Pokies Biggest Win Quibids Auctions

Tuesday, December 28, Quibids vs eBay: Where to Shop for Discounts. Quibids vs eBay is a question that a lot of shoppers face especially during the holiday season. Both these websites are well established in their field and it can be a tough choice to make. Both eBay and Quibids offer some really great discounts and deals. So how do the two compare? The auction models of eBay and Quibids are totally different.

Quibids is a penny auction site, which is a bidding fee auction model. On the other hand, eBay is a traditional auction site which more people are familiar with. On eBay, the bids are totally free and you only pay if you win the item. There are some main differences between Quibids and eBay. The most important difference arises in the bidding model as mentioned above. Also, eBay is much more general in that there are millions of more items on eBay.

On this count, Quibids vs eBay becomes a meaningless question because you can literally find everything on eBay. The items that you find on Quibids are quite limited. However, for the items that are sold on Quibids, you can get far higher discount on Quibids than eBay. However, as expected, there is a catch. You will need to pay for the bids that you place, which means you can lose money even without winning.

This is an impossibility at eBay. Pokies Win Nz Manufacturing Stretch you do not win the item, you lose nothing.

Thus to answer the question of Quibids vs eBay for the products that are sold at both the stores, it really depends on you. If you like taking some calculated risks, you should try Quibids. If you are risk-averse, prefer eBay.

If you want to try Quibids, read my post on Getting free Quibids bids before joining so you can make some good profits right from the start. Also, if you like Quibids, you should certainly try out the other penny auctions as well. This is because sometimes Quibids can get really competitive. The newer penny auction sites have fewer bidders and thus lesser competition, so your chances can be improved.

Also, a lot of them give you free bids while joining, so you might just win something out of these free bids, which would be great - to win hands down without any investment. The post talked about Quibids vs eBay and some differences that you should keep in mind. There are risks associated with Quibids, but the rewards can be sweet. Posted by Sid Kal at 1: Quibids gave away free bids on Christmas. There was however a catch: It seems that neither the heavy spenders nor the rare visitors were the lucky group.

Personally, I never received any free Quibids bids on Christmas. However, if you visit the Facebook page of Quibids, you will see some people thanking Quibids for their free bids. This seems disappointing that only a few people should be given free bids while others are denied.

I was hopeful that I would get something from them for the New Year but no gift. They did send out an email for wishes, but that's no good now, is it? So how did Quibids decide who would get free Quibids bids? Posted by Sid Kal at 2: So I was just looking for penny auctions in general and not just Quibids and stumbled upon a very interesting thing - Quibids doesn't show up in Google if you type penny auctions!

I find this quite interesting. After all, Quibids is perhaps Pokies Biggest Win Quibids Auctions biggest penny auction site on the internet today. Quibids had the millionth auction recently, which is a great achievement.

So why doesn't Quibids show up for penny auctions in Google? There are many possible explanations for this.

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  • But you probably haven't hit up the penny auctions yet, and that could be a good thing, depending on how you go about it. One of the biggest penny auction sites in the news today is QuiBids, an online auctioneer that charges $ for each bid—and I'm not talking winning bids—I'm talking every bid.

I assume that Quibids doesn't want to identify itself with the other penny auction sites. I assume this is because Quibids wants to stand out from the rest of the crowd. In addition, penny auctions seem to have a bad connotation attached today with so many of them, like Swipebids, turning into outright scams. Also, there are new penny auction sites opening up in every nook and corner of the internet. Perhaps Quibids doesn't really want to be seen in the same league as these.

What I also find interesting is that there is no Quibids ad showing up in Google for the keyword "penny auctions". Quibids is an aggressive advertiser and I have seen Quibids ads everywhere. In fact, I discovered Quibids through a similar advertisement a very long time ago. However, Quibids doesn't even want to advertise to people looking for penny auctions. This is indeed surprising because I am sure a lot of penny auction searchers can do with a far better version of Plundr and Beezid.

Posted by Sid Kal at 8: Friday, December 24, Quibids Details: Phone Number, Address etc. This post is just to provide more information like Quibids phone number and address to those searching for it. Quibids is a relatively open company as compared to tons of other penny auction sites. Here is some information about Quibids. This is taken directly from their BBB page.

Jeff Geurts Director of PR: A- Total complaints received by BBB: Different Auctions for Different Users. There are allegations that Quibids is using a trap page to direct different users to different auctions. This is alleged to be a Quibids scam and not legit by some. The reply that Quibids customer service agent gave to a user doesn't help matters much either.

So what is a Quibids trap page? Simply put, there are different pages for different users so that there are different auctions for different bidders.

I think the way it goes is that Quibids collects the data from different users and classifies them in different categories. The bigger bidders who spend and bid aggressively are grouped together into one category, so that they compete with each other and not smaller bidders. So if you are winning a lot on Quibids, you will find it harder to win in the future. The Quibids customer support reply says that they have different auctions for different people to maximize their winnings.

This is obviously untrue because they want to have the aggressive bidders bid with each other, because otherwise they could win most of the items and leave others unhappy.

This would also reduce Quibids' earnings. While I don't think this counts as a Quibids scam, it does seem suspicious.

I think they should mention this somewhere on their website, because otherwise it seems misleading. So how do we know that Quibids is actually using a trap page? Simple - clear your cookies and note all the auctions that are present on the page.

Now log in with your account and you will find that there are Pokies Biggest Win Quibids Auctions auctions present. So you might see some auction when you are not logged in and then all of a sudden when you log in, this auction could disappear for you. Is this a Quibids scam? There seem to be some legal implications Pokies Biggest Win Quibids Auctions I am not really sure.

There is only hype at this stage. I don't think there are any lawsuits filed. You can read the entire discussion on PennyAuctionsWatch article. You can try this out yourself - clear the cookies and you will see different auctions than when you are logged in. I think Quibids saves cookies to determine how much you win and which auctions Pokies Win Nz Ird Online show. Better still, if you have a friend somewhere else, you could compare notes on which Quibids auctions you both see.

So what do you think about this Quibids trap page? The penny auction watch comments seem to suggest otherwise, but certainly you cannot believe all the rant on the internet.

Posted by Sid Kal at Thursday, December 23, Quibids Featured Auctions. Quibids is rolling out new features and new auctions once again.

This time, they are coming up with Quibids Featured Auctions. This is a weekly featured auction that will be a big-ticket item.

Worth Quibids Auctions Pokies Biggest Win

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Used really Pokies Big Win Nfl Playoff isn't such thing

  1. Other times it takes more bids than, sometimes as many as ten bids, even for expensive, high-end products! Here are 11 pretty amazing recent QuiBids auction wins we found that customers scored here on the site. Does your best-ever auction win compare to any of these? Tell us in the comments! QuiBids  Missing: pokies.:
    The public penny auction stats Bid-Ninja shows for QuiBids (along with the other biggest names in penny auctions) has seen a tremendous amount of new incoming data. Our leaderboard is constantly changing and there are so many auctions with new names showing as the winner. Compare this to  Missing: pokies. I tried to use the Quibids system to find deals. I found that it requires a great deal of time and loss of many bids (each costing money) to wind up with nothing if you don't have time and a large stash of bids (which costs money). After a year of inactivity, I realized I still had an account. I asked them to end my account and refund. Quibids also had an option to 'buyout' the item once you had spent the equivalent amount of bids to the retail price. permalink; embed .. Yeah, my guess is that the four big bidders are actually Beezid in some form and they only make a profit on all the little red bidders on the chart less the cost of the iPad.
  2. On eBay, the bids are totally free and you only pay if you win the item. Quibids-vs-eBay. There are some main differences between Quibids and eBay. The most After all, Quibids is perhaps the biggest penny auction site on the internet today. .. Experienced Quibids users may easily see through this.:
    I'm probably the biggest skeptic I know, so I just had to see and I must say that it was actually a really good read! Of course there are no sure ways to beat the . In this case, I was given a copy of this Quibids buying guide that is supposed to help you win at Quibids auctions. Naturally, I felt like this was just. CHOICE looks into reports of dodgy dealings in online penny and one-cent auctions, where you may end up paying more than you bargained for. One of the sites, QuiBids, demonstratively parades some of their winners on their front page. Lurker saved $, it proclaims! "It's worse than the pokies!" says Greg James. QuiBids – These guys are the big boys on the block. They have a ton of auctions every day from the very cheap and easy to win items to the high end stuff. They auction off all kinds of things including trips to New York, gas scooters, Dyson Vacuums and a whole lot more. The most unique thing about QuiBids is that % of.
  3. What's to stop the site owner winning every auction, particularly if they convieniently extend the auction time (?to allow themselves to bid)? 'They" win by getting your money when you bid, not when you .. One of the biggest ones that has been around for a fair while overseas is coinsluckyz.com:
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The Pokies Biggest Win Quibids Auctions very first step needs looking into

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You have to buy bids so it's quite obvious what you are getting yourself into, and you are bidding against an item so you might lose. The issue comes is if you do win, do they actually send you the item. For them they probably try really hard to send the items so people will still playing. But if the company running the site is rigging the system by "buying" their own products, that sounds extremely illegal to me.

At least casinos have regulatory bodies that ensure that jackpots actually pay out as advertised. This is exactly what happend to a a few auction sites I tried a few years ago. I would be bedding on an item and about to win. In the final second, a random person who never bid before, would bid really high and win. Sometimes paying more than actual retail price. That exact product would then magically appear for auction again a minute later.

