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Being such a small village means the eating options are relatively limited. Not a village in a quaint kind of way; more like a glorified strip mall, really. Tin Plate is a relative newcomer to the town, feeding-up visitors with pizza, pasta and piada — a type of pita roll loaded with things like spiced pulled pork, meatballs or chorizo and prawn. It was carne pizza 22 for this one — topped with venison, beef, lamb and mushrooms. A similar reaction with the penne Meagre in size and a little too al dente.

At least the flavours were good — with bacon, garlic, chilli and basil. Cakes, slices, wraps and sandwiches fill the cabinets, with platters of fresh scones filling the air with their buttery scent.

High country fried eggs House-made muesli with three slices of poached pear and yoghurt. Rather steep in price, but tasty none the less. You can even base yourself in the village at one of a handful of accommodations. We were at a safe distance, so watching ice and rock tumble down a mountain was seriously spectacular. As far as a town goes, this one is a bit of a youngster.

The town centre is merely a cluster of strip mall-type buildings that contain services and most of the eateries. Yes, they even have a grappa menu. I guess it was only midday and I was driving, so no booze just yet. The lunch menu is a mixed bag of top-notch cafe fare. I went all out and ordered the confit duck leg An enormous shallow dish that also contained a spiced wild game cassoulet of pancetta, venison sausage, veg and white beans.

A much lighter lamb shoulder 20 resembled an open sandwich, of sorts. More than a dozen pens cluster in the water around the shop, with access to a couple of them if you feel like tossing the salmon pellets and creating a wild feeding frenzy. Inside the shop you can purchase hot and cold salmon, whole fish or fillets, sashimi lunch packs; even free range eggs, local honey and chutneys. Well worth the stop-in if you want to stretch the legs, get some fresh air and some of that fresh salmon grown just metres away.

En route to our next overnighter is a blink-and-miss-it locale called Tarras. The Tarras Country Cafe offers country style breakfasts and a few lunch options like polenta cakes, bagels, salads and sandwiches. Caffeine and sugar was all I needed to stay alert, so macchiato and ginger crunch it was. The town of Wanaka fits the same kind of template as Tekapo. Gorgeous lake back-dropped by the Southern Alps, walking, hiking and skiing.

Wanaka is a larger town, has a lot more buzz and a more diverse food scene. Happy hour, of course. It was time to get stuck into some local vino, chat and watch the sun go down over Lake Wanaka. Next door to the bar is BoaBoa Food Company.

Nothing more than a takeaway with a few seats for those that are lucky enough to get them. If burgers are your thing, then this is a good place to start. There are twelve to choose from. Thin crumb and steaming, flakey fish innards. Sadly the meat was overcooked and incredibly dry and the chilli jam and beet relish was nowhere to be seen.

The kitchen seemed to be on the verge of melt-down due to a massive influx of people placing orders on this particular visitation, and the few guys in there were barely coping with it all. Interrupting them may have become contentious. As the sunrise hit the surrounding snowcapped peaks, we emerged from our humble Alpine Motel in search of food and coffee. It seemed I was the only one with an appetite that morning, tucking into my baked mushrooms Rich, earthy and loaded with parmesan, peas, tiny croutons and oozing egg.

Bacon on the side, of course. That rocky knoll that rises metres above the town is Mount Iron. Most people would drive past and not think more about it, others have the desire to climb it after breakfast. Nothing like a bit of a sweat in the morning, right? And I guess the view is pretty special — down the Cardrona and Upper Clutha Valleys, over both lakes and a virtual wall of mountains.

Sadly, for us, the fuel indicator decided to flash red halfway up, forcing us to turn around as the nearest petrol station was way back in Wanaka. Note to self — check fuel levels before driving up mountains. Dinner choices in Wanaka are aplenty, but it pays to book ahead or get in early, as many of the good restaurants fill up very quickly.

Unfortunate for us was they were solidly booked, but if we were ok with it, one of the outside tables was available for the next hour. All of that aside, it was well worth the slight discomfort. For a start, the handmade beetroot agnolotti And then the Aoraki salmon salad There was no holding back on the hot-smoked salmon as it took up most of the dish alongside shaved fennel, segments of orange and a good dose of salsa verde and chilli.

And if we did, we would have missed out on the next two plates entirely. House-made potato gnocchi 25 with braised beef shin. I mean really, how could you not? The orecchiette 22 was no slouch, either.

Caramelised apple tart 12 with mascarpone ice cream and a divine set lemon cream 12 that came with high praise from our wonderful waitress. Both are great, but that lemon cream, well, it made our tastebuds bounce. Aside from the cute glass cloche presentation, the arrangement of fresh and freeze-dried mandarin, pistachios, meringue and lemon gel was enchanting. And the flavour — uplifting and incredibly light. Prior to setting off on the next leg of our road trip, it was breakfast at Federal Diner in the centre of town.

This is another popular breakfast-brunch hang-out with a robust selection of edibles. Baked delights tempt you as you walk in past the kitchen counter — pastries, scones and bikkies and the smell of coffee hangs in the air, tempting me order one as soon as we take a seat.

Once again it was me with the morning appetite, going vegetarian with the Hawea flat Crisp fried hunks of polenta with spinach, grilled haloumi, mushrooms and tomato. A decent start to the day before more driving into the South Island wilderness. And those that are up for staying the night can even book a room to sample the bustling Cardrona Village nightlife.

Chowder, burgers, crumbed venison and seafood platters sit alongside fried camembert, nachos and hoisin lamb ribs. Something for just about everyone — even the kiddies. Ok, perhaps not enough peas.

Winterslaw and tartare come with it. I already had a few tomatoes on my windowsill, picked from my garden the day before a crow decided to peck away at most of my other tomatoes. Nice save on my behalf. And they kinda taste nice. I guess my love for native Australian herbs and spices extends across the Tasman, as well. This native herb from New Zealand is now an active member of my spice drawer! Barely two hours on the road and we were pulling into the driveway of our first overnighter.

And check the digs we were shacked-up in. All that was missing was a pair of flamingo statues. Although, the garden did have its share of colourful statuesque critters! Being in town at the end of winter presented us with having most of the place to ourselves. Aside from two local ladies and a small family of three, it was just us at The Fat Duck tucking into a hearty lunch. Pub and cafe-style food abounds at this chilled eatery in the centre of town, and it was the winter special menu that got our attention.

Inside and to the right is a casual bar area, to the left is the humbly-decorated restaurant complete with booths and tables that extend into a separate room.

Aside from the awkwardly deep bowl that made eating the Fiordland venison pie 26 a challenge, the chunks of meat were slow-cooked to toothsome tenderness. A bucket of kumara fries came with it, as did a superfluous and flavour-challenged salad of shredded iceberg, cucumber and carrot. Soy braised pork belly 29 was a must, served atop bok choy and several discs of aromatic West Coast black pudding. It was the native horopito that prompted me to order the chicken wings BBQ sauce sweetens the tender wings and another dose of shredded iceberg salad provides the greenery.

Very close to Bailiez is Kepler Restaurant, an eatery with more of a modern hand at the local food it dishes up. Every flavour complemented the other and the added confit cubes of beet and red currant jus brought delicious pops of sweetness. Dabs of sweet mint sauce sealed the deal.

Consistently good coffee, hearty food, friendly service and some killer homemade sweet and savoury muffins. Aside from those delicious muffins — yes we had our share — and the cabinet stocked with cakes, tarts, slices and rolls, the brekkie menu is a celebration of egg dishes, toasties and grains. The hash brown stack Being in Fiordland and not getting out-and-about would be a bit of a waste of time, so our agenda involved driving from Te Anau to Milford Sound.

An early morning rise as a thick fog blanketed the valley pretty much as far as The Divide. Once high enough in altitude, of course, it was clear skies and valleys in the Mount Christina and Mount Lyttle region. Stunning view, as you can see above. Before the drive through the mountain via Homer Tunnel it was a stop to take in the scenery, stretch the legs and be reminded of the biting cold outside. Exiting Homer Tunnel provided yet another spectacular view.

