Pokies Meaning Condescending Meaning

Per se, therell be games of penny pokies and internet-based slots that truly financial impact a person not simply a cent.

Jack stellon you suppose Meaning Meaning Pokies Condescending

The team at the Online Pokies Club have painstakingly recorded in game video footage of every single online pokie that is reviewed at the site. There was a blip in 2000, but maybe that's because either S Club 7 or Thora Hird weren't available on the Fruit Machines Pokie Heroes Of Newerth so they had to push back to the Thursday instead.

Now that you have your keywords, you need to pick a blog name or a domain name.

  • Condescending definition: If you say that someone is condescending, you are showing your disapproval of the fact | Meaning, pronunciation, translations and coinsluckyz.comg: pokies.
  • Future Pokies Meaning Communication Arts There are many ways get attention and appeal new
  • s: from poker machine, a type of fruit machine on which playing-card symbols appear. Pronunciation. pokie. /ˈpəʊki/. Word of the Day. vicariance · Find out what it means · Woty blank x Word of the Year is Arrow line graph x The year in review: 's most-viewed dictionary entry coinsluckyz.comg: condescending.
  • A list of new-to-me words or different meanings to familiar words gathered by an American living in Perth, Western Australia. It was said with such condescending vehemence that I took it to be the Australian equivalent to bullshit, that is to say, cattle droppings. pokie poker machine, such as those found in casinos.
  • It's true that the more hoosier numbers you wheel, the simpler it's to lure the successful numbers in your chosen group.
  • I need to get again to work.

There are numerous opportunities in Las Vegas for a one who needs to invest in real property. Point spreads are a way for the casinos to even out the betting on both sides of the ball.

Some web browsers will prevent you from downloading certain files, and your computers operating system may ask you if you are SURE you want to open a program you got from the internet.

The heavy duty steel construction allows this machine to punch through up to 70mil thick cards.

And along with this comes the temptation to always simply remember to are current anywhere on the net that theyre.

Hence fast cash Pokies Meaning Condescending Meaning carry very high fees of the lenders.

The bonus features on this slot are quite interesting, for they arent like anything weve seen before.

Focus on "take home" value - That is extra a operate of those demanding times than of generational differences, but members of all four generations appreciate it whenever you get to the purpose and make it sensible.

Other attractions offered as part of your tour may include a stop the breath taking Hoover dam and film shows at the national geographic center.

Bstrz afbanner scruffyduck 250x250 en

Mystery Shopping is a fun way to get stuff for free and also make money on the side. Provide markers for kids to sign their name next to their handprint.

What does condescending mean?

Drop shipping can occur when a small retailer who typically sells in small quantities to the general public receives a single large order for a product.

" Literally MILLIONS of searches are made every week as everyone struggles to find a way to convert their casual web browsing into real hard cash.

As competitors Gome, Suning Sun does not claim that the people, have been slotting allowance, but the industry s revenue in recent years constitute Suning found that Qi Cheng profits from fees collected to the vendor. Make use of them, play sensibly to play more and you will increase your chances of hitting a big one.

You will discover several problems that gamers help to make once they begin - a few of which big, some compact, although the fact of the matter is they each is likely to affect ensuring your success somewhat or another.

I'm sorry, but to me, the Bellagio fountain show is not a freebie because it doesn't have a retail value, and I have Pokies Meaning Condescending Meaning to see a fun book containing a coupon I'd want to redeem. You can get a lot of ads paying 0.

Pokies Slot Handpay Videos figure if these people continue to be as well as enjoy extra they could at the least stay the chance with successful returning what theyve forfeited together with covering their particular failures.

Whereas Toomer could have snared the game winner, pass catchers Plaxico Burress and Jeremy Shockey have been no less instrumental in the G-Man win.

You can search online using keywords online games and have fun playing at no cost to you.

Admittedly I've never had impending hunger to spur me on, but I'm honestly not sure if I could manage to figure out all the help I could get if I found my funds weren't going far enough. It is designed for professional grade use in larger applications where thousands of items are produced yearly.

Condescending Meaning Pokies Meaning

Bstrz afbanner scruffyduck 250x250 en

Dropped out Pokies Online Australian Dictionary Of National Biography may presumably embrace things

  1. Snob definition, a person who imitates, cultivates, or slavishly admires social superiors and is condescending or overbearing to others. See more.:
    OK is an English word denoting approval, acceptance, agreement, assent, or acknowledgment. "OK" is frequently used as a loanword in other languages. It has been described as the most frequently spoken or written word on the planet. As an adjective, "OK" principally means "adequate" or "acceptable" as a contrast to. A rather intense Hobart rug salesman finds himself, by means of an unimaginable electoral accident, in a position of great influence over the political welfare of an Altona redhead. The rug salesman makes it known that he wants pokies reforms, a deal is struck, and the redhead becomes Prime Minister. But there is appetite for these yesterday's men to be swept aside once Brexit is done to set the party up for generational change as it tries to define what is modern conservatism. At any rate, Cabinet ministers were openly criticising Johnson at conference for his attention-seeking and headline-hogging ways and MPs were.
  2. This is not intended to be a complete dictionary of Australian slang and terminology but I have put a few Aussie slang words, local names and terms together here Usually condescending. .. Bugger - In Australia the word bugger is not used for its traditional meaning (which I am not about to discuss here).:
    Three federal politicians promise to release the information under parliamentary privilege.
  3. :
  4. :
  5. :

Sam Brak Are Pokies Meaning Condescending Meaning with out shelling out additional capital supplements

would

Read argues that, at the time of the expression's first appearance in print, a broader fad existed in the United States of "comical misspellings" and of forming and employing acronyms, themselves based on colloquial speech patterns:. One predecessor of OK was OW, "oll wright. The general fad is speculated to have existed in spoken or informal written U. English for a decade or more before its appearance in newspapers. OK ' s original presentation as "all correct" was later varied with spellings such as "Oll Korrect" or even "Ole Kurreck".

The country-wide publicity surrounding the election appears to have been a critical event in OK ' s history, widely and suddenly popularizing it across the United States.

Read proposed an etymology of "OK" in "Old Kinderhook" in Various challenges to the etymology were presented; e. Read's etymology gained immediate acceptance, and is now offered without reservation in most dictionaries. Some believe that the Boston newspaper's reference to OK may not be the earliest. Some are attracted to the claim that it is of American-Indian origin. There is an Indian word, okeh, used as an affirmative reply to a question. Mr Read treated such doubting calmly. The folk singer Pete Seeger sang that "OK" was of Choctaw Indian origin, [18] [19] as the dictionaries of the time tended to agree.

The earliest written evidence for the Choctaw word "okeh" is provided in work by the missionaries Cyrus Byington and Alfred Wright in These missionaries ended many sentences in their translation of the Bible with the particle "okeh", meaning "it is so". Byington's Dictionary of the Choctaw Language confirms the ubiquity of the "okeh" particle, [21] and his Grammar of the Choctaw Language notes the particle -keh is an "affirmative contradistinctive", with the "distinctive" o- prefix.

Subsequent Choctaw spelling books de-emphasized the spellings lists in favor of straight prose, and they made use of the particle[,] but they too never included it in the word lists or discussed it directly. The presumption was that the use of particle "oke" or "hoke" was so common and self-evident as to preclude any need for explanation or discussion for either its Choctaw or non-Choctaw readership.

The Choctaw language was one of the languages spoken at this time in the South-Eastern United States by a tribe with significant contact with African slaves. This language was used, in particular, for communication with the slave-owning [24] [25] Cherokee an Iroquoian -family language. Arguments for a more Southern origin for the word note the tendency of English to adopt loan words in language contact situations, as well as the ubiquity of the "okeh" particle.

Similar particles exist in native language groups distinct from Iroquoian Algonquian , Cree cf. A verifiable early written attestation of the particle 'kay' is from transcription by Smyth of a North Carolina slave not wanting to be flogged by a European visiting America:.

Kay, massa, you just leave me, me sit here, great fish jump up into da canoe, here he be, massa, fine fish, massa; me den very grad; den me sit very still, until another great fish jump into de canoe; His argument was reprinted in various newspaper articles between and The West African hypothesis had not been accepted by by any etymologists, [30] [32] [33] but nevertheless has since appeared in scholarly sources published by linguists and non-linguists alike.

A large number of origins have been proposed. Some of them are thought to fall into the category of folk etymology and are proposed based merely on apparent similarity between OK and one or another phrase in a foreign language with a similar meaning and sound. Allen Walker Read identifies the earliest known use of O.

The announcement of a trip by the Anti-Bell-Ringing Society a "frolicsome group" according to Read received attention from the Boston papers. Charles Gordon Greene wrote about the event using the line that is widely regarded as the first instance of this strain of OK , complete with gloss:. The above is from the Providence Journal , the editor of which is a little too quick on the trigger, on this occasion.

We said not a word about our deputation passing "through the city" of Providence. The "Chairman of the Committee on Charity Lecture Bells," is one of the deputation, and perhaps if he should return to Boston, via Providence, he of the Journal, and his train -band, would have his "contribution box," et ceteras, o. Read gives a number of subsequent appearances in print.

Seven instances were accompanied with glosses that were variations on "all correct" such as "oll korrect" or "ole kurreck", but five appeared with no accompanying explanation, suggesting that the word was expected to be well known to readers and possibly in common colloquial use at the time.

Various claims of earlier usage have been made. For example, it was claimed that the phrase appeared in a court record from Sumner County, Tennessee , discovered in by a Tennessee historian named Albigence Waldo Putnam , in which Andrew Jackson apparently said "proved a bill of sale from Hugh McGary to Gasper Mansker, for an uncalled good, which was O.

The great lawyer who successfully argued many Indian rights claims, however, supports the Jacksonian popularization of the term based on its Choctaw origin. David Dalby see above brought up some other earlier attested usages.

One example from is the apparent notation "we arrived ok" in the hand-written diary of William Richardson going from Boston to New Orleans in , about a month after the Battle of New Orleans. After many attempts to track down this diary, Read and I at last discovered that it is owned by the grandson of the original writer, Professor L.