Turns out if the item wasn't selling for enough profit, a bot would come in and overbid everyone else. Then turn around and try again. As far as I know, most of these companies were shut down. This is already such a shady system that I firmly believe most of these auction sites are already more crooked then they appear. This strategy would work if they didn't make it so obvious.

Like, make the bot bid from time to time, not like you said "someone who never bid before". Don't make the bids very high, above the retail price. Don't make the bot place a bid literally in the last few seconds. Also, the item needs to "rest" at least a few hours, or a few days to be more secure, before it appears again. All those things and possibly more would have made it a lot harder to spot that it's a bot and not a person, but it seems like whoever made the bot was either dumb or very greedy, or both.

I suspect the bots are trying to make it appear as if many more people are actually bidding on the product than there really are. Creating that sense of "urgency". It's like The Button experiment here on reddit. Every click resets timer to 60 seconds, last person to click wins. The difference is on penny auctions every click costs money, there's an actual prize if you win by being the last clicker, and there are thousands of buttons. But do human bidders ever win these auctions or do bots always win and just take some stock photos of "winners"?

Someone should start an AMA request for people who have won sometime from a penny auction site. I won a PS3 on quibids back in Quidbids, and I'm pretty sure the rest of these sites, don't have inventory; I received the item direct from Amazon. If the website is running bots, it costs the company no money for the bots to bid, but they are still racking up money from the real users. Quibids also had an option to 'buyout' the item once you had spent the equivalent amount of bids to the retail price.

Ok so maybe you can help me understand this, because there's something terribly illogical about it. So you bought into the bidding process for, let's say, 40 cents, and your bid was now 1. But that doesn't make any sense. Why would you waste 40 cents? Clearly someone else will want to outbid you? It's a paradox, what I don't understand is, why would anyone bid at the lower figures, let alone any amount in which you might think the item is priced below market value?

The only way that would ever make any sense is if only previously active bidders were allowed into the auction after a certain number of bids Because there's only 1 second left on the timer and this could be your lucky break! People will waste the 40 cents for a chance to potentially pay a low price for an item they want.

We know people will do this, because it is happening. In a free market, why would a company not take advantage of that? I've never used one of these sites but I think the theory is that because it only adds on 10s, then you can get some really crazy good deals if you bid and then somehow the 10s elapses and nobody else bids.

That's why the time limit between bids shrinks, the number of new bidders is disallowed after a certain point etc. Its still nothing but pure luck gambing but even worse because the odds are probably way worse than slots machines for making money.

There are two things going on and neither really have to do with a straight auction. You are buying "bids". You bid only to "win" the auction be the last bidder.

The actual final price of the auction is arbitrary. The trick is that the auctions are very short in duration. Each time a "bid" is placed, the auction time remaining increases slightly. As long as people are bidding the auction continues. So you have two choices: You see items being won for cheap and it makes you think you can do it too. You watch the page for awhile see the flow of bids, there are some users that immediately rebid every time they are outbid, other uses wait until the last possible second, whatever.

When it looks like the bidders involved are getting tired of bidding, maybe several different people are placing last second bids, then maybe there's a chance that when you place your bid everyone else will assume that someone else is going to rebid. I looked at the flow and thought that time was the right time to start bidding. This seems pretty ingenious. I mean, they can just run a bot that forces bidding to continue until they've made more than the cost of the item on Amazon, close the bidding, then buy the item off amazon and ship it to you?

I can't tell if that's really a scam or if it's just a really smart way to provide a crowdfunding service to people. I've tried a penny auction site, and won bids. It gets quite addicting, and if you're grandmother is currently addicted to HSN or QVC, then a penny auction site would be a quick trip to bankruptcy for her. I actually kept a spreadsheet of the money I put into bids vs.

But it's really easy to lose money on those sites and not realize it. Basically it looks like this boils down to a lottery. You have to buy "tickets" and the more tickets you buy the better chance you have of winning the item.

That's when their bot steps in. It probably keeps bidding on the item until they hit their profit threshold. If it doesn't sell, they've made profit on all of those bids AND they get to keep the item because the bot won. If it hits that profit threshold, then the user gets a cheap item, but the company gets all the money for those bids. The cost of the item is spread out over dozens of people.

One person made out well, but 20 others got screwed. It's an ingenious scam. I think a raffle is almost a better word for it. You get people at the rodeo to pay for tickets and the bass boat paid for itself, now anything else you sell is profit to the raffle. So it "makes sense" to buy up to tickets, if it's going to all but guarantee you win the boat.

I suspect such an "AMA" will be about as trustworthy as those "winner" stock photos. I don't see why they wouldn't send the item they're making a killing on every item regardless of what it actually sells for they have plenty of room to acquire more auction items.

Oh I'm sure they send out the actual items on the off-chance that a live user actually wins. They'd still come out far ahead buying the item at retail and selling it at the "discounted" winning price, because they have sold all of those bids. Probably no different than the lottery and gambling. The difference is that they found a loophole that doesn't classify them as gambling however the general premise stays the same of "for entertainment only, no guarantee of winning, player beware etc.

Betting on Games of Skill isn't legal in most places either Skill or Chance isn't the factor here.. Sorry if i confused you. The "winning" user only made two bids which each cost 40 cents on average. That's ok, this is just too bizarre, and I can't figure out what the deal is. How did the price get bid up so high in this case?

Is it a mistake? Some kind of proxy, like another site that says "the winner of this bid is actually submitting a bribe"? Remember, each bid raises the ending price by 1 cent.

At that point, bids have been placed for 40c, and you've broke even. If there's not enough interest in the auction to generate bids, the house can have a bot that always just outbids the current highest bidder until either the house wins the item back, or the requisite price has been reached.

Either way, the house makes money. That's because those aren't really just bids but a ticket to win the prize which is the auction item. Everyone who bid still pays the amount they bid no matter if they win the item or not. You are paying for a chance to win.

There is a pretty similar experiment: And if Beezid operates from a territory that doesn't recognize those fraud laws or gambling laws? That's how the sketchy online poker shit is run. Plant the servers in a nation that doesn't give a single fuck about gambling and you're done. Or illegal streaming services like MovieBox. They just host from servers in a nation with lax copyright laws. MPAA can't really do shit about that, except beg ISPs to block domains, and they can just come up with a new domain every 5 minutes.

I don't buy it. It has to be company bot or someone with a lot of free bids. And this just kind of site doesn't have the allure of gambling, you cant get you money back or hit the jackpot, you get a tablet, or a phone, this is fraud. Not trying to be negative on the article or your work, its very interesting and well done, I think you spotted something very fishy.

That's possibly why someone would continue to bid even though they have paid way over the odds already. I've seen gamblers do some truly ridiculous shit when it comes to money. The article assumes that all bids cost the same or that the company may be fraudulently bidding to extend time on the auction.

Having researched these sites before, there is another auction. These sites will have an auction where the item being sold is a pack of bids.

Winning bid auctions isn't quite as exciting and people with the strategy of buying bids cheaper are probably keeping better track of their spending. Still its a losing proposition given the example from the article. This is the strategy used by the penny auction sites to keep bidding going without placing fraudulent bids, they just flood the market with discount bids which keep retailer bidders going and going.

Yeah, my guess is that the four big bidders are actually Beezid in some form and they only make a profit on all the little red bidders on the chart less the cost of the iPad.

The big 4 bidders are probably real bidders that had previously won an auction for more bids. These people that have won bid packs bid with them like they are free money and serve the purpose of making sure auctions go for a long time driving up the number of retail priced bids which they make money on.

I think they would have been exposed before now if they were straight up cheating. Just throwing this out there: Those 4 big spenders account for 17, of the 18, total bids on the item. I suspect you are pretty spot on that they are company-run bots, I just can't see 4 big outliers like that and not suspect something. That seems like a lot of clicks for a couple humans. I call foul here, this is bot behavior. Well, the article said "Users can, for example, use automatic bidding bots" which I assume just bid back and forth until someone reaches their max bid.

The same is also a feature of eBay. You don't need to click, the site provides you with a bid agent which is a bot that will automatically enter a bid for you until the price reaches a certain amount.

The less interaction the site requires from a user, the easier it is, the more likely someone is to spend lose money. That's the first thing I thought of. Sunk cost fallacy be damned. I've been in this tread too long and I now have an irrational hatred for the tablet. I still think you're underestimating the capacity of some people to be very irrational. I can see someone thinking "but if I just throw one more 40 cent bid at it and win, I will lose less money than if I don't I don't think he is, because of the ratio of the dollar amounts we are talking about here.

A typical sunk cost fallacy example can have someone losing a lot of money, but lead by the dream of winning MUCH larger amounts. Unless the auction chosen by OP was a one-in-a-million example You know how many comments you've made? I don't but my point is it's a lot and you probably wouldn't believe how many it was if we tallied it up.

This is how it happens. You can repeat your belief that people aren't stupid not sure why you think so highly of people but that doesn't mean it's not entirely possible and probably likely some 85 year old woman is out there buying bids in group packs and then bidding recklessly for a tablet for to send the Nigerian prince that just needs a cheap tablet so he can Skype with his love, her.

People fall for stupid garbage every day. People donate to charities that do nothing but pay their CEO a fortune and people give crack addicts "money for the bus". People buy lottery tickets in hopes of getting struck by lightning x. Sure all of this can be justified as gambling or naive philanthropy but do you really put it past these same people to connect the two things and realize they're spending too much in every case?

