another.

I boiled down their words into three facts:. More than , Australians are homeless on any given night. Most of these people experience homelessness only briefly. About one in eight, however, reel from place to place, service to service; repelled and repelling, like magnets the wrong way round.

After I found out these things, I found Albert and Dee. In , at the height of global financial panic, just months after Wall Street collapsed, the federal government released a policy white paper called The Road Home. For this week at least, Albert orbits in a universe comprised of three core elements: When I arrived, Albert was out the front having a smoke with his friend, Alan, who has a small moustache and a furrowed brow.

Albert talks about his own, more tangible finances: So, in , Albert decided to try his luck in Adelaide. There were onsite counsellors and common areas — a library, a roof-deck garden, a computer lab, an art studio, a medical clinic, an exercise room and laundry facilities. The organisation Haggerty founded, Common Ground Community, now manages 12 buildings with nearly units.

Housing that comes with linked support services is more effective — and cheaper — than leaving people on the street and relying on police and emergency services to deal with them.

For many charity workers, however, Haggerty had a confronting message: She proposed dramatic change. Common Ground Adelaide was launched in , mirroring the New York model. In April, the organisation opened its second premises — a red-brick, heritage building overlooking a park in the Adelaide CBD, retrofitted with 52 apartments. The building is bright and airy, equipped with its own part-time medical and dental clinic and a worker who coordinates regular activities for the residents, things like gardening and ten-pin bowling.

But as I walked home that day, my footsteps wavered. As I listen, I picture her two-bedroom unit, neatly kept, but flimsy like a cardboard box. The tape continues and I recall the scene: It was through Kildonan that I met her.

After the launch, she chatted in the foyer while assorted charity workers milled around sandwich platters. In her lounge room, Dee tells me she thinks about her rent before she goes to sleep, and before she wakes up. Dee is crying, wiping tears away from her cheeks with the sleeve of her purple windcheater. I walked back to the train knowing this: Hutt Street serves breakfast to about people and lunches to about people every weekday.

Burns has reservations about the change. Even so, the approach has spread throughout the country, both in pre-existing scattered housing and in new dwellings.

But it is the South Australian government that has made the biggest changes, across all its housing services. The same goes for Albert. I think his room is tidy. Albert pulls his hair into a ponytail and starts doing the dishes, standing neatly with his legs together, half-turned towards me while we talk about his plans, long-term and short.

He wants to enrol in a bachelor degree in Aboriginal Studies in Music next year at the university. I visit Dee again. Before long, the questions taste sour in my mouth. Upset, Dee directs conversation through her dog, who is lying at her feet.

She has long been on waiting lists for public housing, and for a housing co-op in which she would pay below-market rent. The tenants have shifted from low-paid workers to the most marginalised in society — carers, single mothers, the elderly, disabled or chronically unemployed.

When population growth outstrips investment in housing, infrastructure and services, the economy still grows and most people become richer, but we are subsidised by the suffering of the poor. For months I pore over books and documents about homelessness. I thought about this paragraph the morning I read the rich list. As I walk, her voice comes and goes: I can come across quite good…make a joke and laugh. Michael Green published a follow-up article to 'Cracks in the Walls' on his blog in February Do crossword compilers have a secret handshake?

Which do you go by? It can be used to describe any crossword enthusiast, setter or solver, and I am definitely both.

Gradually the mysteries are unlocked and the secret codes and recipes reveal themselves. Plus, two minds are better than one. Is cruciverbalism a calling? So I gave it a go and discovered I had a knack for it. Do you have a weekly routine of crosswords and puzzles you like to solve? Do you have peculiar rites, customs, secret handshake etc?

It implies some kind of mixing or change is taking place. Unches are the squares in a crossword that only belong to one word. That is, the non-intersecting squares. The simplest advice I can give is to try not to be drawn into the surface meaning of the clue. In most cases this is totally irrelevant. There are a few fancy words for the people who put together crosswords: When did you first discover your love of crossword puzzles? My mum introduced me to cryptics when I was a teenager.

Then I discovered his blog , where he sets fun weekly challenges in devising clues. Do you spend a lot of time solving the puzzles of other compilers? I really like the cryptic puzzles from the UK — they did invent crosswords after all. I try to do the Times cryptic most days, and the Guardian crosswords are free online and have a good range of compilers and difficulty levels. Do you have any particular compiler heroes? Is there a community of crossword setters in Australia? An anagrind is the word in a cryptic clue that indicates the solver should make the word s beside it into an anagram.