Through his courtesy we were able to examine this manuscript carefully, to make greatly enlarged photographs of it, and to become convinced as is Richardson that, whatever the marks in the manuscript are, they are not OK. Mencken , who originally considered it "very clear that 'o. Mencken following Read described the diary entry as a misreading of the author's self-correction, and stated it was in reality the first two letters of the words a h[andsome] before noticing the phrase had been used in the previous line and changing his mind.

Another example given by Dalby is a Jamaican planter's diary of , which records a black slave saying "Oh ki, massa, doctor no need be fright, we no want to hurt him". In all other examples of this interjection that I have found, it is simply ki once spelled kie. As here, it expresses surprise, amusement, satisfaction, mild expostulation, and the like. It has nothing like the meaning of the adjective OK, which in the earliest recorded examples means 'all right, good,' though it later acquires other meanings, but even when used as an interjection does not express surprise, expostulation, or anything similar.

Whether this word is printed as OK, Ok, ok, okay, or O. In Brazil , Mexico and Peru , as well as in other Latin American countries, the word is pronounced just as it is in English and is used very frequently.

Spanish speakers often spell the word "okey" to conform with the spelling rules of the language. It is pronounced the same way. It is pronounced just as it is in English but is very rarely seen in Arabic newspapers and formal media. It is used in Japan and Korea in a somewhat restricted sense, fairly equivalent to "all right".

In Hong Kong, movies or dramas set in modern times use the term "ok" as part of the sprinkling of English included in otherwise Cantonese dialog. In Taiwan , "OK" is frequently used in various sentences, popular among but not limited to younger generations.

In Russia , "OK" is used very frequently for any positive meaning. The word in Russian has many morphologies: In France and Belgium , "OK" is used to communicate agreement, and is generally followed by a French phrase e.

OK, d'accord , "ok, chef" or another borrowing e. In the Philippines "okay lang" is a common expression, literally meaning "just okay" or "just fine". Sometimes spelled as okey. In Malay , it is frequently used with the emphatic suffix "lah": In India , it is often used after a sentence to mean "did you get it? In Germany , "OK" is spelled as "o.

In the United States and much of Europe a related gesture is made by touching the index finger with the thumb forming a rough circle and raising of the remaining fingers. The gesture was popularized in America in as a symbol to support then Presidential candidate Martin Van Buren. OK is used to label buttons in modal dialog boxes such as error messages or print dialogs, indicating that the user must press the button to accept the contents of the dialog box and continue.

When a modal dialog box contains only one button, it is almost always labeled "OK" by convention and default , usually rendered to the screen in upper case without punctuation: OK , rather than O. The OK button can probably be traced to user interface research done for the Apple Lisa. The Forth programming language prints ok when ready to accept input from the keyboard.

The appearance of ok in inappropriate contexts is the subject of some humor. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. This is the latest accepted revision , reviewed on 19 December Several terms redirect here. For other uses, see OK disambiguation , Okay disambiguation and Okey dokey disambiguation. List of proposed etymologies of OK. This section possibly contains original research. Please improve it by verifying the claims made and adding inline citations. Statements consisting only of original research should be removed.

February Learn how and when to remove this template message. Retrieved 10 December American Dialect Society 86, Durham, N. Several government backbenchers were despairing, singling out Uber, recently banned in London - a decision backed by by the Labour mayor Sadiq Khan - as an example of where the party can present the modern case for markets in presenting consumers with choice.

But Uber's plight was not mentioned by not one of the ministers who gave keynote speeches. With Corbyn tacking so far left, the Tory party has sought to combat his success by shifting left too, fighting Labour on issues like housing, university fees and the NHS - in short - enemy territory.

With its response, the government hopes to paint itself the "balanced" option. As party chairman Patrick McLoughlin??? And there is no more pertinent symbol of a dysfunctional market than the UK's housing crisis where prices are now about eight times higher than the average wage.

In last year's address to conference, the prime minister cited the financial crisis and Brexit as evidence of the British public crying out for change and spoke of the "need to rebalance the economy In the rhetoric was far more pro-market but the policies to deal with the two issues were vintage Mayism.

On Sunday evening, May ended her birthday at Conservative Home drinks for the committee and gave a rousing speech on the need to re-prosecute the case for markets. We thought that over the last few decades we had made and won arguments about the importance of free market economies, about the importance of fiscal prudence, about the wealth creation," she said.

We won the argument last time, we're going to win those arguments again. But when put to the test May reached for state intervention and government handouts. Social housing in the UK is popular and does not carry as much stigma it might in a country like Australia. As Southwark Council recently told Fairfax Media , voters are sick of the affordable housing myth and want a revival in council homes, which were effectively halted by Thatcher. Now Thatcher's female successor wants a "new generation of council houses to help fix our broken housing market.

Earlier in the week, the Chancellor of the Exchequer Philip Hammond announced a further?? It's a bit of a muddle," observed Dave Richmond who manages housing for Hull Council. And with her pledge to allow the regulator to impose caps on energy prices, May revived a policy styled by Ed Miliband in ???.

virtually means that wargamers

Barmy as a bandicoot - Crazy. Barney - Fight or argument. Barrack for - Support a team. Bash - A wild party or a physical attack. Basket case - Crazy.

Bastard - Can be used in both a positive and negative way. Bat - Ugly woman. Also bush pig, bag etc. Usually Crazy old bat. Bathers - Swimming costume. Battery acid - Cheap cask white wine. Also plonk, horse's piss, vinegar. Battler - Someone who is always struggling hard but never seems to get anywhere in life. Like me Beak - Magistrate or a nose. Beanie - Silly looking woollen hat. Bearded clam - Female genitals. Beat around the bush - To avoid coming to the point in a conversation.

Beat the meat - To masturbate male. Beaten by a blow - To just beat someone at something. Beaut, beauty, bewdy - Excellent. Bee's knees - Similar to the ants pants.

Beer goggles - When drunk you see things as better than they are, especially members of the opposite sex. Beer gut - Fat stomach on a man. Beer o'clock - Any time it is time for a beer. Belly flop - Stomach-first dive in water. Been there done that, it hurts! Belly-up - Failure of a business. Bend the elbow - Drink alcohol. Bender - To deliberately get drunk usually over a period of several days. Better half - Spouse or partner. Better than a poke in the eye with a burnt stick - Things could be worse.

Bible-basher - Evangelical Christian. Someone who can't resist shoving their version of 'the truth' down other people's throats. Big bikkies - Lots of money.

Big note oneself - Boasting. Big smoke - Cities or big towns. Can be anywhere bigger than where you are now. Big sticks - Centre goal posts in Aussie Rules football. Bike the town - Woman with no morals who has sex with anyone. Biker - Member of a motorcycle club or gang. Billiard ball as sharp as a - Dull witted.

Billy - A container for boiling water over a campfire. Billy cart - Child's go kart. Billy-o - To go very fast. Bindy - A grass prickle.

Binge - To deliberately get drunk. Bingle - Minor car accident. Bite on to put the - Pressure someone for money. Bite your bum - Same as saying 'Shut up. Bities - Biting insects. Bitser - Mongrel dog. Bits of this, bits of that. Black stump - A mythical place that signifies the end of civilisation.

Hence the expression 'Beyond the black stump. Bleeding oath - Unqualified agreement. Blimey - Said when one is surprised. Blind Freddy - Mythical person who is used as a comparison in a given situation. Another older term is cove.

Blood's worth bottling - Refers to someone who has admirable qualities. Bloody - Known as the great Australian adjective. Used to emphasize many things. Bloody oath - Unqualified agreement. Blotto - Very drunk. Blow a fuse - To lose your temper. Blow in the bag - Breathalyser test. Similar to 'brown nose'.

Blow through - Someone who just passes through without staying long. Blow your top - To lose your temper. Blow-in - Uninvited guest. Blowie - Blow fly. Bludge - To take handouts without good reason. As in 'Long haired surfie dole bludgers. Blue - An argument or a red-headed person. Also to make a mistake. I made a big blue. Blue-nosed wowser - Some one who likes to spoil other people's fun. Blues - Lights on a police patrol vehicle. Bluey - A rolled up blanket swag. Also a blue-heeler cattle dog or a person with red hair.

Bob's your uncle - Expresses the idea that once something is done, everything will be fine. Bodgy - Poor quality or poorly done. Also dunny, kybo, crapper, thunder box To take a bog means to defecate. Bog in - Usually an invitation to start eating. Bog roll - Toilet paper. Bog standard - Basic model. A defined sub-group who lack sociability and concern for others. Bogged - Getting your vehicle stuck in deep sand or mud. Boil the billy - To boil the kettle.

Boiler - An old woman or an old hen unfit to eat. Boilover - When a favourite is beaten by an outsider. Mostly used with regard to sporting events. Bolted - Ran away. Bomb - An old clapped out car. Bonza or bonzer - Excellent. Boob - Foolish person or a mistake. Also a female breast. Boomer - Male kangaroo. Boomerang - A rubber cheque they bounce. Boondie - Hard lump of sand.

Usually used by kids for throwing at each other. Boots'n'all - To do something with gusto. Booze artist - Heavy drinker. Booze bus - Mobile breathalysing station. Booze-up - A party with more alcohol than food. Boozer - Pub, hotel or a person who drinks too much. Bore the pants off - Excessively boring. Bored shitless - Very bored. Also called a scab. Bottle shop - Liquor store.

Bottler - Expression used when something good happens, Ie. Bowerbird - Compulsive hoarder. Boys in blue - Police. Brass monkey weather - Very cold weather. As in it's cold enough to freeze the balls off a brass monkey Brass razoo - Money.

Usually said in the form of: Crack a tinnie Breaker - A person skilled in training wild horses. Breather - Take a rest. Breeze - Something easy. Brick shit house built like a - Someone who is large and usually muscular. Brick short of a load - Not very clever. Brickie - A bricklayer. Bride's nightie Up and down like a - Anything that fluctuates. Bright as a two watt globe - Not very clever. Bright spark - Clever person.