It very well could be a bot, and it should be look into if this occurs on many or all of their high end auctions. But there is another possibility. A lot of these bid sites, including Beezid sell bids.

So although you buy bids, you can also bid on a bid pack. So let's say buying a bid costs 40 cents. Yea that and apparently they offer a 'guaranteed win' on your first bid pack so if you buy a bid pack and lose, they just keep replenishing your bid pack until you win.

They also have a 'buy it now' options so if you lose you can reclaim all of your bids if you buy the product at retail price. The whole site is ingenious really. The deeper I dug the more complicated it became. There are like 20 different types of auctions to start with, each with different rules and that is only one page of many on how the site works. So they're overloading the users with options so that they can later pretend that using the site is a skill so is therefore not subject to the gambling laws.

I know somebody who did run such a site a few years ago, and discussed this and other things in detail at the time:. Yes, some people are spending crazy amounts, but, most likely, some users stuffed their free bids they got sometimes scratch-cards, winning bids on bid-packages, free-bids-every-X-hours things etc , and spent them all on that single item they wanted.

No, they did not run a bot, didn't need to at all The diehards spend so much money, and someone is always online to bid on the new shiny gadget. Not that other sites won't do bots, but, they sure didn't while the business was shady as hell due to the "gambling or not" discussion. From a similar article I read years ago about similar Penny Auction sites, the terms and conditions limit bidders to winning no more than 2 items per day.

Yet despite this, some of the frequent bidders would outbid others multiple times. Also these same bidders would do the same thing day after day after day. Are you able to run that analysis to see if this is still the case? Achieving this level of profit might take a few auction cycles, as Items "won" by the bots would then go back in the cue to be "sold" again.

The analyzer determined that the only items you could bid on that would give you a profit were Gift Cards to WalMart. Frankly, I don't think it is credible to believe that Arsenic, Rubidium, Oxygen, and Iodine are all real people. Maybe one is, but this sort of loss level is not sustainable by anyone long term. May as well bid that extra 80c to at least get the tablet. You are probably right in this case.

I don't know much about penny auctions other than what I just read in that article. But, never under-estimate people's inclination to throw good money after bad. Can confirm, I really have to hold myself back when buying things on eBay. The numbers stop meaning anything once you start trying to get an item.

The way to win eBay is to use a site that will insert a final bid at the end of the auction. You set the maximum price; if the bidding hasn't got there, the bid will be as low as possible. It means you don't get into a bidding war, since you already "lock in" the highest price you're willing to pay.

And nobody else knows you're interested in the item, since you don't bid until five seconds before the end. Also you don't have to sit and watch the auction; if the auction ends in the middle of the night, the bot is still awake to press the button for you.

So let's say the winner of the bid was a bot. Meaning, multiple bots continued to bid hundreds of thousands more times in total without any human interaction? What is the benefit in that? I'm not even intending to argue against, as I posted earlier I don't know crap about penny auctions. The twist though was the second place person also had to pay, and they got nothing. The desire to not lose money is strong, and it keeps these auctions going long after they stop being profitable.

This is a very popular exercise to teach sunk cost fallacy. Apparently it was a weekend executive conference where two bidders refused to blink first. I could because they have so many different 'options' for auctions and 'guarantees' and such. For instance they offer a 'Buy It Now' option which lets you reclaim all of your bids if you agree to buy it at full retail price.

There is a 'guaranteed win' for new members so if you buy a bid pack and lose they just keep replenishing your bid pack for free until you win. There are also 'trophy auctions' which give the winning bidder back all of their bids. When swoopo first came to america and I looked into it, one of the ways they further obfuscated how much was spent was by letting people bid on buckets of bids, so you could stockpile hundreds or thousands of 'free' bids and then blow them on an item you wanted.

It's difficult for people to keep track of how much they're actually spending on these items when the true cost is buried in math, something the primary users of these sites don't fully understand. There's 4 "big spenders" and then "everyone else". If this is the case, wouldn't it be a pretty easy lawsuit? I mean, it's exactly fraud if you're telling someone they can win, when they actually have no shot if the company is the one they're budding against.

You think he just fell asleep or gave up after spending nearly 20x the product's value? No, carefully programmed bots made by shady online auction sites never fall asleep.

What this guy uncovered is not that penny auctions are a tricky way to sell items for more than they are worth. He uncovered straight up fraud. Remember, users pay each time they bid. The company can either have the bot drive up the price for a while and back out, or simply make the bot win outright. It would not surprise me to discover they're also using bots to win auctions for items that never actually existed in the first place.

Innocent people expect a certain degree of honesty and transparency, and clearly they are getting neither of these things. Hopefully some type of investigation comes out of this data. I reckon it is just a bot with credit card or some kind of fund auto renewal.

It's probably even part of the betting website. That is my guess too. These weren't people bidding, they were bots. Affiliate marketer here, they are definitely bots. I know a lot about these sites. The identity protected was that of a bot fo sho.

The bots act as an incentive for other people to bid, because they assume that someone is actually outbidding them. I can have an auction and then announce at the end that the buyer will have to pay more for the item? The bidder gave 40 cents in an attempt for their one penny increase to win.

It is most definitely fraud for the auctioneer to arbitrarily raise the price. The site can't just put in the terms and conditions 'I can do whatever I want' and expect that to protect them from fraud charges. Their TOS isn't nearly as long as I would have expected. This statment was smushed in with a lot of similar statements about not being responsible for viruses, etc, or pretty much any of their choices, actions, or behavior.

That said, they can put whatever they want in their TOS, but I still think they can be liable for fraud if they're using bots because they are inducing customers to spend more money by taking action such that the customer is no longer in a position to win without engaging in such action bidding again and they're doing so under a false and misleading pretense.

These customers in good faith believe the other bidder to be a rational person and not an algorithm designed to pull the reward another few inches from their grasp with the express purpose of inducing another bid under the guise of competition with another human being. If they admit that they specifically use shill bots to inflate auction prices then in might not be fraud because they're disclosing it as a practice so customers truly bid at their own risk, but "unauthenticity of the information contained" as a disclosure is void for its vagueness.

All that said, I'm only really familiar with the fundamentals of fraud in the US, and beezid is a Quebecois company. Keep in mind from the bidder's perspective, the money has already gone. Some of these sites had pretty heavy promotions to begin with, it's possible they found themselves heavily invested - maybe they felt like they "just" missed out on a product but could win if they needed more, and just ended up trying to cut their losses by seriously committing to winning something.

It's possible this is fraud, but I think the predatory business model is good enough at exploiting people's natural biases that they wouldn't need it. This type of practice is also common on eBay I presume, not bots, but actual humans. I've noticed a few patterns. I pointed it out to eBay a few years back, and not long after, they started obfuscating bidder names.

Doubt it was connected, just an odd coincidence. Sort of like a shitty way of setting a reserve, but making the item look cheaper at first. And bidding in obscene increments? I had one item get relisted 3 times listed 4 times total. The third time I won dude must have forgotten to bid it up at the last minute to try and raise my bid for a fair price, and then he cancelled the transaction saying he lost the item, and immediately relisted it this is was drove me to research the bid history and contact them.

It's stories like this that convinced me to stop using eBay. A friend of mine listed a pair of shoes on eBay and mailed them to the winner. The winner then said that my friend sent him the wrong shoes. My friend was only selling one pair of shoes, he knew he was lying.

But what could he do? To make eBay happy he asked the guy to send the shoes back. The dude ended up mailing back his old busted shoes. I now use Craigslist exclusively, and only accept cash. Yes, my market is smaller, but I can't compete with China's prices anyway.

As a seller on ebay, I can confirm that ebay is shit for sellers. I sold an item to someone, mailed it, and a couple weeks later the customer asked for a refund claiming they never recieved it.

I sent the tracking number which showed the item was delivered, but that was not good enough for ebay. They said I should have taken pictures of myself mailing the package Wtf? Not only that, but a few weeks later the buyer listed the exact same item on his own selling page, using the exact pictures that I took with my camera, and ebay still would not budge!

To top it all off, ebay does not allow you to leave negative feedback for buyers anymore, only positive. What a load of bullshit. Not only that, but a few weeks later the buyer listed the exact same item on his own selling page.

Well, all I use it for is Buy-it-now auctions for stuff from china that is much less than it costs anywhere else.

Something has got to be off with the postal service because half of the shit never makes it here, but paypal refunds it so whatever Just fuck you, fuck you, fuck you for knowingly supporting millions of cases of fraud. Fuck you for being a hypocrite. Fuck you for being a fence who supports cheaters and smilingly takes his cut.

My brother and dad are sellers on ebay and they do this every time. They put zero effort in hiding it, even using accounts registered to the same address. In what other industry would that be ok? We fixed the problem. Now people can't see which accounts are bidding! Years ago, I had a long bout with insomnia and would spend hours and hours on eBay just looking. I never bought stuff, was just fascinated by the process of what were clearly shill bidders. It was, like your example, the same user names buying and selling.

I still think it was a way to launder money. Who needs a sandwich shop or bakery when you can have an auction legitimize your deposits? This was back when they didn't only take PayPal and you could send a money order or meet and do cash. So it doesn't matter to them.

But as was pointed out, these sites are pretty much gambling sites. I've seen a gambler blow through thousands for the rush of winning. It could very well be a slot machine junky as well. A gambler spends thousands in an effort to win thousands more than they started with. Every bid adds ten seconds onto the auction duration.