As a solver, have you ever committed regrettable acts in a fit of crossword-induced frustration? Can you give Big Issue readers some tips on solving cryptics? Each clue generally has two parts — definition and wordplay.

I have argued yes many times. But the truth is, I was happy to see you go. How could I study enough when I had to work as well? I was lonely, and missing my family. I mean, how could I be expected to form a close relationship with my own daughter, when the one with my mother was in tatters? When you first saw my raw, red, scrawny body you told me your voice caught. You had everything prepared for me at home. Lace trim on the cradle. A slew of pink teddy bears.

You so longed for your little princess. But you got me instead. And it only got worse as I got older. The harder you tried to establish a relationship, the more I pushed you away.

That is, of course, until my own daughter came along. I am so grateful for all those times you changed Amity, fed Amity and took Amity out for walks. For giving me those moments to breathe when it felt like I was suffocating under it all. The fact that Amity has grown into a happy, healthy three-year-old is something for which I have you, in no small part, to thank.

They heighten your experience of living, but destroy you in the process. But looking back, I realise now that there were times I destroyed parts of you. I just went in to tuck an extra blanket around her and I found her lying with her arm around that pink bunny you gave her for Christmas. In this edition, two writers share stories about the relationships between mothers and daughters. I can still see you standing under the streetlight at the end of Carols by Candlelight, wiping your eyes, while the crowds streamed around you as they walked away from the beach.

I was scared, and I needed your help. Rather than asking you nicely, though, I demanded it. And when you hesitated, just for a second, I panicked. But when I try to justify this history to myself, I find it much easier to blame it all on you and Dad moving away when I was Did I want you to remain in Victoria rather than move to Queensland?

But when I began to find things hard on my own, I started to blame my inability to cope on you. The biggest thing I blamed you for, though, was the fear I felt when I was pregnant and I discovered my baby was going to be a girl. What really killed me, in those lonely moments when I was buying baby clothes by myself, is that you really wanted a daughter.

I had no idea that becoming a mother is so hard. And it was during some of my darkest days that you came to help me. The other day, Amity and I were scrolling through photos on my phone, when we came across one of you. Amity is asleep at the moment. See more at redbubble. The post showed a world map and ranked passports by the number of countries its owners can visit without a visa, or with a visa on arrival. The three least-powerful passports are those from Somalia, Iraq and Afghanistan.

All visitors must apply for a visa before travelling here. However, applicants from countries with high numbers of asylum seekers are much less likely to receive visas. It all comes back to risk; the risk that they might apply for asylum upon arrival.

In October , Malaysia introduced stricter visas for people from high asylum source states after a request from the Australian Government. This was in line with the broader trend of attempting to stop asylum seekers at their source. But a demographic shift takes place between the types of asylum seekers who travel on boats and those who travel on planes. The report counts non-illegal maritime arrival applications for asylum lodged by Chinese citizens, compared to from Afghani citizens.

This is important because, according to the UNHCR, the total number of refugees originating from Afghanistan is nearly 2. It is clear, however, that people attempt to travel to Australia by boat because air travel is not accessible to them. It is because they fall at the bottom of the list of passport power or, for those who are stateless, because any legal travel is impossible. Yet, again and again, the public is told that the benefit of saving lives at sea outweighs these crimes.

The universe of legitimate travel has been closed off to certain groups of people: They will do almost anything to find sanctuary in a new country.

But, as journalist Angelica Neville discovers during her investigation in Indonesia, destination countries like Australia will go to even greater lengths to keep them out. Now he is waiting to be resettled. He invited me into his home to meet some of his friends. We sit cross-legged on the carpeted floor, drinking tea, in the hot upstairs room. There are two fans, no windows and a plastic container full of plain white lollies. I speak to Moheeba, an old Afghani man who tells me that, when he was young, nobody went to school because parents were worried their children would be eaten by wolves on the way.

Moheeba had been a rock-breaker, and it looks as if the dust has settled permanently in the creases of his skin. One day, while working, he was kidnapped by the Taliban. Once free, he fled across the porous border to Pakistan. In Karachi, Moheeba organised for a smuggler to fly him to Jakarta.