Broad in the beam - Someone with a big bum. Brown eye - Showing ones bottom pulling the cheeks apart, similar but more vulgar than mooning. Brown eyed mullet - Feces floating anywhere people swim. Brown nose - To suck up, crawl to someone. Brumby - Wild horse. Buckley's chance - No chance at all. Budgie smugglers - Man's swimming costume, usually tight fitting as in Speedos.

Buffin' the muffin - Having sex. Bugger - In Australia the word bugger is not used for its traditional meaning which I am not about to discuss here. Its meaning depends on how it is used. Bugger off - To leave or to tell someone to leave. Buggered if I know - No idea at all.

Buggerlugs - Affectionate nick name. Buggery - A mythical place that you tell someone to go to rude. Built like a brick shit house - Anything that is very big and strong. A bigger version is called a bull bar. Bull dust - A lie. Bullamakanka - Another mythical place in the middle of nowhere. Bully for you - Good for you. Can also be said sarcastically.

Bum fluff - Adolescent's first facial hair. Bummer - A big disappointment. Bun in the oven - Pregnant. Also up the duff or preggers. Bunch of fives - A clenched fist. Usually someone is 'given' a bunch of fives.

The same thing as a knuckle sandwich. Bung - Something broken or carelessly put somewhere. Bunyip - Mythical creature. Burl - To try something. Burl give it a - To take a chance, give it a go.. Burr up - To get angry. Bush - Anywhere away from town. Bush bash - Drive across country where there are no roads. Bush lawyer - Someone willing to argue the merit of their case based more on their personality than on facts.. Bush oyster - Nasal mucus, usually referred to when snorted in and swallowed yuk!

Bush pig - An ugly person. Bush quack - Bush doctor, untrained, unqualified and sometimes unreliable. Bush telegraph - The way messages travel quickly by unconventional means. Can also refer to gossip. Bush tucker - Food drawn from sources in the bush. Bush TV - campfire.

Bushed - exhausted; lost; tired. Bushfire blonde - Red headed woman. For men the name Blue or Bluey is often used. Bushie - farmer or someone that has lived in the country all their lives. Bushy tailed - Healthy and wide awake.

As in 'Bright eyed and bushy tailed. Busy as a centipede on a hotplate - Very busy. Busy as one legged bloke in an arse kicking contest - Someone who is doing nothing. Butcher's hook - Rhyming slang for 'take a look'.

By a cat's whisker - Just managed to do something. Cabbage patcher - Someone from the state of Victoria. Cack-handed - Left handed. Cackleberry - Chicken's egg. Cactus - Spoiled or ruined. As in 'Shut your cake hole! Call it a day - To finish work for the day.

Camp as a row of tents - Homosexual male. Can't take a trick - Someone who is unlucky. Cancer stick - Cigarette. Cane toad - Someone from Queensland. Captain Cook - Rhyming slang for 'take a look'. Carpet muncher - Lesbian Carry on like a pork chop - To be silly or express frustration or anger that is out of proportion to the problem.

Cat's hiss - Rhyming slang for 'take a piss'. Cat's pajamas - refers to a person who thinks they're better than others. He thinks he's the cat's pajamas. Like bee's knees etc. Cat's piss mean as - A person who is mean. Charge like a wounded bull - Ridiculously high prices. See any shop in the country to experience this. Chateau de cardboard - Cask wine. Cheap as chips - Inexpensive. Prices that used to exist in shops but are seen no more. Cheap drunk - Some one who gets drunk after only one or two drinks.

Cheapskate - Penny pincher, tight wad, money grubber, long pockets short arms, Ie. Cheerio - Fare well statement. Cheese and kisses - Rhyming slang 'missus' the wife.

Chew and spew - Cheap eating joint with poor quality food. Chew the fat - To have a long talk. Chewie - Chewing gum or bubble gum. Chiack - Make fun of but with good humour. Chickenshit - Too afraid to do anything. China plate - Rhyming slang for a 'mate'. Chinwag - To have a long talk.

Chockers, chock a block - Very full. Can refer to eating food or fitting things into something. Choof off - To leave. Chook - A chicken. May also refer to an older woman Ie. Choppers - Teeth, real or false. Chrome dome - Bald head. Chuck a sickie - Taking sick leave without being sick. A national past time. Chuck a U-ie - To do a U-Turn in a vehicle. Chuck up - Vomit. Chunderous - Something that makes you feel sick. Clanger - To make a big mistake. Usually in conversation as in; 'He really dropped a clanger.

Originates from a non-alcoholic drink that was promoted as a substitute for spirits. Clean skin - Unbranded cattle or a bottle of wine with no label. Click - A kilometre. Clobber - Clothes or also meaning to hit someone. Clucky - A woman who wants to have a baby.

Clued up - Well informed. Coathanger the - Sydney Harbour Bridge. Cock and bull story - A tall tale. Cockroach - Queensland expression for people from New South Wales.

Cocky or cockie - Farmer can also be used to describe someone who is a smart arse. A smart arse farmer would be a cocky, cockie. This can also be a cockatoo or a cockroach. Cocky's joy - Golden syrup. Codger - Old man. Codswallop - A load of nonsense. Coffin nail - Cigarette. Cold as a mother-in-law's kiss - Unwelcoming. Coldie - Cold beer. Come a cropper - Literally to fall down but also means to suffer bad luck.

Come a gutser - Have an accident. Compo - Payment made to employees who are injured while working. Conchie - Conscientious objector during a war. Cooee - A cal made in the bush when trying to attract attention. Cook the books - Falsify business accounts. Coot - Old unpleasant man. Cop - Policeman or to be on the receiving end of something unpleasant. Cop a piece of lead - To be hit by a bullet.

Cop it sweet - To accept defeat with good grace. Cop shop - Police station. Cop-u-later - Can be a farewell but can also be used as a 'sounds like' for the word copulator.

Cornstalk - Person from New South Wales. Corroboree - Aboriginal ritual dance. Cot case - Crazy person. Cotton on - Understand something. Could eat a horse and chase the rider - More than just hungry. Could kick the arse off an emu - In very good health.

Could sell boomerangs to the Aboriginals - Very persuasive person. Australian adaptation of 'could sell refrigerators to the Eskimos'.

Couldn't fight his way out of a wet paper bag - A weak person. Couldn't get a kick in a stampede - Unlucky person. Couldn't give a continental - Couldn't care less. Couldn't hit the side of a barn - Someone with poor aim. Couldn't knock the skin off a rice pudding - A weak person. Couldn't lie straight in bed - A liar. Couldn't organise a screw in a brothel - An inept person.

Couldn't run a chook raffle in a country pub - An inept person. Counter lunch - Lunch sold in a country pub. Cove - Old slang for Bloke, man etc. Cow juice - Milk. Cows come home waiting 'till the - Waiting for a long time. Cozzie - Swimming costume. Also speedos Crack a fat - To get an erection. Also crack a horn. Crack a tinnie - Open a can of beer. Crack onto someone - Romantically 'hit' on someone.

Crackerjack - A good idea. Cranky - Bad tempered. Crap - Excrement; shit. Crash hot - Excellent. Brown nose, arse licker etc. Creeping Jesus - Evangelical Christian. Same as bible basher. Crook - Can mean either feeling ill or a criminal.

Crooked as a dog's hind leg - Something out of alignment or a thief. Crow-eater - South Australian resident. Crown jewels - Male genitalia. Cruddy - Low quality item.

Crumblies - Frail old people. Crust to earn a - To work for an income. Cubby house - Children's play house.

Cultural cringe - Refers to Australians who think Australian things are not good enough compared to things from other countries.

This is thankfully less apparent today. Cuppa - A cup or mug of tea or coffee. Curly - Bald person. Curry give someone - Make things difficult for someone. Cushy - Anything easy. Dag - A practical joker or dried sheep poo stuck to the wool. Damage - The cost of something as in 'What's the damage? Someone with their 'dander up' is to be avoided. Darwin stubby - A normal stubby is a small bottle of beer.

Dead as mutton - Dead. Dead but won't lie down - Can mean persistent person but is often used when describing real dead people like Princess Dianna or Elvis who are dead but never seem to be out of the press. Dead dingo's donger as dry as a - Very dry. Dead horse trying to flog a - A hopeless cause. Dead to the world - Sleeping very soundly. Deadset - Very focused or without doubt.

Dekko - To look. Derro - Homeless person with addiction problems. Dice - To throw away. Dick head - Fool or idiot. Dicky - Poor quality. Didn't bat an eyelid - Showed no reaction or emotion. Didn't come down in the last shower - Someone who can't easily be fooled. Digger - Originally used to describe gold miners but later became a term to describe someone in the Australian Army. Digs - The place you live in.

Dilly-bag - A bag used to carry food. Dingdong - A fight or argument. Dingy - Small aluminium boat. Dinkum - Authentic Australian. Dinky di - Authentic Australian. Dip out - To withdraw. Divvy up - Separate or share out. Do a flit - Run away from something. Do a Melba - Return from retirement many times. Do a perish - Die usually in the outback. Do me a favor - Don't tell me lies or fibs. Do the dirty - To do the wrong thing to someone. Do your block - Lose your temper. Do your dash - Reach your limit especially with regard to gambling.

Dob - To inform on someone. Same old, same old stuff. No-one really wants to ask the simple key questions. Where are the missing votes to support legislation? Who are the MPs missing in action on support for pokies reform?

Where are Ms Crabbe and her colleagues in this? Sniping from the sidelines or putting some attention where it's needed if reform is to proceed? Holding to account those MPs who will not vote yes to change? No, they are all writing wearying cynical put-downs of the PM as weak, or faux sympathetic pieces about the social damage of gambling addiction and calling for someone, somewhere else to do something about it.

And the voters who support change-their views don't seem to be shifting any votes across the line in the Reps. Ms Crabbe could contribute something positive to help them, and list by name and electorate the position on pokie reform of all members of the HoR in her next Drum column on the issue.

In the old days it was called "reporting". You collected the facts, sometimes they even spoke for themselves So Australia, lay off of the leader of our Minority government. Learn to count to I'll make it easy for you,thats Gillard plus 74 other MPs. Now get of your own backsides and find the missing votes for reform. You make the fatal mistake of believing the shonky push polling figures that the majority of people want to do something about mandatory commitment of pokie useage!