I just can't see someone clicking 7, times into a web page over the course of a day bid. That would be ludicrous. Even if he split those up between days and stayed up 14 hours a day, that's around clicks per hour.

Please feel free to correct whatever mistakes I've made in math or if I've misunderstood the process. If this is right or close, I just think this almost becomes an endurance issue more than a "would they walk away" issue. The goal is to be the person who set the last bid when time finally runs out.

Because so many people are new to the process of penny auctions, there are allegations of these sites being a big scam. The truth is, there are elements of strategy as well as an element of luck involved in getting these items for so little money.

Because Quibids is sensitive to being called a scam, and they want people to take them and their website seriously. To help bring people into the website to see what they are really doing, Quibids offer multiple ways for you obtain Quibids free bids.

The Quibids free bids are used to help people feel better about the money they are spending up front and to enter the site. This is smart, because, with a good strategy, people will be able to go in and buy some products for just pennies on the dollar. Even when you add in the fees for the bids, the amount paid for the items is just a fraction of what would have been paid if bought in the store.

It can ultimately be a really good deal. Before you go into a penny auction site like Quibids, make sure you understand that these auctions are a lot like a cross between strategy and luck. The luck is hard to control, but the strategy part is not, and that is the most important part. The first thing to consider is the best time of day to place your bids.

The more people there are placing bids, the harder it is to get the product for a really low price. You want to place bids during the day on Tuesdays through Wednesdays, because those are the times people are least likely to be on the website. Quibids tries to be fair to everyone, so they reduce the number of items available for bidding during these slower times, but it is still a better opportunity for you to place your bids and to even win some Quibids free bids for a lower price. Also, you will want to look at how often to bid, and when to bid once you have chosen an item you want to try and win for yourself.

Thinking about your strategy and researching other methods are two ways you can take advantage of Quibids and everything they have to offer. Your best bet is to win on QuiBids more often is to use a QuiBids tracking software like the one offered here on Bid-Ninja. Quibids is a company that wants a piece of the bidding website pie.

Honesty is evident all over the Quibids website. If you read their blog, you cam learn how their site works, and then you will understand the initial charges, and how all the fees and other charges work.

They tell you up front that you are going to be paying for bids, and how many you will be getting as a result of signing up and buying those bids, known as a bid pack. You are not just suckered into the deal if you read what they put right in front of you. Another thing they are very serious about is keeping their customers and their financial information safe.

Some of the steps they take to protect people are as follows: They have thought ahead and figured out the obvious game people will play, and they do not allow multiple accounts from the same person or household, nor is using bots allowed. There are consequences for breaking those rules. You will not be able to get the product you bid on after 12 wins in 28 days, and there will be no refunds.

Make sure you are aware of these rules, though. You are responsible for your account and for anyone that uses it. This is big for a lot of people, and they are serious about not selling your information. Stolen or fake cards are reported to the proper authorities, and they are willing to prosecute anyone that attempts to use fraud on their sites. Quibids is a humungous penny auction Website; it is larger than any other penny auction Website on the planet.

Quibids is a big deal. There is no doubt that the bargain hunters out there — and the risk takers — have been electronically lining up to try to win the products they covet at a Quibid auction. There are compelling reasons to take Quibids out for a spin and see if they are for you.

Read on for some answers to questions that might be formulating in your brain as you read this sentence. A new bidder, one who has just signed up at the Quibids Website, must buy a beginning package of bids, which means spending 60 dollars for bids. Once you have shrugged off your newbie cape, you still have to buy bids in bulk; 40 bids will cost you 24 dollars, bids will cost you dollars and so on. The more bids you buy, the cheaper each individual bid is. Quibid products are new and will arrive at your door in the original packaging and with all relevant warranties, should you win an auction.

Their official Website notes that their products are overstock surpluses, wholesale stock, stock from warehouses that are closing down and the like.

The Quibid auctions do not disappoint when it comes to speed; except for special offers, they take just five minutes. Yes, that is five minutes of frantic bidding and the highest bidder at the exact moment when the auction closes takes home the prize. Some bidders are not satisfied with their manual dexterity and they use what are called Bid-O-Matic tools. These tools automatically place bids on behalf of their users.

You can start up again if the bidder suddenly slows down, she may have run out of bids. Quibids allows you to buy that Amazon Kindle Fire or those Oakley Batwolf sunglasses the retail price less the money you spend on your losing bids. This is an enticing offer, especially if you were going to buy the product whether you won it in an auction or not, as you can recoup some of your losses.

As this article is being written, there are several products being featured on the Quibid Website showing such savings. The Better Business Bureau gives the folks at Quibids a solid rating, which they would not do if there were unresolved customer complaints stacking up against the firm.

Quibids likely works hard to keep this rating, as without it new customers would no doubt be more skeptical of their operation and commitments.

There are penny auctions at Quibid, meaning that it costs you a penny to place a bid; though there are other auctions that cost 5, 10, or 20 cents per bid: It seems that you do have to sign up at the Quibid Website to check out which auctions are true penny auctions and which are not.

You will find that not all Quibid users are happy about their experiences at the penny auction Website, though you will find that some users cannot contain their pleasure. What is the real deal? You have to experience Quibids to determine whether it is for you, and before doing this, it will be useful to put on your research hat and learn more about this way of auctioning coveted products.

There are several blogs and consumer Websites that cover the action over at Quibids, take some time to read what they have to say. If you have some money to spare, and you like a bargain, and you like the excitement of bidding at an auction, of not knowing whether you will win the prize you so want but being thrilled at the prospect you might, Quibids may be for you. The trick is not to throw money at Quibids auctions in a haphazard way but to choose you battles, go after only what you really want and do all that you can to get it.

Are you a fan of online auctions? Have you ever wanted to sell your unwanted items in an easy way to make a little extra cash? No matter what the motivation is, online auctions have a distinct advantage in this area.

You can watch auctions or bid immediately, making it easy to buy or sell your favorite products in an instant. One of the most popular online auction sites is Quibids. Using QuiBids as your auction site, you can check bids in real time to see what catches your interest.

The QuiBids model is simple: This continues until the maximum bid reaches zero seconds on the timer, and the item is awarded to the top bidder. With such an exciting interface and fast-paced approach, you may be surprised to year that there is talk of QuiBids.

However, there are many benefits to using an online auction site like QuiBids. Part of the reason that people are apt to think that the QuiBids scam is real is that their auctions work differently than auctions do on sites like eBay.

Because QuiBids strives to bring that real auction feel to online bidding, some features of the site may seem a little off at first glance. First of all, before you start bidding, you must sign up. Then you must purchase bids. You also have the option to buy out the item that is up for auction, similar to other online auction sites.

The difference with QuiBids. You will never, ever have to pay more than retail price for any of the products listed on the QuiBids site. However, you must note that not everyone will win the auction at a huge discount. Sometimes, you just get the product for a few dollars under retail — but even then, you still save a few dollars! Many people find it odd that QuiBids charges money before you can begin bidding, which leads them to think that QuiBids is a scam. However, this is only because the site needs a placeholder for the funds.

The seller will be furious that they waited for their item to sell for nothing and will have to relist it; the site loses money hosting an auction that will never be paid for; and you lose out on getting your item if someone else wins and never pays.

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You are buying "bids". You bid only to "win" the auction be the last bidder. The actual final price of the auction is arbitrary. The trick is that the auctions are very short in duration.

Each time a "bid" is placed, the auction time remaining increases slightly. As long as people are bidding the auction continues. So you have two choices: You see items being won for cheap and it makes you think you can do it too. You watch the page for awhile see the flow of bids, there are some users that immediately rebid every time they are outbid, other uses wait until the last possible second, whatever.

When it looks like the bidders involved are getting tired of bidding, maybe several different people are placing last second bids, then maybe there's a chance that when you place your bid everyone else will assume that someone else is going to rebid. I looked at the flow and thought that time was the right time to start bidding.

This seems pretty ingenious. I mean, they can just run a bot that forces bidding to continue until they've made more than the cost of the item on Amazon, close the bidding, then buy the item off amazon and ship it to you? I can't tell if that's really a scam or if it's just a really smart way to provide a crowdfunding service to people.

I've tried a penny auction site, and won bids. It gets quite addicting, and if you're grandmother is currently addicted to HSN or QVC, then a penny auction site would be a quick trip to bankruptcy for her.

I actually kept a spreadsheet of the money I put into bids vs. But it's really easy to lose money on those sites and not realize it. Basically it looks like this boils down to a lottery. You have to buy "tickets" and the more tickets you buy the better chance you have of winning the item. That's when their bot steps in. It probably keeps bidding on the item until they hit their profit threshold. If it doesn't sell, they've made profit on all of those bids AND they get to keep the item because the bot won.

If it hits that profit threshold, then the user gets a cheap item, but the company gets all the money for those bids. The cost of the item is spread out over dozens of people. One person made out well, but 20 others got screwed. It's an ingenious scam. I think a raffle is almost a better word for it.

You get people at the rodeo to pay for tickets and the bass boat paid for itself, now anything else you sell is profit to the raffle.

So it "makes sense" to buy up to tickets, if it's going to all but guarantee you win the boat. I suspect such an "AMA" will be about as trustworthy as those "winner" stock photos. I don't see why they wouldn't send the item they're making a killing on every item regardless of what it actually sells for they have plenty of room to acquire more auction items.