This time over a deep forested valley filled with fog pretty-much all the way to Milford Sound. No town, as such, can be found there. Free limited wifi comes in handy when the urge to reconnect is required, even if the connection is painfully weak. Snaps to the coffee-maker, as well. So good that we went back for another top-up after our little cruise on the sound. Seals bask in the sunshine at the base of sheer cliffs, snow is dusted high above the waterline and waterfalls plunge into the milky turquoise waters.

And there you have it. Magestic Mitre Peak enshrouded with clouds; the iconic Milford Sound scene that people come far and wide for. With Milford Sound and Te Anau well and truly behind us, the South Island road trip continued in a south-easterly direction with a quick early morning stop at the small township of Lumsden.

It was the mural on the local pub that made me pull the car over to snap a few pics. Breezing through town only had one requirement. Tempting cakes peered from the bench cabinet, but for us it was a couple of coffees whilst seated in old movie theatre seats. Our arrival time coincided perfectly with lunch time and I had eyes for just one place. One thing I did love seeing was greens that had been foraged by either Ken himself or one of his suppliers. Local Gruff junction goat curd 17 took centre stage in the first arrival, tinted with beetroot and piped into brik pastry.

A final chefs flourish of bee pollen completed the picture. A couple of leaves and blanched cavalo nero added greenery. Not to mention the foraged greens, blooms, hazelnuts, apple and native horopito pepper relish. Rhubarb and custard 16 is tricked up with yoghurt, granola and maple syrup ice cream with a preserved raspberry crisp.

Fiona from Bracken strongly suggested we take a drive into the Otago Peninsula after she learned we were in town for just one night, and the fact the weather was absolute perfection. Nature lovers flock to this part of the South Island to see seals, sea lions, penguins and a plethora of birdlife. We so happened to drop by the Royal Albatross Centre where we were lucky enough to witness many of these majestic birds and see them in flight.

This is the worlds only mainland breeding colony for albatross, with all profits going straight back into the maintenance and protection of the area. We gravitated north away from The Octagon to sniff out the more casual eateries past the shopping strip, settling on a bit of Indian for the night. Shahi Tandoor is a sizeable place with a rather vibrant appearance. Orange walls and ceiling and illuminated pillars depicting bright photos of spices.

The amritsari machhi My usual Indian go-to is biryani, so no exceptions were made in choosing the lamb 14 variety. The rice was quite overcooked, which made everything a little on the sloppy-side. As for the flavour, it was bang on. Tandoori murgh 10 is also flavour-packed. Juicy little pieces of chicken fresh from the oven. Not a great deal seemed to be open for early risers like ourselves. Good for us that Morning Magpie was ready for business, pulling coffees for a stream of regulars that clearly work in the neighbourhood.

No work for us, however, as all we had planned for the day was a bit of driving to our next destination. The main focus at Morning Magpie is the coffee they churn out. Many of the edibles are made in-house, often displayed on the counter for all to see. Cakes, slices, rolls and ready to-go bagel sandwiches. One of the big and rustic savoury scrolls did us fine, as did a creamy mushroom open bagel It comes loaded with spinach and cottage cheese as well.

This little roaster and cafe offers nothing more than a handful of baked items, but we do understand you can bring your own food. You may want to check on that before you pack a lunch and nab one of the tables in this stark and sleek space. The coffee is meticulously made and packs a real punch. Something I needed as it was my turn to drive us to the next destination. Adventure capital of New Zealand. The ski fields, for a start. The last time we were in Queenstown was somewhere around 18 years ago.

Well, perhaps a little. One thing for sure is the landscape upon which Queenstown is built is nothing short of stunning. This is undoubtedly the most popular eatery in town. Take a look at this sexy beast. That would be Chief Wiggum Following the vegetable factor are thick strips of meltingly fatty slow-roasted pork belly with a sweet apricot seeded mustard. To be blunt, it was nothing short of stupendous and completely overshadowed my rather ordinary burger choice.

It all sounded great on paper and looked decent enough, but my sweet bambi The first time we dropped in for coffee we had to sit out in the lane due to every inside seat being occupied.

At least the sun was warm, and that fab coffee warmed the innards in no time. Back down on the waterfront at Steamer Wharf there are a number of eating and drinking options. And what better way to sit and watch the sun set over the snow-dusted Remarkables than al fresco beneath a heater?

Some toasted brioche helped soak up some of that broth and, disappointingly, the chef decided to replace the promised rhubarb chutney with a smoked whipped yoghurt. Sounds interesting enough, but the incredibly intense smokiness was like a jolt to the palate; a questionable condiment to an otherwise bland casserole. I could have eaten them all night. Perhaps people stuck to their hotel breakfast buffet?

Of the couple of options available, Vudu Larder seemed the magnet for the early breakfast punters. The meals are hearty and delicious and the array of house baked sweets and savouries in the long cabinet is rather impressive. How about grilled haloumi 18 with perfectly cooked poached eggs? A coriander-spiked tomato salsa joined in on the yolky fun; as did some toasted tortilla that was smeared with spiced black beans. A blueberry compote crowns the stack with a dollop of orange-vanilla bean ricotta.

Sitting inside to listen to the well-informed commentary was the warmer option, but sitting up on the roof in the freezing cold provided unobstructed views of the remarkable scenery.

The menu is New Zealand through-and-through, with the likes of local venison, lamb, beef and rabbit alongside Pacific Island style cod and sweet pav for dessert.

Ours was a relatively light lunch that involved — for starters — some intriguing chickpea chips with truffle salt Too many things were screaming to me from the extensive menu. Confit duck pancakes, coconut fried chicken and potted rabbit, to name a few. And then there was the braised beef cheek 22 ; tenderly sliced and served with roasted cauliflower and juicy raisins.

Some collagen-rich goodness that hit all the right places. A salad of salt baked beets 18 took care of the vegetable element, with the addition of peppery watercress, almonds and sheep feta. Take sitting on the waterfront and having a few drinks, or shopping for a new pair of sunglasses because yours mysteriously disappeared. The options are aplenty. Frisbee enthusiasts can even partake in a rather unique activity called Disc Golf. That would be a fellow named Chris Scott.

Hot and fresh from the oven, the bread is very fluffy, a little sweet and sprinkled with rosemary and sea salt. Cheese and honey always work, in my eyes, so thumbs-up here. I liked the play of textures with the Moko smoked eel 22 ; small firm pieces of eel, golden, yellow and red beets, crunchy black quinoa and watercress.

There was meant to be horseradish in there somewhere, but it barely showed its face. I must be honest, I prefer the town without the hoards, and seeing it enshrouded in smoke from burning fireplaces added a mystique to the whole setting. These guys know how to get my attention. The name says it all with the goods that are on offer — gourmet pantry and fridge edibles, fresh bread and baked goods made daily, local ceramics and baking accessories.

I may be generalising a tad, but they seem to know their stuff. Following a few days in Mount Maunganui , we landed in Wellington and grabbed a hire car from the airport. I knew of a good place, and thanks to it being in close proximity to the airport, it was time for the eating and coffee-drinking to commence. The Larder is a homely neighbourhood restaurant that not only makes a fine coffee, but the breakfast hits all the right places.

Brekkie for me was the croque madame 17 , crowned with an egg spilling its glorious innards onto the plate. Down by the waterfront is one of many Mojo coffee outlets that can be found peppered across town, and the country. The beans are roasted locally; opposite this outlet, actually. The menu covers breakfast and all your usual lunch suspects.

Breakfast was why we were there. This match box-of-a-place was something we happened to have walked past, looked at one another, then did a u-turn and stuck our noses in. Punch Coffee Bar is nothing more than a bunker-like hole in the wall. A small counter, an espresso machine and two tables out the front. These guys mean serious business when it comes to the bean. Havana Coffee Works skipped traditional roasting methods and went for a fluid bed hot air roaster, a device that cooks the beans more evenly.