They always know the true state of the game. They know that the bulk of the electorate doesn't give a toss about mandatory pre commitment of pokies as a solution to stop problem gambling! They know that enough of these little people will object to being told how much they can spend on pokies, or won't be dictated to by legislation "meant for others", and that this will impact adversely on the ALP member's chances at the real polls. So there should be no confusion with what is happening here!

Just a game of politics! And the ALP plays these games better than anyone else. Nothing useful to see here! Making use of every opportunity, just follow the money trail. You see what is really going down now? Oh yes Albo- I sure get what is going on now- you are playing politics and pointing to an evil on the oneseside while convienently forgetting the evil on the other. I do not hear one word from Tony Abbott and coalition supporters about the immorality of the party accepting donations from the tobacco industry.

Oh yes Albo- whats going on is just another lot of hypocrisy. Gillard did not go to Parliament as her own Ccaucus members such as Mike Kelly were very much against Wilkies Agreement and may have crossed the floor. Gillard has undermined positive action on this issue as well. I can't work Gillard out. The people from Altona must have their own unique take on reality. For myself as a supporter of Wilkie's reforms this has been a big let down and I sway between feeling very cynical and scathing of what has transpired but also knowing there are still possibilities for change but with much less certainty of significant reform being implemented any time soon.

Short sightedness and self interest blocks many from seeing this was a unique chance to set a precedent in this area. Eventually, with or without reforms, new generations will move with the times and technology, where what was once important to previous generations will no longer appeal. However, until this occurs it is still very important for reform, not least for the reason that we should be very vigilant to not allow a situation to grow out of control as has been the case with the poker machines where you have an entrenchment of far too many reliant on money, of which, a significant proportion very often leaves others in dire straits.

Going over all that's happened and I could be very wrong about this. Although Harry Jenkins the speaker who stood down late last year and gave Julia Gillard an extra vote had previously indicated his move away from this position anyway. Prior to Peter Slipper coming on board, Jenkins made an out of the ordinary speech about his concerns over the damage caused by poker machines. Regardless of whether or not he truly held this belief, it does make me wonder now whether this was actually staged with the aim to soften the impending blow and help reassure that all was well, when patently it was not.

Nothing wrong with a Rug Salesman that elevates himself as paladins of decency and honesty. It is different if a Rug Salesman that sells Rugs made by Slave Children somewhere in India or other countries to lecture us about morality, honesty etc. Such a person would be an hypocrite. It is Tony Abbott fault that events have turned the way they have.

It is is fault that all the Union Tugs turned politicians cannot be trusted anymore. Abbot fault with is contagious negativity that the prime minister herself is turning negative on gambling reform. Maybe the rug seller should have given the Red Head the correct measurements, but like most rug salesmen he wanted the numbers to come to him. Then again maybe the Red head should have done his work for him. So the rug salesman should have provided the rug and come up with the payment too.

Some deal that would be. No, Gillard agreed to make it happen, that was her end of the agreement, her promise to Wilkie. But, we all know only too well, Gillard's word is not worth the piece of carbon it's written on. I am a redhead as are some members of my family. This may sound harsh and insulting, but that is how us redheads feel when they read comments such as this.

I am talking about Andrew Wilkie. He may not be as polished and smart-assey as some, but he is fairly new at the game and seems a decent honest sort of bloke. The whole article is condescending and quite frankly, I just wish we had more journalists with more knowledge and moral fibre than the lot we appear to have sometimes in these blogs. I am a redhead. I was born in Australia, so were 6 generations of my ancestors. To refer to Gillard as a "redhead", "ranga" etc is as tedious as it gets.

Since redheadism is quite common in this country, there is a self loathing involved, and also cognitive dissonance: I even saw a redheaded rednech abuse the PM as a "ranga"??? No doubt you also feel the same way about the derogatory use of "budgie smugglers"in relation to Tony Abbott. That swim wear is synonymous with the Life Saving movement and people denigrate all life savers when they use it as a term of derision against Tony Abbott who is also a life saver.

You tag a male by the kind of work he once did, even although he had other kinds of work. You tag a female by the colour of hair, even although she is a lawyer.

Talk about going off on a tangent. Mr Wilkie took on the occupation voluntarily and Ms Gillard took on the hair colour voluntarily I believe - grey is much more likely after a couple of years as PM.

It doesn't seem that the writer is describing their former occupation or hair colour as defining the total sum of their achievements in life with her shorthand. The betrayals keep piling up. First Kevin, then the rest of us over carbon, now Andrew Wilkie.

Another welcome chuckleworthy piece Annabel. It's been 2 weeks since your last article - I was starting to wonder if you'd gone on another sabbatical.

The ABC must be be a very indulgent employer! This story of the niave rug salesman and the red head is good, but perhaps the rug salesman should have considered the fable of the frog and the scorpion. In this fable a scorpion asks a frog to help him get across a river, the frog is hesitant because he believes the scorpion will sting and kill him, but is finally convinced because the scorpion points out that killing the frog would also doom the scorpion.

When crossing the river the scorpion does indeed sting the frog dooming them both. Wilkie was very niave in the first place. The many faces of Julia make her impossible to trust so it was not surprising when she went back on her word.

I think it's unfortunate that Tony Abbott doesn't seem much better. I was hoping by now the Libs would have seen that Tony hasn't got what it takes and allow an intelligent person have his position. Jen you and Not Me; really appear to be as naive as Wilkie, or perhaps Wilkie was not naive, but actually understands the realities of politics. But that does not excuse you for following the mantra of Tony Abbott and the Liberal Party. It should be obvious to anyone that Labour had to make deals that they hoped they could keep, and they would in some cases have to beat their heads against a brick wall, but would try anyway.

The message the opposition hammers away at incessantly is that Gillard is duplicitous, and even a liar. This is not true. Abbott comes under little scrutiny, bust just think of the party his critics will have if ever he becomes PM. You may then wish that you had been more circumspect in your criticism. I am just waiting for him to start wriggling out of his stupid paid maternity leave proposal.

He states that he never suggested that it be removed but they were talking about the tent embassy, and the did use the term "move on. What scares me is that some are starting to emulate our politicians. What kind of country would this be if, we all followed the examples set by our inglorious and ignoble leaders? I think the Hobart rug salesman is a realist; fully aware that his political customer base leans more toward the Altona redhead than the Northern beaches wingnut. Where in the leadership manual does it say if the political composition or operating circumstances of the parliament changes you don't revise policy even if it means you lose the ability to successfully legislate or remain viable?

I wish journalists would scrutinise and not critcise. Lay out the facts and let people judge for themselves instead of trying to persuade people in a certain way of thinking Calling people a redhead or a wingnut is unrespectful comming from a journalist about our leaders, like them or loath them! Julia Gillard had committed to reform on Poker Machines by instigating an enquiry from the Productivity Commission She did have an agreement with Andrew Wilkie and outlined was a deadline and the consquences if the deal fell through The deal did fall through because Julia Gillard has stated they did not have the numbers and Andrew knew that as he tried to canvass suport for his proposal Andrew Wilkie can feel very let down no doubt, he did his best, but to blame Julia Gillard is not fair neither What journalists should be asking and doing research on, if what she said is true and what is the story behind it all, without fear or favour To readers who keep insisting she lied about the Carbon Tax get your facts straight It is not a Carbon Tax but a Price on Carbon with an ETS, two different meanings, therefore there is no lie, end of story!

Having lived in the Middle East, I must say that characterising Andrew Wilkie as a "rug salesman" is rather condescending even if it does add a bit of colour to the article.

Andrew Wilkie is to me much more a True Believer than he is a rug salesman. And Andrew is not alone. To me, all the so-called independents are True Believers as they are the ones who have had the guts to shed themselves of the bondage of party politics and peddling of mediocrity that entails. The pokies issue is a blatant example of much that is wrong with the political management of this country.

Some one like Wilkie can be criticised for being too naive, too honest, too honourable by those endeavouring to mitigate the short comings in character of the county's Prime Minister. Who, by all accounts is too cunning, too deceitful and too willing to forego what's good for the nation and it's people for purely political gain short term gain at that.

Gillard has ensured that those numbers are not there. Her big mistake is that she has played Wilkie for a fool and assumes that the electorate is fool enough not to see through it.

I look forward to seeing the back of Gillard, although I would be even more enthusiastic if the options were more palatable. Still, on principle, the Australian people should always be prepared to remove from office those who prove a lack of integrity. Until such time as the message gets through, that integrity is essential if you want to continue to lead our country. The Labor party is not going to win the next election. It's about time the PM realised this and stopped trying to be a popular leader and started being a good leader.

She has one chance to introduce positive reforms, she has done some good things but this pokie business looks very bad. Jane sees clearly, as usual. Gillard will not have another chance as leader, so why is she blowing this, her only opportunity?

Annabel, I know you are trying a bit of lit hearted relief to our current overheated political debate, but I think you may be just showing your level of boredom with it all. Whether you think it, or not, the issue of pokies and gambling in this country is something we should all be concerned about. And problem gamblers of all persuasions are not only a problem for themselves or even their families, but a problem for this country as a whole.

In saying that, I can not agree with Wilkie's response to Gillards response to the obvious. In its current policy form the government did not have the numbers and did not look like ever getting the numbers. In politics one of the first lessons that anybody should learn, politician or voter, is that you rarely get what you want. After all politics is called the art of compromise.

And Wilkie does not appear to understand that basic lesson, although as far as I can see from the current political debate in this country very few people seem to understand that basic fact. Too much basic common sense for many readers here. One wonders when we will be able to start talking about some liberal policies. The trouble is no one seems to care.

Abbott is having a free run. How many of his supporters come out and support his direct action waste of money, or he paid maternity leave tax on the mining companies he said would go out of business with a minerals resource tax. What fun it is going to be if Abbott ever gets to be PM.