That was four years ago. He has also been recognised as a refugee by the UNHCR, but now he is waiting for an embassy to accept his application so he can resettle. The hardest thing about waiting in Jakarta is the hunger and the uncertainty. This applies to any asylum seekers who arrived in Indonesia after 1 July The Australian Government also announced it would reduce the intake of refugees who arrived in Indonesia before July The smugglers who arranged for him to enter Indonesia took their fake documents back.

Visas play an often-ignored role in preventing people wishing to seek asylum from travelling legitimately. He explains how countries use visa restrictions as a deterrent: This is one reason refugees use irregular means of travel, such as boats.

The trend of introducing visas to target and prevent the movement of specific nationalities emerged in the s during a spike in asylum-seeker numbers. This was along with other preventative measures such as governments fining airlines if they transport anyone without proper documentation. Between and , onshore claims for asylum were made in Australia. This rose to 27, between and Part of this increase was the result of a one-off offer to consider Chinese students living in Australia for refugee status after the Tiananmen Square massacre.

He also notes a demographic change that occurred at this time: Cheaper air travel meant that not only did numbers of asylum seekers increase, but people seeking asylum started coming from increasingly farther afield. Border controls became a big deal. They tightened and expanded in reach.

Australia and other major destination states go to considerable effort to prevent potential asylum seekers arriving by attempting to stop them at their source. Part of this is making it more difficult for potential asylum seekers to travel by plane. Australia has a universal visa requirement. Additionally, the Australian Government lobbies other countries in the region to introduce stricter visa requirements as a way of preventing people reaching Australia. Of course, people still fly to Australia by plane and apply for asylum, usually on tourist or student visas.

Other factors play a role, of course, including perceived security risks and diplomatic priorities. Again and again human rights abuses have been exposed in Australian-run detention centres. Oxfam estimates there are around billionaires in the world. But rather than preaching revolution or class warfare, Oxfam has cast these billionaires as those with the answer to some pressing problems.

Not their total wealth; just the income from And who ever heard of billionaires sharing their wealth around? This is not about faith or religion, Gates has said: That reality sets an obvious course for me and my family: Since then her personal wealth has soared. So, too, has the number of headlines about her, few of which would have pleased her.

If she did decide to give it all away, well, the ripples would spread wide. Even wider than those Pilbara landscapes she loves. Lifestyles of the rich and famous have more immediate appeal than, say, everyday doings of ordinary people. When things go wrong in the lives of the rich — as happened last year with a Rinehart family dispute, played out in public to the dismay of those involved — it becomes a kind of spectator sport.

There is a measure of reassurance there, too: What has not increased, however, is any perception of her greater involvement in philanthropy — though perhaps she is just keeping it quiet. Despite the cover of this edition, there is more to this time of the year than chocolate. My mind is on higher things. For this is the time of year when it is impossible to avoid religious questions. Even sporting codes accept that bumps and biffo must temporarily take a back seat. Well, some of them, that is.

Easter Sunday and Monday, yes; Good Friday, no. Make of that what you will. But even those who may check in on some of those events tend to be conscious that the long Easter weekend has a religious basis.

Appropriately, the global Catholic Church has organised things so that believers approach Easter with a new spiritual leader, Pope Francis.

All the major elements required of an imposing spectacle were ticked off: Still, he is said to be a sprightly 76, and few would dispute that he made a promising start. In his first public appearances he demonstrated humility, a sense of humour and an apparent determination not to lose the common touch. Sharing transport with cardinals, checking out of accommodation himself, standing in line for breakfast… These are all little things in themselves, but they have sent shockwaves through the Vatican.

There is already a sense that Pope Francis is more interested in people than pomp. It may not last, of course. This Pope, like his predecessors, confronts a daunting array of problems facing the Catholic Church, ranging from sexual abuse to alarming declines in both numbers of priests and adherents.

And there is, of course, much preaching at this time of the year, everywhere from Rome to, say, Renmark or Rooty Hill. It is not a bad thing, every once in a while, to pause to consider some of the big questions in life and death and everything in between. Now is a good time to do it. Some may go to church to do so, although that is not a prerequisite for reflection.

The hardest part is allowing yourself to do it, in your own way and time. Too much to mention, really, including features by Vin Maskell, Isabella Fels and Andy Drewitt, whose names will be familiar to regular readers. Fully support the concept. But our annual Christmas edition is, well, a bit of a monster. We need eight extra pages to accommodate seasonal messages from vendors around the country, summing up the year past and thanking their customers.