Plungers, grinders, machines, merchandise and, of course, the beans they roast onsite. I kinda liked the look and sound of this place. Cute name with cute surroundings. The attraction here was, firstly, the hole-in-the-wall location and, secondly, a pair of young hipsters manning the bunker. These guys looked like they had it going in the coffee department.

Two chairs on the footpath, a retro formica side table, and two middle-aged non-hipsters getting in on the coffee action. That would be me and the other half. Find it opposite the bus stop. A little out of the centre, out near the airport, is this small neighbourhood cafe in Strathmore. I need the recipe for those scones! Back in town, I thought this place would be a good spot to take a load off for a few minutes. No food for us, though.

It was all about the macchiato and piccolo latte. The macchiato was actually perfection. Short pour, tiny bit of milk and a seriously gutsy bean. Another breakfast brought us to the iconic Floriditas. The creamy eggs were the absolute star. Weaker than a cafe latte. Not great at all. Back to Mojo, it was down on the corner of Wakefield and Taranaki that we had our last coffees before hitting the airport to head home.

Aside from The Rock being a designer geometric structure, Mojo takes pride of place within it. Not that I needed anymore caffeine, as I was already flying on about three cups of coffee. This one was made better than the one down on Wakefield. But for now, it was time to head home. And that, we did. For a night, anyway. Definitely worth the coffee pit stop. Overall a rather decent dinner spread. Haast The first sign of civilisation in these wild and rugged parts is at Haast, a tiny township a few kilometres from the coast.

It was time for lunch 2. We passed on the posset. This place sure is an acquired taste, possum pie, or not. Hanmer Springs Known for its thermal pools and alpine scenery, the resort town of Hanmer Springs was our next overnight stop.

Pulse 5 or 6 times, then process until the mixture comes together. Pour the mixture straight into the lined baking tin and press evenly into the bottom. Stir occasionally as it melts and simmers and all the icing sugar has dissolved.

The base should also still be a little warm. Set aside for 5 minutes and then sprinkle over the chopped pistachios. This makes cutting easier as it can be quite hard once completely chilled. Also, cutting it chilled runs the risk of it shattering into small pieces.

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If it's Saturday morning and you are eating this, then you are somewhere in Texas. Probably have a Big Red next to it, too. We have some of the largest rodeos in the country down here in Texas. And we love to brag about it. You can take your gelato and stuff it right up Ben and Jerry's nose, in Texas it's Blue Bell or nothing.

This place is a Central Texas icon. Even if you are not from Texas, once you step in here for some dancing, you are as Texan as they come. There are many amusement parks in Texas, but when it comes to water parks then you know most Texans are thinking Schlitterbahn. We love us some George Bush. A George Bush has won the state of Texas every time one has run for President. Light sweet crude is so beloved, and abundant, down here that we have been known to use it as a sauce for food.

Maybe we love the state fair so much because it is the largest one on the U. Most likely though it is because you can find fried versions of nearly every known food. An upcoming festival on the PuroSanAntonio level involves two things people here love most: The event is going on its fourth year of perfection, and festivals are twice a year, in the spring and fall. The channel owner runs a food vlog where she films weird and wonderful food creations from around the world including cotton candy art in Toyko and black crepes in Bangkok.

Travel Thirsty via Storyful ","pubdate": Buzz60's Maria Mercedes Galuppo mariamgaluppo has more. Don't skip out on the horseradish: It's pungency is what breathes new life into leftover veggies. Because the pork is so lean, the meatballs cook in just 8 minutes. Match made in San Antonio Heaven: Image 1 of Image 2 of Image 3 of Image 4 of Image 5 of Image 6 of Image 7 of Image 8 of Short shorts and cowboy boots: Image 9 of Image 10 of Texans love to drink this stuff by the gallon, all year long.

Image 11 of Every state has it, but not every state "gets it. Image 12 of Image 13 of Image 14 of Find a river in Texas and you will eventually find some Texans in it with some tubes and beers. Image 15 of True, it is more of a South Texas thing, but that does not make it any less a cult hit. Image 16 of Image 17 of Image 18 of Image 19 of Image 20 of We only really need two musicians in Texas, and George is one of them.

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Such rock formations can be seen in many places across New Zealand, but the ones at Moeraki are probably the most visited and photographed. Ninety minutes north of Moeraki is the small port city of Timaru, our first food stop of the day. In retrospect, we probably should have wandered about the city centre a little more to check out the beautiful bluestone Edwardian and Victorian buildings, but once the appetite was sated, we kind of forgot. The lunch menu may not offer as much as the one at dinner, but the six or seven options are solid examples of English and Continental bistro-style fare.

The savouries were so good that desserts were a given. Warmed slice of orange syrup cake 12 , a scattering of pistachio crumble and healthy dollop of thick yoghurt. Just as warming was the toffee apple grunt Beneath the biscuit top is baked apple and boysenberries, bourbon-soaked prunes and pine nuts. The remnants of hazy memories from my first visit to Tekapo involve a multitude of colourful lupins, an old church and killer sandflies. Not much has changed other than us missing lupin season and those biting insects not being so prevalent.

As for the Church of the Good Shepherd, well, you can scroll down and see it yourself. Tekapo, as with most of the South Island, presents itself as a bit of a postcard. A rippling turquoise-coloured lake framed by the snow-dusted Southern Alps. Many come for the hot springs, air safaris, skiing and trekking, but another activity so happens to be star gazing. Overlooking the village is the Mount John Observatory, a place that takes full advantage of the clear night skies and low levels of local light pollution.

Food-wise, the offerings are all about sandwiches, bagels and a few cakes. Being such a small village means the eating options are relatively limited. Not a village in a quaint kind of way; more like a glorified strip mall, really. Tin Plate is a relative newcomer to the town, feeding-up visitors with pizza, pasta and piada — a type of pita roll loaded with things like spiced pulled pork, meatballs or chorizo and prawn.

It was carne pizza 22 for this one — topped with venison, beef, lamb and mushrooms. A similar reaction with the penne Meagre in size and a little too al dente. At least the flavours were good — with bacon, garlic, chilli and basil. Cakes, slices, wraps and sandwiches fill the cabinets, with platters of fresh scones filling the air with their buttery scent. High country fried eggs House-made muesli with three slices of poached pear and yoghurt.

Rather steep in price, but tasty none the less. You can even base yourself in the village at one of a handful of accommodations. We were at a safe distance, so watching ice and rock tumble down a mountain was seriously spectacular. As far as a town goes, this one is a bit of a youngster.

The town centre is merely a cluster of strip mall-type buildings that contain services and most of the eateries. Yes, they even have a grappa menu. I guess it was only midday and I was driving, so no booze just yet. The lunch menu is a mixed bag of top-notch cafe fare. I went all out and ordered the confit duck leg An enormous shallow dish that also contained a spiced wild game cassoulet of pancetta, venison sausage, veg and white beans.

A much lighter lamb shoulder 20 resembled an open sandwich, of sorts. More than a dozen pens cluster in the water around the shop, with access to a couple of them if you feel like tossing the salmon pellets and creating a wild feeding frenzy. Inside the shop you can purchase hot and cold salmon, whole fish or fillets, sashimi lunch packs; even free range eggs, local honey and chutneys.

Well worth the stop-in if you want to stretch the legs, get some fresh air and some of that fresh salmon grown just metres away. En route to our next overnighter is a blink-and-miss-it locale called Tarras. The Tarras Country Cafe offers country style breakfasts and a few lunch options like polenta cakes, bagels, salads and sandwiches. Caffeine and sugar was all I needed to stay alert, so macchiato and ginger crunch it was.