Those nervous Labor members in marginal seats may be in for an unpleasant suprise come the next election. By failing to take this measure to the Parliament, where Wilkie's ability to gain the numbers could be tested, Gillard has simply reinforced the public perception that she stands for nothing. Those members may be spared the mud slinging of Clubs Australia leading up to the election only to be swept away in the much greater disillusionment with the current leadership.

This is great piece that shames the tribe of "Deathwish Indulgents"who continually pump out the " Newspoll On My Shoulder " dirges that now pass for political comment and opinion in this country. Thankyou so much , it was a relief and a rare pleasure to read it. The Malaysia solution was a sure failure yet Gillard introduced it to the parliament. Why not try this legislation? Peter, you just don't get it.

Labor has 72 voters, the PM needs Oakshott, Windsor, Katter and Crooke will not vote for Wilkie's bill. It is political reality the PM deals with to govern. Julia Gillard signed a written agreement and has now broken it.

The government gained a benefit from the agreement Wilkiie's vote but as soon they don't need that they've reneged on their commitment to legislate without even attempting to put that to the parliament.

The Australian electorate recognise betrayal and lies when they see them. OK, so thats my opinion, but we'll see if I'm right at the next election. I am not going to comment on the substance of this article rather the disrespect shown to Ms Gillard and Mr Wilkie. To have a headline with the words redhead and carpet salesman appalled me.

The Media in general has to take some repsonsibility for the lack of respect shown to our politicians. These two people are two decent, ordinary Australians who deserve more respect than this. What authority does the federal government have to legislate on this issue anyway.

All other gambling laws are state-based - why should there be an exception for this? Surely this law would be unconstitutional? If people want to see reform on pokies then it should be handled at the state level. We don't need laws pushed through for the entire nation on one man's whim. We should be moving towards de-centralisation of government, not the opposite. LukeT Some states can't look after their finances correctly,Luke, the GST revenue returned to WA is far less than given to the Eastern states and WA does not have pokies falling out of clubs or pubs, but we still have to carry on and finance infrastructure in a much larger state than the pokies states.

We probably save much more on Psychologists and Govt. I am utterly sick of big business that promote this insipid gambling culture to those people who are weak minded and fall for the bells and whistles that pokies provide. And yes, if we need federal intervention to stop these rogue states from robbing people then let the big Policeman loose on them. The problem that exists is he is a real rug salesman but she isnt a real red head.

As a rug salesman he was never good because the silly bugger was too honest, with her no one was ever sure what her true colour was. The next move is up to Andrew Wilkie. Wait and see what happens when Parliament resumes. It could be interesting for us all and a defining moment for Andrew Wilkie.

Otherwise it will be just another long year of nauseous politics that we seem to be subjected too to take us closer to an even more nauseous election campaign. Really Annabel - there are only three problem gamblers in Australia. Until the Premiers are weaned off the proceeds of this human misery, any notion of bet limits and pre-commitment schemes is just tampering at the edges the politicians will feel that nice warm inner glow, but nothing much else will change.

Crabbe, when is the so called professional media going to stop this silly, childish reporting. The PM is governing this country after negotiating government with the the cross bench. Would the PM govern differently in her own right, I'd say yes.

The PM must deal with the numbers to pass bills, so your article is silly dribble. You would be much better holding Abbott to account, he has been dog whistling to certain sections of voters for ages.

He knew preciously that he was dog whistling with his comments yesterday. Thankfully we have a calm, articulate lady as PM, which I hope will be the case for years to come. So she keep her promises then would she? The PM negotiated her agreement with Andrew Wilkie in the full knowledge that she didn't have a majority, yet still undertook to legislate a "full pre-commitment scheme". A promise she has now broken, but not before having the benefit of Wilkie's vote up to now.

It's a sad day when reporting on issues of integrity in our politicians is considered "silly and childish". Does Gillard worry about the ALP accepting donations from these problem gamblers?? Or you could say that she is spending a relatively small amount to have a trial to in the end save the billions Clubs NSW say it will cost them. But then you can put any twisted spin on it that you political inclination dictates. It seems sensible to me.

Even Tony Abbott may get off the fence after the trial. These are not Wilkies policies. These are a comprise position of the productivity comissions findings.

Another report that will be completly ignored. Infact I hardly remember a review that has been completly listened to I would be vary surprissed if we did not go into parliment house and find a range of reviews for toilet paper.

Can we as a nation get serious about what independant experts write. Annie my Belle, a witty written piece. I did not see the legally written agreement between JG and AW, and were you privy to it? I ask this question because there is a lot of talk of the ageement but who has wittnessed this agreement? I think Julia should just have presented A. W"s legislation to Parliament for a vote,she has to fail getting all of the legislation through,you can't win them all.

If it failed tinker with the legislation and resubmit it,because definate action has to be taken to stop this madness of pokies in pubs and clubs, leave it to casinos as is the case in WA. Well I don't know about red heads and rug salesmen I'm sticking with my chooks and goats analogy. Clearly the chook is going for a 5c bet having eventually worked out that you have to be in to lose.

Meantime the goat is trying to work out the odds on a bird in the hand being worth two in the bush but doesn't know if there is a number that big What's to stop Wilkie introducing a bill to achieve the reform that he and I want to see and test the numbers himself? Only thing it missed was some description of the rug salesmen's behaviour when he was an AJ before he was a rug salesman to round the article off nicely. Let us hope that this silly distraction is gone.

The Government has more important matters to look to than the small minded, narrow interest of a politician clearly out of his depth. Wilkie and his fellow do-gooders need to realise that, whilst problem gambling is a problem for a small minority, most of us can manage our lives without government interference of this kind.

He is one of those rarities, a man of integrity, and resigned his position in the army in protest over the decision to support the American war on Iraq.

He then worked tirelessly and at considerable financial loss to himself to promote his belief that the war was not justifiable as there was no valid evidence for pre-war claims that weapons of mass destruction existed. He has been proved correct. Why describe him as a rug salesman? Nothing wrong with that job but it gives a misleading if not dishonest portrayal of this remarkable man's background.

Stop behaving like the gutter press Annabel Crabb. Can I assume you fetch the coffees in your office perhaps? Shall we call you the tea-lady? Oh, I understand why he wants you to go to college. He was educated, like Fleming, at Eton, but unlike his creator, he was no snob.

Amazingly, considering the subject matter, the Jack Taylor novels have a touch of snob appeal. That counts me a snob in my mental attitude toward the Lockwoods. He who bullies those who are not in a position to resist may be a snob , but cannot be a gentleman. We are left with the uneasy impression that William is a snob. People will say he was a vulgar parvenu, a sycophant, a snob —heaven knows what.

statistically proven that

Also a female breast. Boomer - Male kangaroo. Boomerang - A rubber cheque they bounce. Boondie - Hard lump of sand. Usually used by kids for throwing at each other. Boots'n'all - To do something with gusto. Booze artist - Heavy drinker. Booze bus - Mobile breathalysing station. Booze-up - A party with more alcohol than food. Boozer - Pub, hotel or a person who drinks too much. Bore the pants off - Excessively boring.

Bored shitless - Very bored. Also called a scab. Bottle shop - Liquor store. Bottler - Expression used when something good happens, Ie. Bowerbird - Compulsive hoarder. Boys in blue - Police. Brass monkey weather - Very cold weather.

As in it's cold enough to freeze the balls off a brass monkey Brass razoo - Money. Usually said in the form of: Crack a tinnie Breaker - A person skilled in training wild horses. Breather - Take a rest. Breeze - Something easy. Brick shit house built like a - Someone who is large and usually muscular. Brick short of a load - Not very clever. Brickie - A bricklayer.

Bride's nightie Up and down like a - Anything that fluctuates. Bright as a two watt globe - Not very clever. Bright spark - Clever person. Broad in the beam - Someone with a big bum. Brown eye - Showing ones bottom pulling the cheeks apart, similar but more vulgar than mooning. Brown eyed mullet - Feces floating anywhere people swim. Brown nose - To suck up, crawl to someone. Brumby - Wild horse.

Buckley's chance - No chance at all. Budgie smugglers - Man's swimming costume, usually tight fitting as in Speedos. Buffin' the muffin - Having sex.

Bugger - In Australia the word bugger is not used for its traditional meaning which I am not about to discuss here. Its meaning depends on how it is used. Bugger off - To leave or to tell someone to leave. Buggered if I know - No idea at all.

Buggerlugs - Affectionate nick name. Buggery - A mythical place that you tell someone to go to rude. Built like a brick shit house - Anything that is very big and strong. A bigger version is called a bull bar. Bull dust - A lie. Bullamakanka - Another mythical place in the middle of nowhere. Bully for you - Good for you. Can also be said sarcastically. Bum fluff - Adolescent's first facial hair. Bummer - A big disappointment. Bun in the oven - Pregnant. Also up the duff or preggers.

Bunch of fives - A clenched fist. Usually someone is 'given' a bunch of fives. The same thing as a knuckle sandwich. Bung - Something broken or carelessly put somewhere. Bunyip - Mythical creature.

Burl - To try something. Burl give it a - To take a chance, give it a go.. Burr up - To get angry. Bush - Anywhere away from town. Bush bash - Drive across country where there are no roads. Bush lawyer - Someone willing to argue the merit of their case based more on their personality than on facts.. Bush oyster - Nasal mucus, usually referred to when snorted in and swallowed yuk! Bush pig - An ugly person. Bush quack - Bush doctor, untrained, unqualified and sometimes unreliable.

Bush telegraph - The way messages travel quickly by unconventional means. Can also refer to gossip. Bush tucker - Food drawn from sources in the bush. Bush TV - campfire. Bushed - exhausted; lost; tired. Bushfire blonde - Red headed woman. For men the name Blue or Bluey is often used. Bushie - farmer or someone that has lived in the country all their lives.

Bushy tailed - Healthy and wide awake. As in 'Bright eyed and bushy tailed. Busy as a centipede on a hotplate - Very busy. Busy as one legged bloke in an arse kicking contest - Someone who is doing nothing. Butcher's hook - Rhyming slang for 'take a look'. By a cat's whisker - Just managed to do something. Cabbage patcher - Someone from the state of Victoria. Cack-handed - Left handed. Cackleberry - Chicken's egg. Cactus - Spoiled or ruined.