Oh I'm sure they send out the actual items on the off-chance that a live user actually wins. They'd still come out far ahead buying the item at retail and selling it at the "discounted" winning price, because they have sold all of those bids. Probably no different than the lottery and gambling. The difference is that they found a loophole that doesn't classify them as gambling however the general premise stays the same of "for entertainment only, no guarantee of winning, player beware etc.

Betting on Games of Skill isn't legal in most places either Skill or Chance isn't the factor here.. Sorry if i confused you.

The "winning" user only made two bids which each cost 40 cents on average. That's ok, this is just too bizarre, and I can't figure out what the deal is. How did the price get bid up so high in this case? Is it a mistake? Some kind of proxy, like another site that says "the winner of this bid is actually submitting a bribe"?

Remember, each bid raises the ending price by 1 cent. At that point, bids have been placed for 40c, and you've broke even. If there's not enough interest in the auction to generate bids, the house can have a bot that always just outbids the current highest bidder until either the house wins the item back, or the requisite price has been reached.

Either way, the house makes money. That's because those aren't really just bids but a ticket to win the prize which is the auction item. Everyone who bid still pays the amount they bid no matter if they win the item or not. You are paying for a chance to win. There is a pretty similar experiment: And if Beezid operates from a territory that doesn't recognize those fraud laws or gambling laws?

That's how the sketchy online poker shit is run. Plant the servers in a nation that doesn't give a single fuck about gambling and you're done.

Or illegal streaming services like MovieBox. They just host from servers in a nation with lax copyright laws. MPAA can't really do shit about that, except beg ISPs to block domains, and they can just come up with a new domain every 5 minutes. I don't buy it. It has to be company bot or someone with a lot of free bids.

And this just kind of site doesn't have the allure of gambling, you cant get you money back or hit the jackpot, you get a tablet, or a phone, this is fraud. Not trying to be negative on the article or your work, its very interesting and well done, I think you spotted something very fishy. That's possibly why someone would continue to bid even though they have paid way over the odds already.

I've seen gamblers do some truly ridiculous shit when it comes to money. The article assumes that all bids cost the same or that the company may be fraudulently bidding to extend time on the auction. Having researched these sites before, there is another auction. These sites will have an auction where the item being sold is a pack of bids. Winning bid auctions isn't quite as exciting and people with the strategy of buying bids cheaper are probably keeping better track of their spending.

Still its a losing proposition given the example from the article. This is the strategy used by the penny auction sites to keep bidding going without placing fraudulent bids, they just flood the market with discount bids which keep retailer bidders going and going.

Yeah, my guess is that the four big bidders are actually Beezid in some form and they only make a profit on all the little red bidders on the chart less the cost of the iPad. The big 4 bidders are probably real bidders that had previously won an auction for more bids.

These people that have won bid packs bid with them like they are free money and serve the purpose of making sure auctions go for a long time driving up the number of retail priced bids which they make money on. I think they would have been exposed before now if they were straight up cheating.

Just throwing this out there: Those 4 big spenders account for 17, of the 18, total bids on the item. I suspect you are pretty spot on that they are company-run bots, I just can't see 4 big outliers like that and not suspect something. That seems like a lot of clicks for a couple humans. I call foul here, this is bot behavior.

Well, the article said "Users can, for example, use automatic bidding bots" which I assume just bid back and forth until someone reaches their max bid. The same is also a feature of eBay. You don't need to click, the site provides you with a bid agent which is a bot that will automatically enter a bid for you until the price reaches a certain amount.

The less interaction the site requires from a user, the easier it is, the more likely someone is to spend lose money. That's the first thing I thought of. Sunk cost fallacy be damned. I've been in this tread too long and I now have an irrational hatred for the tablet. I still think you're underestimating the capacity of some people to be very irrational. I can see someone thinking "but if I just throw one more 40 cent bid at it and win, I will lose less money than if I don't I don't think he is, because of the ratio of the dollar amounts we are talking about here.

A typical sunk cost fallacy example can have someone losing a lot of money, but lead by the dream of winning MUCH larger amounts. Unless the auction chosen by OP was a one-in-a-million example You know how many comments you've made?

I don't but my point is it's a lot and you probably wouldn't believe how many it was if we tallied it up. This is how it happens. You can repeat your belief that people aren't stupid not sure why you think so highly of people but that doesn't mean it's not entirely possible and probably likely some 85 year old woman is out there buying bids in group packs and then bidding recklessly for a tablet for to send the Nigerian prince that just needs a cheap tablet so he can Skype with his love, her.

People fall for stupid garbage every day. People donate to charities that do nothing but pay their CEO a fortune and people give crack addicts "money for the bus". People buy lottery tickets in hopes of getting struck by lightning x. Sure all of this can be justified as gambling or naive philanthropy but do you really put it past these same people to connect the two things and realize they're spending too much in every case?

It very well could be a bot, and it should be look into if this occurs on many or all of their high end auctions. But there is another possibility. A lot of these bid sites, including Beezid sell bids.

So although you buy bids, you can also bid on a bid pack. So let's say buying a bid costs 40 cents. Yea that and apparently they offer a 'guaranteed win' on your first bid pack so if you buy a bid pack and lose, they just keep replenishing your bid pack until you win. They also have a 'buy it now' options so if you lose you can reclaim all of your bids if you buy the product at retail price. The whole site is ingenious really. The deeper I dug the more complicated it became. There are like 20 different types of auctions to start with, each with different rules and that is only one page of many on how the site works.

So they're overloading the users with options so that they can later pretend that using the site is a skill so is therefore not subject to the gambling laws. I know somebody who did run such a site a few years ago, and discussed this and other things in detail at the time:. Yes, some people are spending crazy amounts, but, most likely, some users stuffed their free bids they got sometimes scratch-cards, winning bids on bid-packages, free-bids-every-X-hours things etc , and spent them all on that single item they wanted.

No, they did not run a bot, didn't need to at all The diehards spend so much money, and someone is always online to bid on the new shiny gadget. Not that other sites won't do bots, but, they sure didn't while the business was shady as hell due to the "gambling or not" discussion.

From a similar article I read years ago about similar Penny Auction sites, the terms and conditions limit bidders to winning no more than 2 items per day. Yet despite this, some of the frequent bidders would outbid others multiple times. Also these same bidders would do the same thing day after day after day. Are you able to run that analysis to see if this is still the case? Achieving this level of profit might take a few auction cycles, as Items "won" by the bots would then go back in the cue to be "sold" again.

The analyzer determined that the only items you could bid on that would give you a profit were Gift Cards to WalMart.

Frankly, I don't think it is credible to believe that Arsenic, Rubidium, Oxygen, and Iodine are all real people. Maybe one is, but this sort of loss level is not sustainable by anyone long term.

May as well bid that extra 80c to at least get the tablet. You are probably right in this case. I don't know much about penny auctions other than what I just read in that article. But, never under-estimate people's inclination to throw good money after bad. Can confirm, I really have to hold myself back when buying things on eBay. The numbers stop meaning anything once you start trying to get an item. The way to win eBay is to use a site that will insert a final bid at the end of the auction.

You set the maximum price; if the bidding hasn't got there, the bid will be as low as possible. It means you don't get into a bidding war, since you already "lock in" the highest price you're willing to pay.

And nobody else knows you're interested in the item, since you don't bid until five seconds before the end. Also you don't have to sit and watch the auction; if the auction ends in the middle of the night, the bot is still awake to press the button for you. So let's say the winner of the bid was a bot. Meaning, multiple bots continued to bid hundreds of thousands more times in total without any human interaction? What is the benefit in that? I'm not even intending to argue against, as I posted earlier I don't know crap about penny auctions.

The twist though was the second place person also had to pay, and they got nothing. The desire to not lose money is strong, and it keeps these auctions going long after they stop being profitable.

This is a very popular exercise to teach sunk cost fallacy. Apparently it was a weekend executive conference where two bidders refused to blink first. I could because they have so many different 'options' for auctions and 'guarantees' and such.

For instance they offer a 'Buy It Now' option which lets you reclaim all of your bids if you agree to buy it at full retail price.

There is a 'guaranteed win' for new members so if you buy a bid pack and lose they just keep replenishing your bid pack for free until you win. There are also 'trophy auctions' which give the winning bidder back all of their bids. When swoopo first came to america and I looked into it, one of the ways they further obfuscated how much was spent was by letting people bid on buckets of bids, so you could stockpile hundreds or thousands of 'free' bids and then blow them on an item you wanted.

It's difficult for people to keep track of how much they're actually spending on these items when the true cost is buried in math, something the primary users of these sites don't fully understand. There's 4 "big spenders" and then "everyone else". If this is the case, wouldn't it be a pretty easy lawsuit? I mean, it's exactly fraud if you're telling someone they can win, when they actually have no shot if the company is the one they're budding against.

You think he just fell asleep or gave up after spending nearly 20x the product's value? No, carefully programmed bots made by shady online auction sites never fall asleep. What this guy uncovered is not that penny auctions are a tricky way to sell items for more than they are worth.

He uncovered straight up fraud. Remember, users pay each time they bid. The company can either have the bot drive up the price for a while and back out, or simply make the bot win outright. It would not surprise me to discover they're also using bots to win auctions for items that never actually existed in the first place.