The town of Wanaka fits the same kind of template as Tekapo. Gorgeous lake back-dropped by the Southern Alps, walking, hiking and skiing. Wanaka is a larger town, has a lot more buzz and a more diverse food scene. Happy hour, of course. It was time to get stuck into some local vino, chat and watch the sun go down over Lake Wanaka. Next door to the bar is BoaBoa Food Company. Nothing more than a takeaway with a few seats for those that are lucky enough to get them.

If burgers are your thing, then this is a good place to start. There are twelve to choose from. Thin crumb and steaming, flakey fish innards. Sadly the meat was overcooked and incredibly dry and the chilli jam and beet relish was nowhere to be seen. The kitchen seemed to be on the verge of melt-down due to a massive influx of people placing orders on this particular visitation, and the few guys in there were barely coping with it all.

Interrupting them may have become contentious. As the sunrise hit the surrounding snowcapped peaks, we emerged from our humble Alpine Motel in search of food and coffee. It seemed I was the only one with an appetite that morning, tucking into my baked mushrooms Rich, earthy and loaded with parmesan, peas, tiny croutons and oozing egg. Bacon on the side, of course.

That rocky knoll that rises metres above the town is Mount Iron. Most people would drive past and not think more about it, others have the desire to climb it after breakfast. Nothing like a bit of a sweat in the morning, right? And I guess the view is pretty special — down the Cardrona and Upper Clutha Valleys, over both lakes and a virtual wall of mountains. Sadly, for us, the fuel indicator decided to flash red halfway up, forcing us to turn around as the nearest petrol station was way back in Wanaka.

Note to self — check fuel levels before driving up mountains. Dinner choices in Wanaka are aplenty, but it pays to book ahead or get in early, as many of the good restaurants fill up very quickly. Unfortunate for us was they were solidly booked, but if we were ok with it, one of the outside tables was available for the next hour. All of that aside, it was well worth the slight discomfort.

For a start, the handmade beetroot agnolotti And then the Aoraki salmon salad There was no holding back on the hot-smoked salmon as it took up most of the dish alongside shaved fennel, segments of orange and a good dose of salsa verde and chilli.

And if we did, we would have missed out on the next two plates entirely. House-made potato gnocchi 25 with braised beef shin. I mean really, how could you not? The orecchiette 22 was no slouch, either.

Caramelised apple tart 12 with mascarpone ice cream and a divine set lemon cream 12 that came with high praise from our wonderful waitress. Both are great, but that lemon cream, well, it made our tastebuds bounce. Aside from the cute glass cloche presentation, the arrangement of fresh and freeze-dried mandarin, pistachios, meringue and lemon gel was enchanting. And the flavour — uplifting and incredibly light. Prior to setting off on the next leg of our road trip, it was breakfast at Federal Diner in the centre of town.

This is another popular breakfast-brunch hang-out with a robust selection of edibles. Baked delights tempt you as you walk in past the kitchen counter — pastries, scones and bikkies and the smell of coffee hangs in the air, tempting me order one as soon as we take a seat.

Once again it was me with the morning appetite, going vegetarian with the Hawea flat Crisp fried hunks of polenta with spinach, grilled haloumi, mushrooms and tomato. A decent start to the day before more driving into the South Island wilderness. And those that are up for staying the night can even book a room to sample the bustling Cardrona Village nightlife.

Chowder, burgers, crumbed venison and seafood platters sit alongside fried camembert, nachos and hoisin lamb ribs. Something for just about everyone — even the kiddies. Ok, perhaps not enough peas. Winterslaw and tartare come with it. I already had a few tomatoes on my windowsill, picked from my garden the day before a crow decided to peck away at most of my other tomatoes.

Nice save on my behalf. And they kinda taste nice. I guess my love for native Australian herbs and spices extends across the Tasman, as well. This native herb from New Zealand is now an active member of my spice drawer! Barely two hours on the road and we were pulling into the driveway of our first overnighter.

And check the digs we were shacked-up in. All that was missing was a pair of flamingo statues. Although, the garden did have its share of colourful statuesque critters! Being in town at the end of winter presented us with having most of the place to ourselves. Aside from two local ladies and a small family of three, it was just us at The Fat Duck tucking into a hearty lunch.

Pub and cafe-style food abounds at this chilled eatery in the centre of town, and it was the winter special menu that got our attention. Inside and to the right is a casual bar area, to the left is the humbly-decorated restaurant complete with booths and tables that extend into a separate room. Aside from the awkwardly deep bowl that made eating the Fiordland venison pie 26 a challenge, the chunks of meat were slow-cooked to toothsome tenderness.

A bucket of kumara fries came with it, as did a superfluous and flavour-challenged salad of shredded iceberg, cucumber and carrot. Soy braised pork belly 29 was a must, served atop bok choy and several discs of aromatic West Coast black pudding. It was the native horopito that prompted me to order the chicken wings BBQ sauce sweetens the tender wings and another dose of shredded iceberg salad provides the greenery. Very close to Bailiez is Kepler Restaurant, an eatery with more of a modern hand at the local food it dishes up.

Every flavour complemented the other and the added confit cubes of beet and red currant jus brought delicious pops of sweetness. Dabs of sweet mint sauce sealed the deal. Consistently good coffee, hearty food, friendly service and some killer homemade sweet and savoury muffins. Aside from those delicious muffins — yes we had our share — and the cabinet stocked with cakes, tarts, slices and rolls, the brekkie menu is a celebration of egg dishes, toasties and grains.

The hash brown stack Being in Fiordland and not getting out-and-about would be a bit of a waste of time, so our agenda involved driving from Te Anau to Milford Sound. An early morning rise as a thick fog blanketed the valley pretty much as far as The Divide.

Once high enough in altitude, of course, it was clear skies and valleys in the Mount Christina and Mount Lyttle region. Stunning view, as you can see above. Before the drive through the mountain via Homer Tunnel it was a stop to take in the scenery, stretch the legs and be reminded of the biting cold outside. Exiting Homer Tunnel provided yet another spectacular view. This time over a deep forested valley filled with fog pretty-much all the way to Milford Sound.

No town, as such, can be found there. Free limited wifi comes in handy when the urge to reconnect is required, even if the connection is painfully weak. Snaps to the coffee-maker, as well. So good that we went back for another top-up after our little cruise on the sound. Seals bask in the sunshine at the base of sheer cliffs, snow is dusted high above the waterline and waterfalls plunge into the milky turquoise waters. And there you have it.

Magestic Mitre Peak enshrouded with clouds; the iconic Milford Sound scene that people come far and wide for. With Milford Sound and Te Anau well and truly behind us, the South Island road trip continued in a south-easterly direction with a quick early morning stop at the small township of Lumsden. It was the mural on the local pub that made me pull the car over to snap a few pics. Breezing through town only had one requirement.

Tempting cakes peered from the bench cabinet, but for us it was a couple of coffees whilst seated in old movie theatre seats. Our arrival time coincided perfectly with lunch time and I had eyes for just one place. One thing I did love seeing was greens that had been foraged by either Ken himself or one of his suppliers. Local Gruff junction goat curd 17 took centre stage in the first arrival, tinted with beetroot and piped into brik pastry.

A final chefs flourish of bee pollen completed the picture. A couple of leaves and blanched cavalo nero added greenery. Not to mention the foraged greens, blooms, hazelnuts, apple and native horopito pepper relish. Rhubarb and custard 16 is tricked up with yoghurt, granola and maple syrup ice cream with a preserved raspberry crisp. Fiona from Bracken strongly suggested we take a drive into the Otago Peninsula after she learned we were in town for just one night, and the fact the weather was absolute perfection.

Nature lovers flock to this part of the South Island to see seals, sea lions, penguins and a plethora of birdlife. We so happened to drop by the Royal Albatross Centre where we were lucky enough to witness many of these majestic birds and see them in flight.