As in 'Shut your cake hole! Call it a day - To finish work for the day. Camp as a row of tents - Homosexual male. Can't take a trick - Someone who is unlucky. Cancer stick - Cigarette. Cane toad - Someone from Queensland.

Captain Cook - Rhyming slang for 'take a look'. Carpet muncher - Lesbian Carry on like a pork chop - To be silly or express frustration or anger that is out of proportion to the problem. Cat's hiss - Rhyming slang for 'take a piss'. Cat's pajamas - refers to a person who thinks they're better than others. He thinks he's the cat's pajamas. Like bee's knees etc. Cat's piss mean as - A person who is mean. Charge like a wounded bull - Ridiculously high prices.

See any shop in the country to experience this. Chateau de cardboard - Cask wine. Cheap as chips - Inexpensive. Prices that used to exist in shops but are seen no more.

Cheap drunk - Some one who gets drunk after only one or two drinks. Cheapskate - Penny pincher, tight wad, money grubber, long pockets short arms, Ie. Cheerio - Fare well statement. Cheese and kisses - Rhyming slang 'missus' the wife. Chew and spew - Cheap eating joint with poor quality food. Chew the fat - To have a long talk. Chewie - Chewing gum or bubble gum. Chiack - Make fun of but with good humour.

Chickenshit - Too afraid to do anything. China plate - Rhyming slang for a 'mate'. Chinwag - To have a long talk. Chockers, chock a block - Very full. Can refer to eating food or fitting things into something. Choof off - To leave. Chook - A chicken. May also refer to an older woman Ie. Choppers - Teeth, real or false. Chrome dome - Bald head.

Chuck a sickie - Taking sick leave without being sick. A national past time. Chuck a U-ie - To do a U-Turn in a vehicle. Chuck up - Vomit. Chunderous - Something that makes you feel sick. Clanger - To make a big mistake. Usually in conversation as in; 'He really dropped a clanger.

Originates from a non-alcoholic drink that was promoted as a substitute for spirits. Clean skin - Unbranded cattle or a bottle of wine with no label. Click - A kilometre. Clobber - Clothes or also meaning to hit someone.

Clucky - A woman who wants to have a baby. Clued up - Well informed. Coathanger the - Sydney Harbour Bridge. Cock and bull story - A tall tale.

Cockroach - Queensland expression for people from New South Wales. Cocky or cockie - Farmer can also be used to describe someone who is a smart arse. A smart arse farmer would be a cocky, cockie.

This can also be a cockatoo or a cockroach. Cocky's joy - Golden syrup. Codger - Old man. Codswallop - A load of nonsense. Coffin nail - Cigarette. Cold as a mother-in-law's kiss - Unwelcoming. Coldie - Cold beer. Come a cropper - Literally to fall down but also means to suffer bad luck. Come a gutser - Have an accident.

Compo - Payment made to employees who are injured while working. Conchie - Conscientious objector during a war. Cooee - A cal made in the bush when trying to attract attention. Cook the books - Falsify business accounts. Coot - Old unpleasant man. Cop - Policeman or to be on the receiving end of something unpleasant. Cop a piece of lead - To be hit by a bullet. Cop it sweet - To accept defeat with good grace. Cop shop - Police station. Cop-u-later - Can be a farewell but can also be used as a 'sounds like' for the word copulator.

Cornstalk - Person from New South Wales. Corroboree - Aboriginal ritual dance. Cot case - Crazy person. Cotton on - Understand something. Could eat a horse and chase the rider - More than just hungry. Could kick the arse off an emu - In very good health. Could sell boomerangs to the Aboriginals - Very persuasive person. Australian adaptation of 'could sell refrigerators to the Eskimos'. Couldn't fight his way out of a wet paper bag - A weak person.

Couldn't get a kick in a stampede - Unlucky person. Couldn't give a continental - Couldn't care less. Couldn't hit the side of a barn - Someone with poor aim. Couldn't knock the skin off a rice pudding - A weak person. Couldn't lie straight in bed - A liar. Couldn't organise a screw in a brothel - An inept person.

Couldn't run a chook raffle in a country pub - An inept person. Counter lunch - Lunch sold in a country pub. Cove - Old slang for Bloke, man etc. Cow juice - Milk. Cows come home waiting 'till the - Waiting for a long time. Cozzie - Swimming costume. Also speedos Crack a fat - To get an erection. Also crack a horn. Crack a tinnie - Open a can of beer. Crack onto someone - Romantically 'hit' on someone. Crackerjack - A good idea. Cranky - Bad tempered. Crap - Excrement; shit.

Crash hot - Excellent. Brown nose, arse licker etc. Creeping Jesus - Evangelical Christian. Same as bible basher. Crook - Can mean either feeling ill or a criminal. Crooked as a dog's hind leg - Something out of alignment or a thief. Crow-eater - South Australian resident. Crown jewels - Male genitalia. Cruddy - Low quality item. Crumblies - Frail old people. Crust to earn a - To work for an income. Cubby house - Children's play house. Cultural cringe - Refers to Australians who think Australian things are not good enough compared to things from other countries.

This is thankfully less apparent today. Cuppa - A cup or mug of tea or coffee. Curly - Bald person. Curry give someone - Make things difficult for someone. Cushy - Anything easy. Dag - A practical joker or dried sheep poo stuck to the wool. Damage - The cost of something as in 'What's the damage? Someone with their 'dander up' is to be avoided.

Darwin stubby - A normal stubby is a small bottle of beer. Dead as mutton - Dead. Dead but won't lie down - Can mean persistent person but is often used when describing real dead people like Princess Dianna or Elvis who are dead but never seem to be out of the press.

Dead dingo's donger as dry as a - Very dry. Dead horse trying to flog a - A hopeless cause. Dead to the world - Sleeping very soundly. Deadset - Very focused or without doubt. Dekko - To look. Derro - Homeless person with addiction problems. Dice - To throw away. Dick head - Fool or idiot. Dicky - Poor quality. Didn't bat an eyelid - Showed no reaction or emotion. Didn't come down in the last shower - Someone who can't easily be fooled.

Digger - Originally used to describe gold miners but later became a term to describe someone in the Australian Army. Digs - The place you live in.

Dilly-bag - A bag used to carry food. Dingdong - A fight or argument. Dingy - Small aluminium boat. Dinkum - Authentic Australian. Dinky di - Authentic Australian. Dip out - To withdraw. Divvy up - Separate or share out. Do a flit - Run away from something.

Do a Melba - Return from retirement many times. Do a perish - Die usually in the outback. Do me a favor - Don't tell me lies or fibs. Do the dirty - To do the wrong thing to someone. Do your block - Lose your temper. Do your dash - Reach your limit especially with regard to gambling. Dob - To inform on someone. Dobber - An informer. Doesn't miss a trick - Alert to every opportunity. Dog and bone - Phone. Dog's breakfast - A mess. Dole bludger - Someone taking government handouts without good reason.

Don't come the raw prawn - Don't try to trick me. Don't pick your nose or your head will cave in - Calling someone stupid. Done like a dinner - Comprehensively defeated. Dong - Ti hit someone. Donga - Rough accommodation and more recently, a general term for sleeping quarters..

Donk - Vehicle engine. Donkey's years - A long long time. Donkey vote - An invalid vote in an election, usually cast that way deliberately. Doona - Lined bedding made from synthetic fibre, feathers or wool. Dorothy Dixer - A question, prepared in advance, to make the person questioned look good. Usually used by politicians. Doss-house - Boarding house.

Double-dink - To carry a passenger on a push-bike bicycle on the handlebars and another on the back. Dink or dinky was to carry just one passenger. Down under - Australia. Drag the chain - Lag behind, go slow. Dreamtime - Aboriginal culture and religion is centered on their 'genesis' beliefs. The dreamtime can be viewed as the Aboriginal view of 'genesis'.

Dribs and drabs - A bit at a time. Drink with the flies - Drink alone due mostly to unpopularity. Drip - Foolish person. Droob - Slow witted. Similar to nong, drongo and drip.

Drop a clanger - To say something very inappropriate. Drop kick - Slow witted. Drop your bundle - To have a nervous breakdown. Drop-bears - Mythical creatures which jump from trees and sink their fangs into the heads of their victims. Said to look like koalas. Drover - Cattlemen who herded cattle over the vast distances of the outback Drover's dog - Lowest common denominator in abilities.

Duck's disease - Long body but short legs. Ducky double - Used to express delight in something good. Apparently comes from a type of ice-cream favoured by children.

Duffer - Fool but a popular one. Duffing - Stealing livestock. Dull as a month of Sundays - Very boring. Dummy to spit the - Lose one's temper. Dumper - A wave that dumps surfers into the sand. Dunking - Dip a biscuit into a cup of tea or coffee. Dust-up - A fight. Ear-basher - A person who can't stop talking. Earwig - Listen in on someone else's conversation. Egg beater - Helicopter.

Eighty proof - Refers to a spirit drink, usually rum. El cheapo - Cheap and nasty or a miser. Emma Chisit - How much is it? Enzed - New Zealand.

Esky - A portable container used to keep things especially beer cold. Even stevens - Equal or fair result. Every bastard and his dog - Means too many people. Face fungus - Beard. Face like a chook's arse - Someone who is showing their misery on their face. Fang - Drive a car a high speed now obsolete. Fag - Cigarette or homosexual. Fair crack of the whip! Fair dinkum - What I'm saying is true. Fat chance - No chance.

Feral - Generally refers to young untidy and dirty individuals. Technically anything gone wild. Few stubbies short of a six pack - Slow witted. Fit as a mallee bull - In good health. Five finger discount - Stealing from a shop. Fizzer - A disappointment. Flake - Commonly used in fish and chip shops to try and disguise the fact that the fish is really shark. Shark is actually very good to eat. Flake out - Collapse exhausted. Flat chat - Going as fast as possible. Flat out like a lizard drinking - Working extremely hard.