Innocent people expect a certain degree of honesty and transparency, and clearly they are getting neither of these things. Hopefully some type of investigation comes out of this data. I reckon it is just a bot with credit card or some kind of fund auto renewal. It's probably even part of the betting website. That is my guess too. These weren't people bidding, they were bots. Affiliate marketer here, they are definitely bots. I know a lot about these sites. The identity protected was that of a bot fo sho.

The bots act as an incentive for other people to bid, because they assume that someone is actually outbidding them. I can have an auction and then announce at the end that the buyer will have to pay more for the item? The bidder gave 40 cents in an attempt for their one penny increase to win. It is most definitely fraud for the auctioneer to arbitrarily raise the price. The site can't just put in the terms and conditions 'I can do whatever I want' and expect that to protect them from fraud charges.

Their TOS isn't nearly as long as I would have expected. This statment was smushed in with a lot of similar statements about not being responsible for viruses, etc, or pretty much any of their choices, actions, or behavior.

That said, they can put whatever they want in their TOS, but I still think they can be liable for fraud if they're using bots because they are inducing customers to spend more money by taking action such that the customer is no longer in a position to win without engaging in such action bidding again and they're doing so under a false and misleading pretense.

These customers in good faith believe the other bidder to be a rational person and not an algorithm designed to pull the reward another few inches from their grasp with the express purpose of inducing another bid under the guise of competition with another human being.

If they admit that they specifically use shill bots to inflate auction prices then in might not be fraud because they're disclosing it as a practice so customers truly bid at their own risk, but "unauthenticity of the information contained" as a disclosure is void for its vagueness. All that said, I'm only really familiar with the fundamentals of fraud in the US, and beezid is a Quebecois company. Keep in mind from the bidder's perspective, the money has already gone.

Some of these sites had pretty heavy promotions to begin with, it's possible they found themselves heavily invested - maybe they felt like they "just" missed out on a product but could win if they needed more, and just ended up trying to cut their losses by seriously committing to winning something.

It's possible this is fraud, but I think the predatory business model is good enough at exploiting people's natural biases that they wouldn't need it. This type of practice is also common on eBay I presume, not bots, but actual humans.

I've noticed a few patterns. I pointed it out to eBay a few years back, and not long after, they started obfuscating bidder names. Doubt it was connected, just an odd coincidence. Sort of like a shitty way of setting a reserve, but making the item look cheaper at first.

And bidding in obscene increments? I had one item get relisted 3 times listed 4 times total. The third time I won dude must have forgotten to bid it up at the last minute to try and raise my bid for a fair price, and then he cancelled the transaction saying he lost the item, and immediately relisted it this is was drove me to research the bid history and contact them.

It's stories like this that convinced me to stop using eBay. A friend of mine listed a pair of shoes on eBay and mailed them to the winner. The winner then said that my friend sent him the wrong shoes. My friend was only selling one pair of shoes, he knew he was lying. But what could he do? To make eBay happy he asked the guy to send the shoes back. The dude ended up mailing back his old busted shoes. I now use Craigslist exclusively, and only accept cash. Yes, my market is smaller, but I can't compete with China's prices anyway.

As a seller on ebay, I can confirm that ebay is shit for sellers. I sold an item to someone, mailed it, and a couple weeks later the customer asked for a refund claiming they never recieved it. I sent the tracking number which showed the item was delivered, but that was not good enough for ebay. They said I should have taken pictures of myself mailing the package Wtf? Not only that, but a few weeks later the buyer listed the exact same item on his own selling page, using the exact pictures that I took with my camera, and ebay still would not budge!

To top it all off, ebay does not allow you to leave negative feedback for buyers anymore, only positive. What a load of bullshit.

Not only that, but a few weeks later the buyer listed the exact same item on his own selling page. Well, all I use it for is Buy-it-now auctions for stuff from china that is much less than it costs anywhere else. Something has got to be off with the postal service because half of the shit never makes it here, but paypal refunds it so whatever Just fuck you, fuck you, fuck you for knowingly supporting millions of cases of fraud.

Fuck you for being a hypocrite. Fuck you for being a fence who supports cheaters and smilingly takes his cut. My brother and dad are sellers on ebay and they do this every time. They put zero effort in hiding it, even using accounts registered to the same address. In what other industry would that be ok?

We fixed the problem. Now people can't see which accounts are bidding! Years ago, I had a long bout with insomnia and would spend hours and hours on eBay just looking. I never bought stuff, was just fascinated by the process of what were clearly shill bidders. It was, like your example, the same user names buying and selling. I still think it was a way to launder money. Who needs a sandwich shop or bakery when you can have an auction legitimize your deposits? This was back when they didn't only take PayPal and you could send a money order or meet and do cash.

So it doesn't matter to them. But as was pointed out, these sites are pretty much gambling sites. I've seen a gambler blow through thousands for the rush of winning. It could very well be a slot machine junky as well. A gambler spends thousands in an effort to win thousands more than they started with. Every bid adds ten seconds onto the auction duration.

I just can't see someone clicking 7, times into a web page over the course of a day bid. That would be ludicrous. Even if he split those up between days and stayed up 14 hours a day, that's around clicks per hour.

Please feel free to correct whatever mistakes I've made in math or if I've misunderstood the process. If this is right or close, I just think this almost becomes an endurance issue more than a "would they walk away" issue.

This had to be some kind of bot even if it's just the owner of the item trying to bid up his own auction in the dumbest way imaginable. Chances are the other 3 largest bidders were bots as well.. That's enough for me to never click a beezid auction.

I'm not sure sunk cost fallacy applies here. If I lose now, it's all a waste. But if I win now I kind of agree And after all, you've sunk so much into this auction, surely your chances of being the final bidder have increased. It's not true, but that kind of reasoning is possible.

Just like with normal gambling, they feel like they are due for a win. The site also apparently hides that sort of information from people. It even gives them all sorts of tools to try to game the system.

This guy likely would not have been fully aware of how much he had already spent. That or someone's personal bidding bot going to town on the auction with a bad set of rules built in. And if you're an addict, you spend too much and now you're in the hole and you're just trying to win back whatever you can to justify the money you've already spent.

You're not spending pennies. That's a lottttt of opportunities to walk away and that's why I think this is a bot with shady purpose and not a person with a problem.

I just can't picture any addict wanting a used tablet so badly they click 40 cents down 7, times after you've already spent more than the retail value of a brand new tablet. It's either someone who simply didn't understand that the 1 cent bid had a 40 cent surcharge attached or the website's really doing something screwy.

The scale of this is simply ridiculous. Even someone with a bad problem should realize when they've spent twice the product's value with no real chance of winning. Oh I meant spending pennies at the slots. I was talking in more general terms as to how a gambling addict may lose sight of how much money they've spent and justify to themselves how the end will justify the means. I agree that it's likely a bot, but there's always a chance.

I have friends who make mobile games and they have told me stories of whales that spend tens of thousands of dollars in gambling games on their phone to win fake money that is worth nothing. That makes even less sense than this. Ya this makes no sense to me I used to use the site quibids. I actually did 'fairly' well there, because I was selective on what I bid on, but more importantly, you were unable to spend more money than the item cost.

The way they got around this was was that you could also Bid on Bids - they had bids on the site people could try to 'win', think of it as a gift card. However, those bids which were aquired via an auction, and not paid for by a credit card, do not 'count' on your own personal limit. Another fine example http: Wow, thank you so much for posting this.

I've always wondered about these sites. Or some sad soul who left it on auto bid. Either way, this is very eye opening. What a shady business. You think that same guy bid on 15 different items. Not saying the company is legit but if you read the article they noted that the company also sold configurable bots. Some people may believe that they have a winning strategy.

Believe it or not, those aren't company owned bots bidding. Those are actual people. If the auction company were using bots it would be shill bidding which in most jurisdictions is regulated under auction laws or as fraud.

I can tell you this with certainty. What they do is hold "contests" or free giveaways where certain people can win millions of free bids. Maybe those individuals run their own bots, but it really doesn't matter. I then found another great deal for a 55" tv on Craigslist, again I emailed the Craigslist poster and I got the identical reply Stating they just sold it but I can get it on quick-bids. So that's when I realized I'm dealing with a company that is crooked.

After my Craigslist experience with them and the reviews that I have read here, I'm very happy I didn't open an acct there. And I feel sorry for those of you that got ripped off. I would imagine you can't win the auctions and I would assume you're bidding against software. I'd say the odds of getting a good deal on their site are slim to none. I just wanted to share my experience. Thankful I didn't get scammed.

Perhaps this company was once legit but they certainly aren't anymore. Hopefully this site gets shut down. When I signed up for this service, they requested my credit card information before I could bid.

I contacted customer support and they did a refund. Beware of this company, they are not being totally honest. I am sorry so many of you lost money. For those of you that have lost money on your credit cards, dispute the charge with the issuer of your card. Visa and MasterCard are good about getting your money back for you in arbitration. You don't have to live with fraudulent merchants like this and if you want to see they go out of business, this the quickest way. If their credit card processor won't do business with them anymore, how are they going to stay in business?

If very many people ask for a reversal in charges because the company misrepresents itself then they will cancel their contract. This is a HUGE scam!! It's impossible to win anything because you have 6 or 7 other "bidders" I believe the other bidders are computer generated artificial intelligence bidding on the same auction thus, returning the auction clock back to 10 seconds. This can continue for a extremely long time, as it did in my case, 45 minutes in 10 second increments. This is a game.