This is the worlds only mainland breeding colony for albatross, with all profits going straight back into the maintenance and protection of the area. We gravitated north away from The Octagon to sniff out the more casual eateries past the shopping strip, settling on a bit of Indian for the night.

Shahi Tandoor is a sizeable place with a rather vibrant appearance. Orange walls and ceiling and illuminated pillars depicting bright photos of spices. The amritsari machhi My usual Indian go-to is biryani, so no exceptions were made in choosing the lamb 14 variety.

The rice was quite overcooked, which made everything a little on the sloppy-side. As for the flavour, it was bang on. Tandoori murgh 10 is also flavour-packed. Juicy little pieces of chicken fresh from the oven. Not a great deal seemed to be open for early risers like ourselves. Good for us that Morning Magpie was ready for business, pulling coffees for a stream of regulars that clearly work in the neighbourhood.

No work for us, however, as all we had planned for the day was a bit of driving to our next destination. The main focus at Morning Magpie is the coffee they churn out. Many of the edibles are made in-house, often displayed on the counter for all to see. Cakes, slices, rolls and ready to-go bagel sandwiches. One of the big and rustic savoury scrolls did us fine, as did a creamy mushroom open bagel It comes loaded with spinach and cottage cheese as well. This little roaster and cafe offers nothing more than a handful of baked items, but we do understand you can bring your own food.

You may want to check on that before you pack a lunch and nab one of the tables in this stark and sleek space. The coffee is meticulously made and packs a real punch. Something I needed as it was my turn to drive us to the next destination.

Adventure capital of New Zealand. The ski fields, for a start. The last time we were in Queenstown was somewhere around 18 years ago. Well, perhaps a little. One thing for sure is the landscape upon which Queenstown is built is nothing short of stunning. This is undoubtedly the most popular eatery in town. Take a look at this sexy beast. That would be Chief Wiggum Following the vegetable factor are thick strips of meltingly fatty slow-roasted pork belly with a sweet apricot seeded mustard.

To be blunt, it was nothing short of stupendous and completely overshadowed my rather ordinary burger choice. It all sounded great on paper and looked decent enough, but my sweet bambi The first time we dropped in for coffee we had to sit out in the lane due to every inside seat being occupied. At least the sun was warm, and that fab coffee warmed the innards in no time. Back down on the waterfront at Steamer Wharf there are a number of eating and drinking options.

And what better way to sit and watch the sun set over the snow-dusted Remarkables than al fresco beneath a heater? Some toasted brioche helped soak up some of that broth and, disappointingly, the chef decided to replace the promised rhubarb chutney with a smoked whipped yoghurt.

Sounds interesting enough, but the incredibly intense smokiness was like a jolt to the palate; a questionable condiment to an otherwise bland casserole. I could have eaten them all night.

Perhaps people stuck to their hotel breakfast buffet? Of the couple of options available, Vudu Larder seemed the magnet for the early breakfast punters. The meals are hearty and delicious and the array of house baked sweets and savouries in the long cabinet is rather impressive. How about grilled haloumi 18 with perfectly cooked poached eggs? A coriander-spiked tomato salsa joined in on the yolky fun; as did some toasted tortilla that was smeared with spiced black beans. A blueberry compote crowns the stack with a dollop of orange-vanilla bean ricotta.

Sitting inside to listen to the well-informed commentary was the warmer option, but sitting up on the roof in the freezing cold provided unobstructed views of the remarkable scenery.

The menu is New Zealand through-and-through, with the likes of local venison, lamb, beef and rabbit alongside Pacific Island style cod and sweet pav for dessert. Ours was a relatively light lunch that involved — for starters — some intriguing chickpea chips with truffle salt Too many things were screaming to me from the extensive menu. Confit duck pancakes, coconut fried chicken and potted rabbit, to name a few. And then there was the braised beef cheek 22 ; tenderly sliced and served with roasted cauliflower and juicy raisins.

Some collagen-rich goodness that hit all the right places. A salad of salt baked beets 18 took care of the vegetable element, with the addition of peppery watercress, almonds and sheep feta. Take sitting on the waterfront and having a few drinks, or shopping for a new pair of sunglasses because yours mysteriously disappeared.

The options are aplenty. Frisbee enthusiasts can even partake in a rather unique activity called Disc Golf. That would be a fellow named Chris Scott. Hot and fresh from the oven, the bread is very fluffy, a little sweet and sprinkled with rosemary and sea salt. Cheese and honey always work, in my eyes, so thumbs-up here. I liked the play of textures with the Moko smoked eel 22 ; small firm pieces of eel, golden, yellow and red beets, crunchy black quinoa and watercress.

There was meant to be horseradish in there somewhere, but it barely showed its face. I must be honest, I prefer the town without the hoards, and seeing it enshrouded in smoke from burning fireplaces added a mystique to the whole setting. These guys know how to get my attention. The name says it all with the goods that are on offer — gourmet pantry and fridge edibles, fresh bread and baked goods made daily, local ceramics and baking accessories.

I may be generalising a tad, but they seem to know their stuff. Following a few days in Mount Maunganui , we landed in Wellington and grabbed a hire car from the airport. I knew of a good place, and thanks to it being in close proximity to the airport, it was time for the eating and coffee-drinking to commence. The Larder is a homely neighbourhood restaurant that not only makes a fine coffee, but the breakfast hits all the right places.

Brekkie for me was the croque madame 17 , crowned with an egg spilling its glorious innards onto the plate. Down by the waterfront is one of many Mojo coffee outlets that can be found peppered across town, and the country. The beans are roasted locally; opposite this outlet, actually. The menu covers breakfast and all your usual lunch suspects. Breakfast was why we were there. This match box-of-a-place was something we happened to have walked past, looked at one another, then did a u-turn and stuck our noses in.

Punch Coffee Bar is nothing more than a bunker-like hole in the wall. A small counter, an espresso machine and two tables out the front. These guys mean serious business when it comes to the bean. Havana Coffee Works skipped traditional roasting methods and went for a fluid bed hot air roaster, a device that cooks the beans more evenly.

Plungers, grinders, machines, merchandise and, of course, the beans they roast onsite. I kinda liked the look and sound of this place. Cute name with cute surroundings. The attraction here was, firstly, the hole-in-the-wall location and, secondly, a pair of young hipsters manning the bunker. These guys looked like they had it going in the coffee department. Two chairs on the footpath, a retro formica side table, and two middle-aged non-hipsters getting in on the coffee action.

That would be me and the other half. Find it opposite the bus stop. A little out of the centre, out near the airport, is this small neighbourhood cafe in Strathmore. I need the recipe for those scones! Back in town, I thought this place would be a good spot to take a load off for a few minutes.

No food for us, though. It was all about the macchiato and piccolo latte. The macchiato was actually perfection. Short pour, tiny bit of milk and a seriously gutsy bean. Another breakfast brought us to the iconic Floriditas.

The creamy eggs were the absolute star. Weaker than a cafe latte. Not great at all. Back to Mojo, it was down on the corner of Wakefield and Taranaki that we had our last coffees before hitting the airport to head home.

Aside from The Rock being a designer geometric structure, Mojo takes pride of place within it. Not that I needed anymore caffeine, as I was already flying on about three cups of coffee. This one was made better than the one down on Wakefield. But for now, it was time to head home. And that, we did. For a night, anyway.

Definitely worth the coffee pit stop. Overall a rather decent dinner spread. Haast The first sign of civilisation in these wild and rugged parts is at Haast, a tiny township a few kilometres from the coast. It was time for lunch 2. Don't skip out on the horseradish: It's pungency is what breathes new life into leftover veggies.

Because the pork is so lean, the meatballs cook in just 8 minutes. Match made in San Antonio Heaven: Image 1 of Image 2 of Image 3 of Image 4 of Image 5 of Image 6 of Image 7 of Image 8 of Short shorts and cowboy boots: Image 9 of Image 10 of Texans love to drink this stuff by the gallon, all year long.