Flat to the boards - Going as fast as possible or working very hard. Flick to give the - To dismiss something or someone. Flies skating rink - Bald man's head. Flip your lid - Lose your temper.

Floater - Meat pie in a dish of green pea soup. South Australian speciality also means faeces floating in water. Flog - To steal. Flog the log - Masturbate. Flophouse - Very cheap accommodation. Fluff - To fart or to make a mistake. Flutter - A small bet. Flynn in like - Usually means having sex.

Refers to Australian movie actor, Errol Flynn who was notorious for seducing women and later for being bi-sexual.

Folding stuff - Money notes not coins. Footy - Australian Rules Football. English football is called soccer. For crying out loud - Expression of anger. Fossick - Search for gold that is on the surface. Fossick around - Look around for something. Four by two - A lump of wood. Four mile wailer - Loud siren used to alert volunteer fire fighters. Fox - An attractive woman opposite of dog. Freebie - A gift. At least she kept her promise at the last election that we'd now see the "real Julia".

Like you I've seen enough. I think its the pokie owners. Politicians should be subject to the Trade Practices Act, much in the same way shops are. So if a shop promises that an article will do X and you buy it based on that promise and the product doesnt perform as represented then you have remedies that are enforced against the shop.

The same rules should apply to politicians who make promises to get your vote to gain office and then do not act according to their representations. So if a politician says " There will be no tax" and people vote the politician into office based on this representation and then the politician brings a tax in there should remedies enforced against the misrepresenting politician. The penalities for politicians that misrepresent could be that the offender be banned from ever seeking further office, or tht they lose their salary for the term of office, or pehaps they lose their super etc.

In other words obtaining votes and office by false representations should be similar to obtaining money by false representaions. Now obviously there will be some situations where outside factors necessiate changes, eg finacial crisis etc. The present situation is that if LibLab the shopkeeper misrepresents what a product will do then there are consequences however if LibLab the politician does the same then there are no consequences but only the rewards of office.

This is not right. Yep strong as nails that need high level nail strenghtener products to possibly give her some back bone. With this cynical and simplistic piece, Crabbe once again shows the disdain she has for the politicians in the parliament which provides her a living.

Not hard to guess what the hard working MPs that she serially ridicules think of her. Politicans don't "supply anyone's living". They politicans live of tax payer money, indeed overly generous amounts of it.

The tax payer supplies a politicans living. Ms Crabb is very probably a net tax payer. Therefore she has not only a legal right, she also has the moral right to slag them off to her hearts content. If I were in her position, I'd excercise that moral right often and brutally. It astounds me the general journalist hasn't already ripped Gillard to pieces. Simply put, she's placed herself in a position to be ripped apart, and it would be a public service doing it.

Fred "the rug man and the red head and wing nut". This is how the chief online political writer of our national broadcaster refers to an independant Member of Parliament, our Prime Minister and the Leader of the Opposition. The main thrust of any of her writing is to insult Abbott and denigrate any opponent of Gillard. Actually, I believe Ms Gillard copped a fairly decent spray in there as well for her obvious lack of intent to ever follow through on the agreement she made with Mr Wilkie.

There are serious trust issues now she has to contend with, regardless of what reforms she has decided to "trial" in ACT again, given the treatment by Annabelle. I'd hardly call it a glowing support for the Ms Gillard and the government.

Whenever I see one of Annabelles articles published I make a beeline to it because ALL pollies are targets regardless of which side they come from.

I usually enjoy her stuff. She's kinda hot also. Does that line mean my post wont be posted? Said Rug Salesman is grandstanding on a lie. Read the agreement - it is available online. The hospital funds were a legitimate part of that agreement. So was the government's undertaking to legislate to achieve a full precommitment scheme Sections 7. The terms of the agreement have been publically available and clear to all for a very long time.

Since when is it petulant to expect someone to abide by a signed, written agreement? You are fully entitled to disagree with Andrew Wilkie on pokies reform as I do , but to question his honour and principles because he expects the government to keep its word is beyond belief. Also, it wasn't Mr Wilkie that broke the agreement.

By the above logic, Ms Gillard would be taking the hospital funds back rather than Mr Wilkie giving them back. Whether you agree with what he requested is largely irrelevant; Mr Wilkie negotiated in good faith with Ms Gillard and on the basis of that supported her to form government.

Her argument that it wouldn't pass either houses doesn't ring true when she is still doggedly trying to push the Malaysia solution through which has no chance of being passed. The Malayasian CAN pass the house but not the Senate without the support of the Greens-which is why the Goverment tried to get a bipartisan agreement on it. The Pokies reform cannot pass the House without the support of Independents. Your reference to Andrew Wilkie as ' a rug salesman' is demeaning to his overall qualifications and his sincere desire to help his fellow men and women.

Such language hardly adds to the level of debate needed around these issues. You are not a satirist and as a senior journalist you do not impress. I couldn't agree more Jan1st - Annabel this country needs journalists who give us truth not just spin - give Andrew Wilkie some credit for an impressive career before he became a businessman who bought a business in the beautiful upmarket Salamanca Place in Hobart.

Well put Annabel, one only fears that in this story, not one of them will live happily ever after. Spot on as always Annabel! What a pathetic bunch of individuals from BOTH parties we have in the parliament at the moment Maybe I've missed it but I'd like to see some breakdown on the House numbers and why the Gillard-Wilkie bill wouldn't pass. Harry Jenkins is a lock. Where do these guys line up? If it's bound to fail, surely there's a story about either why some and be specific: If there's truly widespread public support, shine a light on the dark corners and see what happens.

Where is the analysis of the independants. Do they openly state that they do not support gambling reform? Have they been told to lie low for a while by Gillard? Crook, Oakshott, Windsor and Katter, men of principle? Gillard wanted to get out of the agreement as she was under attack from her own Caucus members. Gillard did not lobby the Indies to even see how they might vote or what they would vote for. I never ceases to amaze me just how ignorant and blind people can be.

Here we have a Government with basically no majority that has tried to make pokies reform by way of mandatory pre-commitment as per Wilkie's plan, has seen that there's no way that it will go through in its current form. So instead of foolishly accepting that and spending the next 10 months proving the point they have changed tak so Wilkie's reform will go through.

As a result, we have ALL of the media focusing on the politician rather than the solution. The Gillard goverment get all of the bad press because that is what sells! Meanwhile the people who REALLY stopped the poky reform the Opposition and a few Indendants don't rate a mention in the vitreol of commentators and the general public. I know its difficult for some moronic people to focus in on the reality but just try, try real hard to consider that if this legislation was to go to a vote, who votes for it and who votes against it.

I know the Government would have loved some bipartisanship on this and if thay had that we would have this reform by now. Supporters of our current Government love to crow about how effective it has been at passing legislation with a slim majority relying on the independents.

The opposition has nothing to do with it. If they wanted to pass the legislation they could. Gillard has strung Wilkie along until she secured the extra vote of Peter Slipper and doesn't need Wilkie; she now says "oh sorry we just don't have the votes". They never liked the anti-pokie legislation because of the electoral backlash and the loss of revenue although that goes to the states, if the states lose revenue due to a federal law who are they going to ask for compensation?

Tony Abbott shamelessly on the stage with the Pokie Lobby trying to make this needed reform into another weapon against Labor, and you say the Opposition has nothing to do with it. The Opposition could vote for it, but they won't, not because it is bad legislation, but because they can sit back and benefit from Clubs Australia campaigning against Labor in marginal seats, lying to the bogans about how these reforms will take away their kids' footy, not to mention their Las Vegas Kitsch Party Palaces they spend their weekends in.

This argument that the Opposition doesn't need to act responsibly is a serious threat to parlimentary democracy. The concept that the only job of the Opposition is to bring down the government is a new and destructive element that we will regret.

Well said, but sadly the bias media does not realise the PM has to work with this parliament. Bemused and disturbed by author's 'rug salesman' tag to describe Andrew Wilkie. Many of us remember his previous job in defense intelligence and his brave stand on Iraq. Bar Malcolm Fraser, I know no other Australian public figure today as brave.

Two men who would risk their jobs because of a belief in truth, peace and the greater good. All the other things which used to inspire us when we were young but get scraped away by 'experience' and fear and ego. And sound really corny now. Not true for Wilkie or Fraser. After graduation and being stationed in Brisbane, he became a member of the Liberal Party.

Wilkie resigned from the ONA on 11 March ,[3] claiming that the reports did not support such claims and in the years since his resignation, no valid evidence supporting the pre-war claims of weapons of mass destruction has ever been found. Susan - I guess this just goes to show that you can't trust everything you read on the internet. Even Wikipedia is only a collation of what unidentified people have written - it is is not authoritative! Wilkie did not resign "claiming that the reports did not support such claims" of WMD , but that the presence of WMD did not justify the planned invasion and in so doing he confirmed his belief at that time that Saddam did have them - this is a quite significant distinction.

Time seems to have affected memories of what he actually said at the time. But, I'm not diagreeing with you that Crabb's description is childish and churlish, nor am I questioning Wilkie's commitment and beliefs - but please, lets get the facts right and not perpetuate this myth.

Had to check your title yet again. The whole issue is politically comical! Annabel rightly frames it in the correct context! It's nothing but blunder after blunder over an issue that is primarily political and offers no real solution to problem gambling! Annabel uses humour,and many other literary devices, to both entertain and inform and she does it with great skill.

Perhap some of her readers are unable to appreciate her talents. If the available evidence does suggest the population wants pokie reform Yes, I have often wondered why the Labor government has to carry the cost alone of every reform it has tried to enact. Clubs Australia was targeting Labor members, a disturbing development in the application of money to influence elections. Where were the supporters of pokie reform in helping counter this, because if labor lost those seats, it certain the LNP would repeal the legislation.

Anybody concerned by the massive application of money and lies and half truths used by the mining companies and Clubs Australia to subvert the democratic process and influence control? The wealthy have always had access to those in power that the average voter could never dream of, but this blatant application of money to influence decisions is a frightening escallation in the disenfranchisment of the average voter.