A game of gamble like slots in a casino. Your chances of winning is slim to none. Don't fall for this like I did. Sincerely, Sucker in South Carolina. I think in the beginning it was okay. I was winning and when I didn't win I would switch over to buying gift cards so they actually got a lot of money for me.

But the worst thing ever is two of the prizes that I did win and one of them I paid full price for the other one. I want a pretty good deal. They both came broken and by the time I open them and try them out it was too late. Was nothing I could do. I was in the middle of moving and they just didn't care. What's up with that??? I tried to use the Quibids system to find deals. I found that it requires a great deal of time and loss of many bids each costing money to wind up with nothing if you don't have time and a large stash of bids which costs money.

After a year of inactivity, I realized I still had an account. I asked them to end my account and refund my money left on the account.

I was told it had been too long and I could only have the bids and no refund. I believe this constitutes theft! Regardless of how long it's been, I should still get whatever cash is represented by my number of bids.

Don't use this company! They will find some way to steal your money! So I just went to make a user name and all that on Quibids. I had no idea.

I've never even dealt with a website like this before that just charges your account without even letting you know. What a total SCAM!!! Tried to buy from items from Craigslist. I sent out numerous emails, a lot of people said they sold the item but shared that they bought it off Quibids.

Signed up with Quibids. Nowhere did they say they would charge my credit card. When tried to call numerous times they are "out of the office".

This is a scam. Don't even try it. I lost money and you will too! They don't tell you that they are going to be charging your credit card as much as they do. It's impossible to win anything when you try and bid. The customer service is complete jerks too. I don't actually think the bidders on the site are real people.

Like everyone else, I found the site. While not dishonest, Quibids isn't there to help you out either. Never was able to win again. Quibids keeps people on their site by emailing a few free bids once a month or more. Okay no more Quibids for me. If it sounds too good to be true By the way Quibids has a BBB accredited business logo on their home page bottom right corner.

Unfortunately they are not accredited by the BBB. This company is a fraud!!! Please don't waste your time and money! You will never win auction because I believe it's a spam!

They run several auctions simultaneous but not always the same items because as bidders view the choices, it changes the picture and description of the active auction. The different items shown in the auction screen vary in price.

It is one auction per item, but when you win, you have a selection of about products for the equal price as the actual item you won. You can choose which item you want and pay the ending price for the auction.

There are no hidden or sneaky attempts to "steal" your money or "commit fraud". I don't like their policy about "locking" bids for this particular reason. As long as you bid one time in minutes based on auction value , the auction remains open to you.

And that does allow for jumpers. Their automatic bid BidOMatic is limited to 25 bids and you must constantly monitor it. Get distracted for few minutes and the item is gone! Yes it is a money-making machine for the people who own it and they have plenty of suckers like me that just keep on purchasing the bids and losing money. So I was looking for a phone and I email this person and they to me try Quibids.

I was like "Oh okay, sure, why not?? It took 60 dollars from me, the money I was saving to get a new phone. Then I email them and this is what it said:. In order to get this handled for you quickly, make sure you only send us one email for this issue.

Sending multiple emails for the same issue could significantly slow down our response time. If you are contacting us concerning a shipping issue, please be aware these can take up to five business days for a response. If you are requesting a return of an item within the 30 day return period, please keep the original packaging, as it is essential to the return process.

Our support staff is available through live chat and email seven days a week, offering phone support Monday through Thursday from 9 am - 5 pm CDT and Friday 9 am - 4 pm CDT. Give me money back. I didn't say you can take it from me. Ugh, it makes me so mad. They say you need to spend some time learning how Quibids works.

Now I know; they just take your money. I joined Quibids even after being a little skeptical but I did read their terms and conditions where it mentioned. I gave my credit card info thinking that if I won a bid it would be an easy checkout. It is almost impossible to win bids on this site. This site is a scam. This website needs shutdown.

Your use of this site constitutes acceptance of the Terms of Use. Advertisements on this site are placed and controlled by outside advertising networks.

See the FAQ for more information. The information on this Web site is general in nature and is not intended as a substitute for competent legal advice. The contents of this site may not be republished, reprinted, rewritten or recirculated without written permission. Looking for a deal website? We'll match you with the right company that knows what you need. Home Shopping Deal Websites. Are you this business? Learn more about ConsumerAffairs for Brands. Select stars to rate your experience.

Recent Oldest Most helpful. Get expert advice delivered right to your inbox. Thank you, you have successfully subscribed to our newsletter! Enjoy reading our tips and recommendations. Erik of Sandy, UT. July 7, I'm not sure if everyone is seeing a different promotional sign-up page than myself but it's pretty clearly stated that you'll be charged in order to begin placing bids. How do I know I can trust these reviews about QuiBids?

We require contact information to ensure our reviewers are real. We use intelligent software that helps us maintain the integrity of reviews.

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By Buy Now price, this is the most impressive auction win on this list. Three Voucher Bids QuiBids savings: Auctions for the ever-popular Beats By Dre headphones are pretty common, but less common is to see a pair go for just 10 Real Bids!

Six Real Bids QuiBids savings: A big, loud subwoofer pumping some mean jams. Just one watch and two awesome bands to go with it! Four Voucher Bids QuiBids savings: Very nice auction win. Two Voucher Bids QuiBids savings: An awesome auction win, especially if you prefer your golfing without real golf balls, grass, or the outdoors. You then start using your purchased bids to try and get another Bid Pack. If you happen to win it, great—but there's more work to be done.

Once you win this Bid Pack voucher, it doesn't automatically apply to your account. You need to "claim your prize"—which is odd, because it's not a prize, right? A prize is something you get for nothing, not something you purchase.

Anyways, to claim your "prize", you need to pay the amount you actually won the Bid Pack for, which could be anything. Remember, the amount of bids you made have already been deducted from your Bids Account, so you've already spent money to win the auction.

So, if took you 20 bids to win a 25 Bid Pack, then it seems like you are up 5 bids. Quite a deal, huh? And this is just the beginning, which is meant to get you comfortable in the bidding process. I don't know about you, but I'm not comfortable yet. Something to be warned about—if you're one of those many users who did not know they had to claim the "prize", then you might just lose it. You have a week to claim the auction you've won, and if you don't, everything you spent will be forfeited and you're officially screwed.

In the video, they use a Nintendo Wii as an example of an actual not beginner auction. You can see the bid price, the time remaining and the bidding history. For new auctions, the price starts at zero. Each time a user makes a bid, the price for the auction goes up by 1, 2, 5, 10 or 20 cents, which is predetermined by QuiBids. Each time a user bids on the item, the clock gets reset, with a maximum of 20 seconds, so other users have a chance to bid.

Quote from the video: This increment is always shown at the top left of the product image. If there isn't one, it will automatically go up in 5-cent increments. Now, as you can see in the video, there's a 2 cent bid appearing in the top left of the product image, which in fact is allowed.

I'd say this immediately shows the unprofessionalism of QuiBids—someone I would not trust my money with. But I may be reading too much into this. If you're currently the highest bidder, and no one else bids by the time the clock reaches zero, then you've just won the auction. In actuality, if you're committed to winning the auction, but there's also at least two others committed, you've got yourself a pretty good bidding war.

This is the only part of the video that seems to be legitimate. You pay all the above costs with your credit card and fill out your shipping information. If you really wanted to purchase the product, but lost the auction, then you have one chance left—Buy It Now.

If you lose, you can opt to buy the product anyway, for the full retail value minus the cost of bids you've already placed. Let's use the video's Wii example again. Or a way to make the final purchase price lesser and more enticing? But don't forget about shipping costs! Something they don't tell you about in the video nor explicitly state on their site is that it only credits bids purchased fully with credit cards.

In the QuiBids blog , they try to make users aware that they should use the Buy It Now, so as not to waste their money. It is a fun and risk-free way to do your holiday shopping.

This is an unrealistic expectation that certain customers have. We encourage everyone to set a realistic expectation of how much time and financial investment is necessary to win a big ticket item. If the above information didn't turn you off, then maybe you'll listen to others and save your money. Many users end up winning nothing but debt, calling it a scam.

Some believe it's a pyramid scheme. Others believe it's rigged.

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The way they are set up also allows for a high level of strategic game play. I debate with myself which is the most competitive, SkoreIt or Beezid.

SkoreIt is my favorite site to bid on, mostly because they are one of the few penny auction sites with gold and silver, which I love bidding on. They also are the only site with an interactive history, profile and auto-bidding options that really take the game play to the next level. Check out more why I like SkoreIt auction site.

I tried them first because they are one of the other few auction sites that have precious metals. While the bidding interface is kind of boring, the deals are awesome!

The catch is the price jumps up like thirty cents a bid instead of the normal one cent. Still, it is a great way to learn the ropes and see how it works. QuiBids — These guys are the big boys on the block. They have a ton of auctions every day from the very cheap and easy to win items to the high end stuff. They auction off all kinds of things including trips to New York, gas scooters, Dyson Vacuums and a whole lot more. This lets you apply any value of spent bids towards purchasing the item directly from the site.

This lowers your risk. Penny auctions are a relatively new type of auction that has evolved on the internet over the past couple of years. Plus, poker players have a built in edge! This is not at all like ebay. You may have seen the commercials in TV from the big penny auction sites. The penny auction sites advertise incredible deals on items. You can win money and you can lose money. Yes, you can really score great deals in penny auctions. This is not to say it is easy or that everyone can do it but it is possible.