Image 11 of Every state has it, but not every state "gets it. Image 12 of Image 13 of Image 14 of Find a river in Texas and you will eventually find some Texans in it with some tubes and beers.

Image 15 of True, it is more of a South Texas thing, but that does not make it any less a cult hit. Image 16 of Image 17 of Image 18 of Image 19 of Image 20 of We only really need two musicians in Texas, and George is one of them. Image 21 of Image 22 of Image 23 of Image 24 of Image 25 of Eating this before a meal is about as natural as eating peanuts when drinking beer. Image 26 of In many highfalutin circles in Texas, big hair is still all the rage.

Image 27 of Save your pork for Yankees, it's gotta be beef, it's gotta be spicy and really, ditch the sauce. Image 28 of Image 29 of Image 30 of Image 31 of We love to shoot and eat animals down here. Even our vegetarians hunt. Image 32 of State Fair of Texas: Image 33 of In Texas, you either drive a truck, or know someone who does.

Probably more than one someone.

you ever

It has an unmistakable white fish flavour that works really well on a pizza, especially with a spritz of fresh lemon. A few cashews provide a little more crunch. Opposite the entrance of the minute walking loop is the Pancake Rocks Cafe, a place where I so happened to find the best macchiato on the trip. Less than an hour up the coast is the port town of Westport. Some come for the seal colony at Cape Foulwind, others may visit for the Coaltown Museum.

This pair, however, was only in town to grab a bite. Not the most effective way to gauge a towns dining scene, but something tells me we lucked out with the end result. The Town House can be found at the north end of the main drag up in the more industrial part of Westport. You can see what I went for. With food that good it was a given that we sample desserts. A rather enormous dark chocolate mousse 15 is presented in a thin chocolate cylinder, joined with poached rhubarb and ginger crumble.

An orange Cointreau syrup boozed things up a tad and a ginger semifreddo was the perfect accompaniment. The next nights accommodation was a 2.

Pretty spectacular, mind you, and worthy of a quick stop to get a few pics. Known for its thermal pools and alpine scenery, the resort town of Hanmer Springs was our next overnight stop. Not that we came close to immersing ourselves in the thermal pools or great outdoors. Drinks at the pub, more like it. Quiet night at the pub, methinks. At the top of town is Malabar, a gorgeous little restaurant owned by a couple that decided to move from Mumbai to little old Hanmer Springs.

From the warm crackling fire to the warm and welcoming service, this is one gem on the Hanmer dining scene. Taking the innovative Asian route this restaurant is known for, the pan-seared scallops 24 were nothing short of divine.

The magic touch came with a light sprinkling of Earl Grey salt. Our main courses were unmistakably Indian — such as the chicken tikka Served on the bone, the tender bits of chicken take on the deep richness of the creamy sauce.

Very tasty, even if it had a high price point. Breakfast offerings were very sparse, but thanks to spotting the Powerhouse opposite the pub we had drinks at the evening before, we already knew where to go. A little rich for my early morning stomach, but I relished every spiced grain of rice in this salmon-heavy dish. Not only was there cold smoked salmon, but generous chunks of hot smoked salmon were flecked throughout.

And that oozing egg made things all the better. Pre-made rolls and sandwiches, pies, cakes and slices are the go at this relic on the junction of two state highways.

Eat inside beneath the leadlights, or out in the fresh valley air and sunshine. Two pubs, a museum, a couple of places to grab groceries and a few other places of interest for anyone breezing through town.

Miraculously I left empty-handed. In the centre of town next to the Commercial Hotel is the Vault Cafe, taking residence in the former historic Bank of New Zealand building. At the centre of the cafe is the robust vault that once held the fortunes of local gold miners and growing community. Great chunks of tender meat and delicious flaky pastry. The apple slice was pretty special, as well. Many variations are out there, so why not add my own to the mix?

One way to fix that, right? Add more types of ginger, I say. I want that burning sensation! It took a few tests to get this recipe just as I like it.

Sadly the first was a soft and sticky affair that was a cross between a soft ANZAC cookie and ginger crunch. Many are topped with almonds, but it was salted pistachios for me. The salt calms the sweetness a tad. The slab could easily make 20 squares. Use your own sweet tooth to figure out which slicing method is best.

An hours drive north of Dunedin is a much visited geological site known as the Moeraki Boulders. Such rock formations can be seen in many places across New Zealand, but the ones at Moeraki are probably the most visited and photographed.

Ninety minutes north of Moeraki is the small port city of Timaru, our first food stop of the day. In retrospect, we probably should have wandered about the city centre a little more to check out the beautiful bluestone Edwardian and Victorian buildings, but once the appetite was sated, we kind of forgot.

The lunch menu may not offer as much as the one at dinner, but the six or seven options are solid examples of English and Continental bistro-style fare. The savouries were so good that desserts were a given. Warmed slice of orange syrup cake 12 , a scattering of pistachio crumble and healthy dollop of thick yoghurt.

Just as warming was the toffee apple grunt Beneath the biscuit top is baked apple and boysenberries, bourbon-soaked prunes and pine nuts. The remnants of hazy memories from my first visit to Tekapo involve a multitude of colourful lupins, an old church and killer sandflies. Not much has changed other than us missing lupin season and those biting insects not being so prevalent.

As for the Church of the Good Shepherd, well, you can scroll down and see it yourself. Tekapo, as with most of the South Island, presents itself as a bit of a postcard. A rippling turquoise-coloured lake framed by the snow-dusted Southern Alps. Many come for the hot springs, air safaris, skiing and trekking, but another activity so happens to be star gazing. Overlooking the village is the Mount John Observatory, a place that takes full advantage of the clear night skies and low levels of local light pollution.

Food-wise, the offerings are all about sandwiches, bagels and a few cakes. Being such a small village means the eating options are relatively limited. Not a village in a quaint kind of way; more like a glorified strip mall, really. Tin Plate is a relative newcomer to the town, feeding-up visitors with pizza, pasta and piada — a type of pita roll loaded with things like spiced pulled pork, meatballs or chorizo and prawn.

It was carne pizza 22 for this one — topped with venison, beef, lamb and mushrooms. A similar reaction with the penne Meagre in size and a little too al dente. At least the flavours were good — with bacon, garlic, chilli and basil.

Cakes, slices, wraps and sandwiches fill the cabinets, with platters of fresh scones filling the air with their buttery scent. High country fried eggs House-made muesli with three slices of poached pear and yoghurt. Rather steep in price, but tasty none the less. You can even base yourself in the village at one of a handful of accommodations. We were at a safe distance, so watching ice and rock tumble down a mountain was seriously spectacular.

As far as a town goes, this one is a bit of a youngster. The town centre is merely a cluster of strip mall-type buildings that contain services and most of the eateries.

Yes, they even have a grappa menu. I guess it was only midday and I was driving, so no booze just yet. The lunch menu is a mixed bag of top-notch cafe fare.

I went all out and ordered the confit duck leg An enormous shallow dish that also contained a spiced wild game cassoulet of pancetta, venison sausage, veg and white beans. A much lighter lamb shoulder 20 resembled an open sandwich, of sorts. More than a dozen pens cluster in the water around the shop, with access to a couple of them if you feel like tossing the salmon pellets and creating a wild feeding frenzy.

Inside the shop you can purchase hot and cold salmon, whole fish or fillets, sashimi lunch packs; even free range eggs, local honey and chutneys.

Well worth the stop-in if you want to stretch the legs, get some fresh air and some of that fresh salmon grown just metres away. En route to our next overnighter is a blink-and-miss-it locale called Tarras. The Tarras Country Cafe offers country style breakfasts and a few lunch options like polenta cakes, bagels, salads and sandwiches.