This year we also have a bonus — a short story written exclusively by Irvine Trainspotting Welsh for street papers all around the world. Since the very first Christmas edition, way back in , when The Big Issue was still essentially a Melbourne-only publication, it has become traditional for one or more vendors to be featured on the cover.

Sometimes I suspect that some male vendors cultivate whiskers to improve their odds of being cast as Santa. This year, the honour goes to John hmmm, who is bearded and Susie from Perth. John and Susie are the cover-stars, but the heart of this edition is the vendor messages: It adds up to a lot of messages.

And every year I am struck by some of the sentiments expressed by the men and women who sell our magazine around the country. They have all experienced hardship and disadvantage, yet the messages are overwhelmingly positive. These are just some that struck me as we put together this edition: Just smile and be happy, everyone!

Much can be taken away from these messages — above all else, a bit of perspective. Difficulties often dwindle when compared to the situations of other people, especially when you are exposed to the upbeat attitudes they express. What else is there? And to new readers — all those buying The Big Issue for the first time — welcome!

Perhaps as the year one pope Benedict retired, which surprised everyone, and another Francis was elected. Pope Francis then shocked everyone by championing charity, compassion and humility.

It is too early to judge his administration, other than to suggest it is far easier to oppose than govern. Not just his death, which in itself was not unexpected, but the assessments it sparked and the coming-together of disparate people for his memorial service.

Two things linger in my memory from that time: He had a powerful sense of self but also, more importantly, a sense of his country as a whole. I have heard loose talk about a new year being imminent; also the suggestion that I must write some words preferably with a New Year theme to fill this space. The last New Year was surely only a month or so ago. We think of years in terms of events: The latter is private; the former out there on the public record. How will be remembered?

The irony here is that, apart from the positive impression made by its new leader, the Catholic Church had a dreadful year. This was especially so in Australia, where the issue of sexual abuse by clergy, and the failure of authorities to deal with it appropriately, received unprecedented coverage — almost as much as federal politics, for which was an especially febrile year.

It was the year of three prime ministers: But it does seem safe to say that the widespread disillusionment with politics and politicians caused by the acrimony and pettiness in Canberra in recent years will take a great deal of hard work to obviate. The Prime Minister — any prime minister — should aim high and think big.

In this regard, Nelson Mandela makes a fine role model. My hunch already is that the death of Mandela — aged 95, in December — will, in time, be regarded as the most significant event of He is watching me as I write this.

His legacy will last into next year…and far beyond. Washing with soap and water can prevent the spread of infections that kill millions of people, including children, in developing countries.

There, in that township without flushing water and a shared tap, soap and clean water are luxuries. More importantly, mental health and poverty and disadvantage are relevant to us for 52 weeks of the year; not one.

I am not the one to ask for detailed information about her career and back- catalogue. Which is why Clem Bastow, a former Music Editor here, has written our cover story; not me. She works hard, which is commendable: What else is there to say about Katy? Proof of that lies in the millions of records sold and extra shows scheduled around Australia since her tour was first announced.

In a township, I visited a proud, dignified woman in a crude house that was impeccably neat. There was no flooring, but the bare earth had recently been swept. A local told me I had to understand that this was an election in which flushing toilets were an issue. Any candidate promising to deliver flushing toilets would win votes. I could believe that, as this was a place where the only source of fresh water was a single tap shared by many, many people.

Has anything changed since then? We need to be careful with all those asterisks in the calendar. And outside that one week in October, is anyone ever actually for poverty? In this publication, we seldom go overboard about dates — not least because weeks are an awkward fit with a magazine on sale for a fortnight.

The American entertainer, whose songs are as catchy as her costumes are colourful, will soon be performingaround Australia, starting in Perth on 7 November. What could I tell you about Ms Perry?

Well, she has a lot of fans. If even a modest proportion of fans buy this edition because she is featured on the cover, the year-old from California will have done all our vendors a favour. Then they will be the ones roaring. This article appears in Ed Even though Weldon completed the artwork quite recently, several things changed before the magazine went to press.

Then, in November, Clarke faced his greatest test when his friend and former teammate, Phillip Hughes, died after being struck by a ball while playing cricket. Another idea discussed when we were trying to settle on a New Year theme was a tie-in with one of the holiday movies, as we did with The Hobbit two years ago.