Like most commentators Annable is missing the point. Poker machines have been allowed to grow like a cancer. Every State except thankfully Western Australia has allowed them to spread; has allowed them to increase the amount of cash they can suck out of players AND contribute to the States' coffers.

In some communities clubs have become the focal point for many in the community, contributing to the sporting and social needs of that community. And creating employment for many and undoubtedly a nice little earner for a few. According to Mike Kell in his electorate of Riverina there are 90 clubs with pokies-that shows how much of an integral part of the community this cancer has become.

But if we are to believe the clubs -most of this cash comes from sucking dry the weak and vulnerable in those communities and without that sucking-the clubs could not survive. Along comes Wilkie and genuinely tries to do someting about controlling the cancer.

He does a deal with the PM- whether she did it in good faith or not is beside the point-Tim Costello thinks she did but Wilkie and the PM could not get it through parliament. Same thing will happen with the Murray Darling Plan- nothing- so we will continue to suck money out of the weak and water out of the Murray basin- until there is none left.

Thats democracy Annabel and that is the point. Trite as usual Annabel. Perhaps the redhead did the sensible thing. Knowing what every 'knowledgeable' journalist knew - that the measure wouldn't pass - she pulled forward the timing and avoided another four months of feral misinformation from the Clubs.

The deal was that mandatory pre commitment had to be legislated for by May. What would have happened in May occurred in January. A sensible outcome under the circumstances. Of course it wouldn't make for good copy so better to continue with the juvenile stupidity that nowadays passes for journalism. I only visit this site to see what you have written - common sense always. Some contributors take Annabel's piece too seriously.

I enjoyed its humour. My only criticism is that she is too kind to Mr Abbott. It's always sad to see politics warp the intended purpose of government. Despite the majority of Australians supporting the proposed pokie reforms, interest groups, advertising campaigns and political machinations i. This is not a criticism of the current government, as both parties have been guilty of the same, to varying degrees. I look forward to a day when government again acts in the best interests of the general public, or more to the point, does not allow vocal minorities to hijack this fundamental of democracy.

They always seem too don't they even though as we all know empty barrels make the most noise. But to be fair to them- clubs DO provide employment and benifits for many- and if it was you and I fearing losing our jobs and our benifits we too may make a lot of noise.

The sad truth is people could be in favour of something-until they fear it may impact THEM- then it only takes a dishonest campaign as that waged by the Clubs over poker machine reform or the mining industry over the mining and carbon tax and a hypocritical opposition for them to change from support to opposition.

Where the empty barrels come in is when the fear which has benn instilled in them makes them think only about themselves and not of the poor who are being bled dry by poker machines or of the enviroment which is being poisoned.

Illegal drugs such as cocaine, meth etc also keep people "employment and benefits for many". Pokies and gambling are as harmful as illegal drugs. Am I missing something here? The majority of the voters say they want wholesale pokie reform. Most of the media, including Ms Crabb all seem to think pokie reform is a good idea and big money campaign from the Clubs is decried as corporate bullying and bad for our democracy.

But when it is clear that a majority- I'll say that again-A majority of MPs in the House of Reps will not vote for wholesale reform, what does the nation and the media do? Same old, same old stuff. No-one really wants to ask the simple key questions.

Where are the missing votes to support legislation? Who are the MPs missing in action on support for pokies reform? Where are Ms Crabbe and her colleagues in this? Sniping from the sidelines or putting some attention where it's needed if reform is to proceed?

Holding to account those MPs who will not vote yes to change? No, they are all writing wearying cynical put-downs of the PM as weak, or faux sympathetic pieces about the social damage of gambling addiction and calling for someone, somewhere else to do something about it. And the voters who support change-their views don't seem to be shifting any votes across the line in the Reps.

Ms Crabbe could contribute something positive to help them, and list by name and electorate the position on pokie reform of all members of the HoR in her next Drum column on the issue. In the old days it was called "reporting". You collected the facts, sometimes they even spoke for themselves So Australia, lay off of the leader of our Minority government. Learn to count to I'll make it easy for you,thats Gillard plus 74 other MPs.

Now get of your own backsides and find the missing votes for reform. You make the fatal mistake of believing the shonky push polling figures that the majority of people want to do something about mandatory commitment of pokie useage! They always know the true state of the game. They know that the bulk of the electorate doesn't give a toss about mandatory pre commitment of pokies as a solution to stop problem gambling!

They know that enough of these little people will object to being told how much they can spend on pokies, or won't be dictated to by legislation "meant for others", and that this will impact adversely on the ALP member's chances at the real polls. So there should be no confusion with what is happening here!

Just a game of politics! And the ALP plays these games better than anyone else. Nothing useful to see here! Making use of every opportunity, just follow the money trail. You see what is really going down now? Oh yes Albo- I sure get what is going on now- you are playing politics and pointing to an evil on the oneseside while convienently forgetting the evil on the other.

I do not hear one word from Tony Abbott and coalition supporters about the immorality of the party accepting donations from the tobacco industry. Oh yes Albo- whats going on is just another lot of hypocrisy. Gillard did not go to Parliament as her own Ccaucus members such as Mike Kelly were very much against Wilkies Agreement and may have crossed the floor.

Gillard has undermined positive action on this issue as well. I can't work Gillard out. The people from Altona must have their own unique take on reality. For myself as a supporter of Wilkie's reforms this has been a big let down and I sway between feeling very cynical and scathing of what has transpired but also knowing there are still possibilities for change but with much less certainty of significant reform being implemented any time soon.

Short sightedness and self interest blocks many from seeing this was a unique chance to set a precedent in this area. Eventually, with or without reforms, new generations will move with the times and technology, where what was once important to previous generations will no longer appeal. However, until this occurs it is still very important for reform, not least for the reason that we should be very vigilant to not allow a situation to grow out of control as has been the case with the poker machines where you have an entrenchment of far too many reliant on money, of which, a significant proportion very often leaves others in dire straits.

Going over all that's happened and I could be very wrong about this. Although Harry Jenkins the speaker who stood down late last year and gave Julia Gillard an extra vote had previously indicated his move away from this position anyway. Prior to Peter Slipper coming on board, Jenkins made an out of the ordinary speech about his concerns over the damage caused by poker machines.

Regardless of whether or not he truly held this belief, it does make me wonder now whether this was actually staged with the aim to soften the impending blow and help reassure that all was well, when patently it was not. Nothing wrong with a Rug Salesman that elevates himself as paladins of decency and honesty.

It is different if a Rug Salesman that sells Rugs made by Slave Children somewhere in India or other countries to lecture us about morality, honesty etc. Such a person would be an hypocrite.

It is Tony Abbott fault that events have turned the way they have. It is is fault that all the Union Tugs turned politicians cannot be trusted anymore.

Abbot fault with is contagious negativity that the prime minister herself is turning negative on gambling reform. Maybe the rug seller should have given the Red Head the correct measurements, but like most rug salesmen he wanted the numbers to come to him. Then again maybe the Red head should have done his work for him. So the rug salesman should have provided the rug and come up with the payment too. Some deal that would be. No, Gillard agreed to make it happen, that was her end of the agreement, her promise to Wilkie.

But, we all know only too well, Gillard's word is not worth the piece of carbon it's written on. I am a redhead as are some members of my family. This may sound harsh and insulting, but that is how us redheads feel when they read comments such as this. I am talking about Andrew Wilkie. He may not be as polished and smart-assey as some, but he is fairly new at the game and seems a decent honest sort of bloke. The whole article is condescending and quite frankly, I just wish we had more journalists with more knowledge and moral fibre than the lot we appear to have sometimes in these blogs.

I am a redhead. I was born in Australia, so were 6 generations of my ancestors. To refer to Gillard as a "redhead", "ranga" etc is as tedious as it gets. Since redheadism is quite common in this country, there is a self loathing involved, and also cognitive dissonance: I even saw a redheaded rednech abuse the PM as a "ranga"???

No doubt you also feel the same way about the derogatory use of "budgie smugglers"in relation to Tony Abbott. That swim wear is synonymous with the Life Saving movement and people denigrate all life savers when they use it as a term of derision against Tony Abbott who is also a life saver.

You tag a male by the kind of work he once did, even although he had other kinds of work. Several government backbenchers were despairing, singling out Uber, recently banned in London - a decision backed by by the Labour mayor Sadiq Khan - as an example of where the party can present the modern case for markets in presenting consumers with choice.

But Uber's plight was not mentioned by not one of the ministers who gave keynote speeches. With Corbyn tacking so far left, the Tory party has sought to combat his success by shifting left too, fighting Labour on issues like housing, university fees and the NHS - in short - enemy territory. With its response, the government hopes to paint itself the "balanced" option. As party chairman Patrick McLoughlin??? And there is no more pertinent symbol of a dysfunctional market than the UK's housing crisis where prices are now about eight times higher than the average wage.

In last year's address to conference, the prime minister cited the financial crisis and Brexit as evidence of the British public crying out for change and spoke of the "need to rebalance the economy In the rhetoric was far more pro-market but the policies to deal with the two issues were vintage Mayism.

On Sunday evening, May ended her birthday at Conservative Home drinks for the committee and gave a rousing speech on the need to re-prosecute the case for markets. We thought that over the last few decades we had made and won arguments about the importance of free market economies, about the importance of fiscal prudence, about the wealth creation," she said. We won the argument last time, we're going to win those arguments again.

But when put to the test May reached for state intervention and government handouts.

OVER 1100 FREE GAMES

Choose from
hundreds of
fun themes

Choose from
hundreds of
fun themes

Choose from
hundreds of
fun themes

Choose from
hundreds of
fun themes

Play pokies for FREE

Slots paddy energy, free Pokies Meaning Condescending Meaning the candle

Condescending definition: If you say that someone is condescending, you are showing your disapproval of the fact | Meaning, . Define condescending. condescending synonyms, condescending pronunciation, condescending translation, English dictionary definition of condescending. I'm really confused about the meaning of the word 'condescending'. Online dictionaries define it as bossy/disdainful, which fits with One woman felt that I was a.

Microgaming Pokies Speedo Water

🖕 Learn English Words - CONDESCENDING - Meaning, Vocabulary with Pictures and Examples