Caffeine and sugar was all I needed to stay alert, so macchiato and ginger crunch it was. The town of Wanaka fits the same kind of template as Tekapo. Gorgeous lake back-dropped by the Southern Alps, walking, hiking and skiing. Wanaka is a larger town, has a lot more buzz and a more diverse food scene. Happy hour, of course. It was time to get stuck into some local vino, chat and watch the sun go down over Lake Wanaka. Next door to the bar is BoaBoa Food Company. Nothing more than a takeaway with a few seats for those that are lucky enough to get them.

If burgers are your thing, then this is a good place to start. There are twelve to choose from. Thin crumb and steaming, flakey fish innards. Sadly the meat was overcooked and incredibly dry and the chilli jam and beet relish was nowhere to be seen.

The kitchen seemed to be on the verge of melt-down due to a massive influx of people placing orders on this particular visitation, and the few guys in there were barely coping with it all. Interrupting them may have become contentious. As the sunrise hit the surrounding snowcapped peaks, we emerged from our humble Alpine Motel in search of food and coffee. It seemed I was the only one with an appetite that morning, tucking into my baked mushrooms Rich, earthy and loaded with parmesan, peas, tiny croutons and oozing egg.

Bacon on the side, of course. That rocky knoll that rises metres above the town is Mount Iron. Most people would drive past and not think more about it, others have the desire to climb it after breakfast. Nothing like a bit of a sweat in the morning, right?

And I guess the view is pretty special — down the Cardrona and Upper Clutha Valleys, over both lakes and a virtual wall of mountains. Sadly, for us, the fuel indicator decided to flash red halfway up, forcing us to turn around as the nearest petrol station was way back in Wanaka. Note to self — check fuel levels before driving up mountains. Dinner choices in Wanaka are aplenty, but it pays to book ahead or get in early, as many of the good restaurants fill up very quickly.

Unfortunate for us was they were solidly booked, but if we were ok with it, one of the outside tables was available for the next hour. All of that aside, it was well worth the slight discomfort.

For a start, the handmade beetroot agnolotti And then the Aoraki salmon salad There was no holding back on the hot-smoked salmon as it took up most of the dish alongside shaved fennel, segments of orange and a good dose of salsa verde and chilli.

And if we did, we would have missed out on the next two plates entirely. House-made potato gnocchi 25 with braised beef shin. I mean really, how could you not? The orecchiette 22 was no slouch, either. Caramelised apple tart 12 with mascarpone ice cream and a divine set lemon cream 12 that came with high praise from our wonderful waitress.

Both are great, but that lemon cream, well, it made our tastebuds bounce. Aside from the cute glass cloche presentation, the arrangement of fresh and freeze-dried mandarin, pistachios, meringue and lemon gel was enchanting. And the flavour — uplifting and incredibly light. Prior to setting off on the next leg of our road trip, it was breakfast at Federal Diner in the centre of town.

This is another popular breakfast-brunch hang-out with a robust selection of edibles. Baked delights tempt you as you walk in past the kitchen counter — pastries, scones and bikkies and the smell of coffee hangs in the air, tempting me order one as soon as we take a seat. Once again it was me with the morning appetite, going vegetarian with the Hawea flat Crisp fried hunks of polenta with spinach, grilled haloumi, mushrooms and tomato.

A decent start to the day before more driving into the South Island wilderness. And those that are up for staying the night can even book a room to sample the bustling Cardrona Village nightlife.

Chowder, burgers, crumbed venison and seafood platters sit alongside fried camembert, nachos and hoisin lamb ribs. Something for just about everyone — even the kiddies. Ok, perhaps not enough peas. Winterslaw and tartare come with it. I already had a few tomatoes on my windowsill, picked from my garden the day before a crow decided to peck away at most of my other tomatoes. Nice save on my behalf. And they kinda taste nice. I guess my love for native Australian herbs and spices extends across the Tasman, as well.

This native herb from New Zealand is now an active member of my spice drawer! Barely two hours on the road and we were pulling into the driveway of our first overnighter.

And check the digs we were shacked-up in. All that was missing was a pair of flamingo statues. Although, the garden did have its share of colourful statuesque critters! Being in town at the end of winter presented us with having most of the place to ourselves.

Aside from two local ladies and a small family of three, it was just us at The Fat Duck tucking into a hearty lunch. Pub and cafe-style food abounds at this chilled eatery in the centre of town, and it was the winter special menu that got our attention.

Inside and to the right is a casual bar area, to the left is the humbly-decorated restaurant complete with booths and tables that extend into a separate room. Aside from the awkwardly deep bowl that made eating the Fiordland venison pie 26 a challenge, the chunks of meat were slow-cooked to toothsome tenderness. A bucket of kumara fries came with it, as did a superfluous and flavour-challenged salad of shredded iceberg, cucumber and carrot. Soy braised pork belly 29 was a must, served atop bok choy and several discs of aromatic West Coast black pudding.

It was the native horopito that prompted me to order the chicken wings BBQ sauce sweetens the tender wings and another dose of shredded iceberg salad provides the greenery. Very close to Bailiez is Kepler Restaurant, an eatery with more of a modern hand at the local food it dishes up. Every flavour complemented the other and the added confit cubes of beet and red currant jus brought delicious pops of sweetness.

Dabs of sweet mint sauce sealed the deal. Consistently good coffee, hearty food, friendly service and some killer homemade sweet and savoury muffins. Aside from those delicious muffins — yes we had our share — and the cabinet stocked with cakes, tarts, slices and rolls, the brekkie menu is a celebration of egg dishes, toasties and grains. The hash brown stack Being in Fiordland and not getting out-and-about would be a bit of a waste of time, so our agenda involved driving from Te Anau to Milford Sound.

An early morning rise as a thick fog blanketed the valley pretty much as far as The Divide. Once high enough in altitude, of course, it was clear skies and valleys in the Mount Christina and Mount Lyttle region. Stunning view, as you can see above. Before the drive through the mountain via Homer Tunnel it was a stop to take in the scenery, stretch the legs and be reminded of the biting cold outside.

Exiting Homer Tunnel provided yet another spectacular view. This time over a deep forested valley filled with fog pretty-much all the way to Milford Sound. No town, as such, can be found there. Free limited wifi comes in handy when the urge to reconnect is required, even if the connection is painfully weak. Snaps to the coffee-maker, as well. So good that we went back for another top-up after our little cruise on the sound.

Seals bask in the sunshine at the base of sheer cliffs, snow is dusted high above the waterline and waterfalls plunge into the milky turquoise waters.

And there you have it. Magestic Mitre Peak enshrouded with clouds; the iconic Milford Sound scene that people come far and wide for. With Milford Sound and Te Anau well and truly behind us, the South Island road trip continued in a south-easterly direction with a quick early morning stop at the small township of Lumsden. It was the mural on the local pub that made me pull the car over to snap a few pics. Breezing through town only had one requirement.

Tempting cakes peered from the bench cabinet, but for us it was a couple of coffees whilst seated in old movie theatre seats. Our arrival time coincided perfectly with lunch time and I had eyes for just one place. One thing I did love seeing was greens that had been foraged by either Ken himself or one of his suppliers. Local Gruff junction goat curd 17 took centre stage in the first arrival, tinted with beetroot and piped into brik pastry.

A final chefs flourish of bee pollen completed the picture. A couple of leaves and blanched cavalo nero added greenery. Not to mention the foraged greens, blooms, hazelnuts, apple and native horopito pepper relish.

Rhubarb and custard 16 is tricked up with yoghurt, granola and maple syrup ice cream with a preserved raspberry crisp. Fiona from Bracken strongly suggested we take a drive into the Otago Peninsula after she learned we were in town for just one night, and the fact the weather was absolute perfection. Nature lovers flock to this part of the South Island to see seals, sea lions, penguins and a plethora of birdlife. We so happened to drop by the Royal Albatross Centre where we were lucky enough to witness many of these majestic birds and see them in flight.