And poker players have a built in edge over the average player. The big catch to penny auctions are that bids cost money. And you have to purchase bids just to participate in the auction. You have to pay just to bid. If you do not win the auction you still lose money.

You can win money, but you can lose money. The penny auction sites use a bidding fee auction business model [ source ] where they focus on selling bids, not on selling products. So, the long story short is you can win incredible deals but you can also lose money. There is a level of risk involved. When I first found a penny auction it looked too good to be true. I quickly learned that the price of the auction has very little to do with the cost of the item.

Many of the negative penny auction reviews you will see around the internet are from people who did not take the time to research exactly what a penny auction site is and how it all works.

Inevitably the naive bidder does not win the auction, loses money and cries foul. That is how most of the negative penny bidding reviews come to light.

The long answer is that it is a strategic game that involves elements similar to poker. Psychology, intimidation, strategic game play, maneuvering and other tactics come in to play at the best bidding sites.

You try to convince the competition that they may as well not bid because you are just going to keep on bidding no matter what. You want them to stop bidding, they want you to stop bidding and lets see who is going to win. I'm going to keep my eye on it and just see how things happen but hats off to them for it, they would be making a killing. It has a red rating from WOT http: Cahill has done it again writes I couldnt have said that better: As I said in the OP — there is no way they are getting my money.

I dont think it is a "scam" in the true sense of the word. The victims of a scam dont know they are being ripped off till it is too late, the participants on planetbid know and accept it — this is the part that makes me want to manufacture helicopter ejector seats and waterproof teabags -clearly there will always be some fool to buy them.

Following investigation of your complaint, the ACMA is satisfied that the interactive gambling content the subject of your complaint is hosted outside Australia, and that the content is prohibited content as defined in the Interactive Gambling Act the Act. In accordance with the code, the ACMA has notified the above content to the makers of approved filters listed in the code, for their attention and appropriate action. On this occasion the ACMA has also referred the matter to the appropriate law enforcement agency.

Further information about the co-regulatory scheme for interactive gambling, including a copy of the Act, can be found at http: I think there should be controls over what can hold a. I was assured I would receive my item within 14 days of purchase.

That was on the 19th November. It is now the 21st of December. They assure me it will be sent by christmas — that leaves 2 days , but are currently have "supplier" issues. Does that mean they are auctioning items they dont actually have yet? Is this site real or just a bogus front for money launders who dont deliver anything? Have others received their goods? Have I fallen for an internet scam? Am I funding someones tax free lifestyle on the beach somewhere?

Indeed it seems that all comments have stopped just now when more people are getting on the bidding bandwagon in planetbid. I had heard a lot about Planetbid and applied the addage anything that sounds too good to be true usually is! I decided to spend a few dollars and see if I could prove to myself it is a scam, and I have enough evidence to convince me it IS a scam.

Now I am not saying they don't sell anything, I suspect they do sell the odd item so there are some people who will always say it is genuine, but I am certain they don't sell anything like the site would suggest, this is why I think so.

I got myself a few hundred bids and started bidding for a Nikon D Kit, I strategically picked my bid start and after a while it was just me and one other, this went on for about half an hour with no other bids except mine and the one other bidder, such that clearly if I were to stop the other bidder would get the camera As soon as I stopped all of a sudden two or three other bidders appeared, that is too much of a coincidence for me, the system clearly has fake bidders that watch and insert bid where they need to, to push the price up.

Planet bid may well "sell" a few items, I don't know, but you'd be damn lucky. So planet bid you are welcome to my few dollars if it stops your fraudulent activity from catching others I can't wait to hear PB's response to this post!

Please pass the word. I have just laid a complaint to the ACCC about them. Their site advertises that you can purchase any of the items for retail minus the money you spent on bids if you are unsuccessful but when I tried this they said it wasn't available.

ACCC have just come back and said that yes, it is illegal conduct, and they have logged it in their database. If they get more complaints about PlanetBid they will then investigate them. So if you have had any grief with planetbid it could pay to go to http: Interestingly 'Steve' from Planetbid emailed me to say their server isn't in Australia and their company is based in Hong Kong so they don't need to abide to Australian law Unfortunately for them their domain name is registered in Australia, using a trademark that was purchased using the address:.

So if ACCC find them at significant fault I'm sure they'd have the power to revoke their trademark and have their domain name canceled Do you have to stay online to bid. Or do you put in a maximum amount then it will bid automatically. Is there any proof anywhere that people that have won items have them now in their possession? Also paid very cheaply for it? Someone won a Nintendo Wii for 22 cents. Bulls really must have tits. Is anyone saying this is real.

This goes beyond skeptical to me. Well I'm a bit embarrassed to say this but: I had a go at this action and lost hundreds of dollars. It was quite bizarre. So I purchased some bids and started bidding: To put this in perspective: I had bids on one item.

Great for the owner of the Auction, but not so great for the many bidders that lost hundreds of dollars I found out the hard way. This is not a good way to gamble your money and it is gambling. If there are such bidders they will help in jacking up the price to the point of either: With the help of the internet such bidders are almost certain to be untraceable, so there is not much one can do. And there is a slim chance that sites would admit to doing this.

And I found the technical term for this form of scam. It's called Shilling and is illegal in most countries. Clearly the site is being manipulated by the operators so that they almost always "win" the auction and so never have to buy the goods. They may occasionally allow a real person to win an auction so that they can point to them for publicity but in most cases the results are rigged. Obviously there is a lot more to check than just that as they can be easily fudged but it is a start.

It,s a scam,a fool and his money are soon parted,steer clear of this oh so obvious money making con Never use auto bid or this web site. It was just two of us remaining so at around 3am so I toped up my account with bids as I was down close to bid remaining then all of a sudden random bidders just started bidding.

I wiill now start to film and document the site its very sus. Its like there is a computer bidding, not real people. I have been studying the sale price of the mac lap tops for 16 weeks and that is why I put so much money on it. I should have won, after my money is gone never again I will make every effort to put as much on the Net about this site, I will up load film of the bidding on U tube.

You need to sit and have a long look at how the bids are placed and who and ask yourself why would somone bid only once or twice on something they wanted and why would so many different names pop up between bidding!!!

Monday, 15 August 1: Thank you You'll never know who will bid and how. Sorry for the loss. Thank you, we have our business address: Please take advantage of our special Bid Package Offer for today: Planet Bid [ info planetbid. Planet Bid — Contact Form Submitted. Dear Planet Bid The contact form has been submitted at your website. Here are the detail Enquiry: It was just two of us remaining so at around 3am so I toped up my account with bids as I was down close to bid remaining then all of a sudden all theses random bidders just started bidding.

I have been studying the sale price of the mac lap tops for 16 weeks and that is why I put so much money on it I should have won after my money is gone never again I will make every effort to put as much on the Net about this site, I will up load film of the bidding on U tube. I can also find a long list of complaints on the net It will catch up to u soon. I set up 3 planet bid accounts on 2 laptops. I tried deliberatly bidding against myself.

Often I was the only person bidding for while. So I stopped bidding. Just when the auction should have ended a random bidder started. I wanted to be sure. I did this a number of times on differant auctions. Every time when I was the only one bidding and I stopped a random bidder appeared exactly when the auction should have ended. I have a screen shot of this. As soon as I stopped all of a sudden two or three other bidders appeared, that is too much of a coincidence for me, Did anyone notice that user 'planetbid' didn't deny having fake accounts.

They just explained that they had to provide "receipts and shipment information". If you hold all the information on autobids it would be very easy to bridge the gaps of real bids with a few fake bids.

Then ultimately a real bidder could get the product. I have a screen shot showing my bid at A differance of 17 seconds. How is that possible when the auction was on 15 second intervals? I contacted planetbid about this twice, but haven't received a response. Replace the hours you would have spent watching the auction, with hours spent working a job. Combine this income with the money you would have spent bidding and you should nearly have enough to buy the item.

You will certainly have more than I and many others have, which is nothing. I've just wasted 15 minutes looking at this site, specifically at an auction about to end. For 12 minutes every time the auction counter got to 3 seconds left, a new bidder came on and clock reset to 15 seconds.

So regardless of anything else said, the site organisers can just keep accepting auto bids for as long as they choose. It is a scam. It is based in Hong Kong. See shipping and delivery link and it says page "Not Found".

They have no intention of shipping anything. I bid bids on an auction and someone else won it it didn't exceed my limit and only 65 bids were gone so I think it is suspect tell everyone you know not to go there you just do you ;money cold. I have never been scammed before and this will be the last. Their Buy Now" offer is very misleading. Interestingly when I email Steve about this issue, I'd stated that they needed to include "subject to conditions" in point 4.

Guess what they did change the "Buy Now" and included "subject to conditions" although a few weeks after they removed the "subject to conditions". The inclusion of "subject to conditions" must have reduced the number of people that were falling for the scam, thus removing this Of course the costs would need to be considered.

Archive View Return to standard view. Anyone else think this is dodgy? I bet they have their own farm of bidders to increase the bids. I like how you can bid on prepaid bids i. D although i do recall reading somewhere that these are illegal, so it may pay to do some research first I can't see the scam Surely a 'real' bidder isn't necessarily the one that 'wins' the item.

I'm surprised the bidders are foolish enough. Same scam as those bidding TV commercials. What's to stop the site owner winning every auction, particularly if they convieniently extend the auction time There is nothing to suggest that.

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