Night at the Museum 3 , with a big-name cast, was considered as something that could have broad appeal. Williams made a Big Issue cover in Ed , because his unexpected death in August focused attention on the impact of suicide.

Closer to home, former Prime Minister Gough Whitlam was remembered by men and women of Australia after dying at the venerable age of 98; writer, comedian and disability advocate Stella Young departed too soon at An old year prompts reflection; a new year invites resolutions. This year begins, like the last one, and the one before that, with too big a gap between rich and poor.

Inequality is a topic we have addressed many times, most recently in Ed We will continue to do so as long as that gap gets bigger. I take heart from a sense that most people do believe in a fair go.

That is, indeed, a big issue. I was shocked to realise the report dates back to — when, by coincidence, I started filling this space every fortnight.

That could explain a lot. On my carefully preserved report about the death of Max, aged 18, I have circled a Clooney quote. The guy had clearly kicked on. So much so that I then started noticing news stories: His time has come. Further proof of that is a discernible Ed backlash. Not in those big spaces. Fans want more than that. He also seems relaxed about them.

As he says in our interview: His success has been achieved against the odds: Many of those who bag him, meanwhile, can continue to toss stones from the haven of comfortable obscurity. A few years ago I was leaned on very politely to put an English musician named Ed Sheeran on the cover. So… Ed clearly has a sense of humour.

He should also have a sense that things are going his way. Sheeran is well aware of his critics. My view on it is God looked down one day and was like… You need some help, mate. The hairy hedonist who found fame as a frenetic, substance-fuelled comedian is now calmer, settled.

Even his signature hair-nest is more contained, dignified with specks of grey. When Brand last starred in The Big Issue he was going about fulfilling his boyhood goal to get super-famous and then change the world, using his wit to rabble-rouse against inequality.

Now the actor-cum-author-cum-activist is using his distinctive voice to talk about addiction. Freedom From Our Addictions, laying out his own road to recovery. Brand sat down with four UK vendors to talk addiction, homelessness and self-acceptance in an illuminating interview that is more like an open conversation between friends. Brand has long rallied against the way we view addiction.

I enjoy our chats. There are no stories on it inside. Plenty of time for someone else to start those engines. Thanks again for the idea. Each little pair of arms wrapped tightly around a woolly soft toy, as the boys were themselves held steady by a much stronger pair of arms. The woman had been a mother, a friend, a wife, a lover. And an ardent rationalist. Rather, she favoured the musings of the American stargazer and popular science guru, Carl Sagan. A Personal Voyage , the hugely popular US series Sagan hosted in which is still doing the rounds in YouTube clips today , Sagan ponders life, the universe and everything.

And the book, Cosmos , that accompanied the successful series gave us the Sagan quote that launched a thousand memes: We are made of starstuff. This notion — that we are a literal part of the fabric of all nature, that we are starstuff — had resonated strongly with the woman whose life had flickered out, but whose energy could not have. A Vision of the Human Future in Space.

Draw the Pokies Youtube Cartoons Bugs book loaded with straight

Showing results for "" Exclusive bonuses of $ AUD FREE to play real money Australian slots coinsluckyz.com pokies Australia for real money/10(). Visit top-rated online casino Australia for real money pokies online casino section, besides pokies, AUS players can choose filter your results in each. Australian Pokies Facts & Figures. This section covers some facts about the pokies in Australia and about video slots in general. We also discuss the reason and show.

Frequently asked questions

When You Wish Know?

Get a free employer account to respond to reviews, see who is viewing your profile, and engage with your candidates. We also discuss the reason and show you why there is really no way to be a long term winner if you play slot machines over an extended period of time. JackpotCity is definitely the best casino to enjoy online pokies at in Australia! In addition, there is the atmosphere of the casino. Blackjack, on the other hand, is a game of strategy: These are just a few of the many reasons to play casino games online at Wild Jack Casino:. In a park in the nature image.

When are the portions that they compute?

Wild Jack adds new online casino games every month. Check our Bonuses designed for AU Players Be sure to check promotions designed exclusively with Australian players in mind! There is no way to win on the pokies in the long term. Keep the Culture strong and keep the mission alive. You can play the no-download games off your Web browser in our flash casino.

Novomatic Pokies Prime Numbers

Treatment for Pelvic Pain - Results Physiotherapy