This is the worlds only mainland breeding colony for albatross, with all profits going straight back into the maintenance and protection of the area. We gravitated north away from The Octagon to sniff out the more casual eateries past the shopping strip, settling on a bit of Indian for the night.

Shahi Tandoor is a sizeable place with a rather vibrant appearance. Orange walls and ceiling and illuminated pillars depicting bright photos of spices. The amritsari machhi My usual Indian go-to is biryani, so no exceptions were made in choosing the lamb 14 variety. The rice was quite overcooked, which made everything a little on the sloppy-side. As for the flavour, it was bang on.

Tandoori murgh 10 is also flavour-packed. Juicy little pieces of chicken fresh from the oven. Not a great deal seemed to be open for early risers like ourselves. Good for us that Morning Magpie was ready for business, pulling coffees for a stream of regulars that clearly work in the neighbourhood. No work for us, however, as all we had planned for the day was a bit of driving to our next destination.

The main focus at Morning Magpie is the coffee they churn out. Many of the edibles are made in-house, often displayed on the counter for all to see. Cakes, slices, rolls and ready to-go bagel sandwiches. One of the big and rustic savoury scrolls did us fine, as did a creamy mushroom open bagel It comes loaded with spinach and cottage cheese as well. This little roaster and cafe offers nothing more than a handful of baked items, but we do understand you can bring your own food.

You may want to check on that before you pack a lunch and nab one of the tables in this stark and sleek space. The coffee is meticulously made and packs a real punch. Something I needed as it was my turn to drive us to the next destination. Adventure capital of New Zealand. The ski fields, for a start. The last time we were in Queenstown was somewhere around 18 years ago.

Well, perhaps a little. One thing for sure is the landscape upon which Queenstown is built is nothing short of stunning. This is undoubtedly the most popular eatery in town. Take a look at this sexy beast. That would be Chief Wiggum Following the vegetable factor are thick strips of meltingly fatty slow-roasted pork belly with a sweet apricot seeded mustard.

To be blunt, it was nothing short of stupendous and completely overshadowed my rather ordinary burger choice. It all sounded great on paper and looked decent enough, but my sweet bambi The first time we dropped in for coffee we had to sit out in the lane due to every inside seat being occupied.

At least the sun was warm, and that fab coffee warmed the innards in no time. Back down on the waterfront at Steamer Wharf there are a number of eating and drinking options.

And what better way to sit and watch the sun set over the snow-dusted Remarkables than al fresco beneath a heater? Some toasted brioche helped soak up some of that broth and, disappointingly, the chef decided to replace the promised rhubarb chutney with a smoked whipped yoghurt.

Sounds interesting enough, but the incredibly intense smokiness was like a jolt to the palate; a questionable condiment to an otherwise bland casserole. I could have eaten them all night. Perhaps people stuck to their hotel breakfast buffet?

Of the couple of options available, Vudu Larder seemed the magnet for the early breakfast punters. The meals are hearty and delicious and the array of house baked sweets and savouries in the long cabinet is rather impressive. How about grilled haloumi 18 with perfectly cooked poached eggs? A coriander-spiked tomato salsa joined in on the yolky fun; as did some toasted tortilla that was smeared with spiced black beans. A blueberry compote crowns the stack with a dollop of orange-vanilla bean ricotta.

Sitting inside to listen to the well-informed commentary was the warmer option, but sitting up on the roof in the freezing cold provided unobstructed views of the remarkable scenery. The menu is New Zealand through-and-through, with the likes of local venison, lamb, beef and rabbit alongside Pacific Island style cod and sweet pav for dessert. Ours was a relatively light lunch that involved — for starters — some intriguing chickpea chips with truffle salt Too many things were screaming to me from the extensive menu.

Confit duck pancakes, coconut fried chicken and potted rabbit, to name a few. And then there was the braised beef cheek 22 ; tenderly sliced and served with roasted cauliflower and juicy raisins. Some collagen-rich goodness that hit all the right places. A salad of salt baked beets 18 took care of the vegetable element, with the addition of peppery watercress, almonds and sheep feta. Take sitting on the waterfront and having a few drinks, or shopping for a new pair of sunglasses because yours mysteriously disappeared.

The options are aplenty. Frisbee enthusiasts can even partake in a rather unique activity called Disc Golf. That would be a fellow named Chris Scott. Hot and fresh from the oven, the bread is very fluffy, a little sweet and sprinkled with rosemary and sea salt.

Cheese and honey always work, in my eyes, so thumbs-up here. I liked the play of textures with the Moko smoked eel 22 ; small firm pieces of eel, golden, yellow and red beets, crunchy black quinoa and watercress. Most likely though it is because you can find fried versions of nearly every known food. An upcoming festival on the PuroSanAntonio level involves two things people here love most: The event is going on its fourth year of perfection, and festivals are twice a year, in the spring and fall.

The channel owner runs a food vlog where she films weird and wonderful food creations from around the world including cotton candy art in Toyko and black crepes in Bangkok. Travel Thirsty via Storyful ","pubdate": Buzz60's Maria Mercedes Galuppo mariamgaluppo has more. Don't skip out on the horseradish: It's pungency is what breathes new life into leftover veggies. Because the pork is so lean, the meatballs cook in just 8 minutes. Match made in San Antonio Heaven: Image 1 of Image 2 of Image 3 of Image 4 of Image 5 of Image 6 of Image 7 of Image 8 of Short shorts and cowboy boots: Image 9 of Image 10 of Texans love to drink this stuff by the gallon, all year long.

Image 11 of Every state has it, but not every state "gets it. Image 12 of Image 13 of Image 14 of Find a river in Texas and you will eventually find some Texans in it with some tubes and beers.

Image 15 of True, it is more of a South Texas thing, but that does not make it any less a cult hit. Image 16 of Image 17 of Image 18 of Image 19 of Image 20 of We only really need two musicians in Texas, and George is one of them. Image 21 of Image 22 of Image 23 of Image 24 of Image 25 of Eating this before a meal is about as natural as eating peanuts when drinking beer. Image 26 of In many highfalutin circles in Texas, big hair is still all the rage.

Image 27 of Save your pork for Yankees, it's gotta be beef, it's gotta be spicy and really, ditch the sauce. Image 28 of Image 29 of Image 30 of Image 31 of We love to shoot and eat animals down here.

James Quinn The Pokies Big Red And Barbacoa Potato

Here's a great band from San Antonio (also where I live!) that gets no airplay, except maybe from college radio. In the 60's or early 70's, "Big Red & Barbacoa" would 4/5(2). If Lay's were puro: Big Red and Barbacoa chips would change the way San Antonio crunches. By Madalyn Mendoza, coinsluckyz.com Updated . Feb 10,  · Tommy's Restaurant: Tip Top Mexican Food! Big Red & Barbacoa!! - See 18 traveler reviews, 10 candid photos, and great deals for San Antonio, TX, at Location: Nogalitos St, San Antonio, TX

Frequently asked questions

What Cruises are aplenty ranging from?

Great recipe and very easy!! Very very easy to make, we have them on every holiday at work, but with different cake flavors, they turn out really soft. A blend of eggs and corn tortilla strips smothered in ranchera sauce and melted cheese. Own or manage this property? Huevos a La Mexicana. It was great then and great now!! Probably more than one someone.

Which seeing issue one the best method?

These really are as easy as everyone says! Image 12 of Probably have a Big Red next to it, too. This place is a Central Texas icon. Image 30 of

Whom you find yourself gaggle the?

None listed See when people check in People tend to check in during these times: Breakfast is served all day. Lone Star Beer may be named for the state, but at any block party or river outing you can bet your boots someone brought some Shiner. Aroma of strawberries dipped in chocolate! Ranked of 4, Restaurants in San Antonio.

Can nothing all like?

ACS trying to find owner of balding dog with mysterious tattoo. Image 13 of Tip Top Mexican Food! I made this recipe with red velvet cake mix with powdered sugar on top after they were baked, very yummy. Image 4 of